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Legal Forms for Starting & Running a Small Business

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The four previous reviewers have said most of what I planned to say. I've been a university professor teaching small business management for nearly 20 years. This is a thorough treatment of the subject that makes a good reference, especially for those just starting. Do not expect to find anything that strays from the direct subject however. Perhaps the most useful element of this 12th Edition is the inclusion of some implications of the Affordable Care Act. I would certainly recommend the book for exactly what it is: a legal guide for starting and running a small business.
Situations Matter

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I originally was anxious to read this book because I generally agreed with the premise and felt it might offer some useful additional insights, being written by a popular psychology professor. And, I have flipped through the pages and read bits and pieces on several occasions, assuming that one of those times something would picque my interest or curiosity. I am a retired business professor, and have seen so many of this type of book, I guess I'm just worn out of them. For someone who is new to the subject and is looking for an easy read, I think this might be a useful book. I'm confident the author will sell a good number of them. I really want to like it… I just cannot get through it, myself, however. I don't want to believe it is just me with the problem, since some other reviews have had some similar comments - along with, rightfully, some very positive things to say. I need to get this written and posted. Best wishes!
Writing Horses: The Fine Art of Getting It Right

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This review is being written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.I was very pleased with this book - it was all I hoped and expected it to be. As I write my second novel, which includes adding a horse as a major supporting character, I feel much more comfortable with my level of knowledge with this book in hand as a reference. Thank you for the opportunity to get any early exposure to this important contribution to the field.
The Wisdom of John Muir: 100+ Selections from the Letters, Journals, and Essays of the Great Naturalist

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This book is a good example where the product description is very descriptive. This book will be loved by John Muir followers and largely ignored by everyone else. Anne Rowthorn has done a fine job of compiling the book exactly as described. I will reiterate that this book is as much a reference as a book to read cover-to-cover. I enjoyed her commentary on John Muir as much as the Muir quotes. The writing of the late nineteenth is on exhibit in his writings. If you love that style and the wilderness of the west, you will thoroughly enjoy reading from this book. For me, personally, a little bit goes a long, long ways. Also, the font is extremely small and the 'literary' choice of ink color and paper did not provide enough contrast for me. It made it had to stay with it, for me. This book is a fine contribution, as noted in the description. I will hold on to it as a reference, because I admire the work of Muir. I know I will check back in, from time to time. to read another passage.
Why Can't I Change?: How to Conquer Your Self-Desctructive Patterns

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Dr. I writes very well, easy to read. Be aware that "attachment" is her field, so she sees the world through this lens. That being said, the research on which this book is based seems solid, at this time. Secondly, much of the recommended action, including in Chapter ending exercises, is not new, unless you haven't seen it before. Many of the activities work very well. Have, for a long time, whether you knew about "attachment" theory or not. I certainly recommend the book - again, especially for those to whom this approach is new. I can work very effectively for you. Thanks for the opportunity to review this book.
Bolivar: The Liberator of Latin America

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For me, as a first introduction to Simon Bolivar in any depth, this was an easy read and generally informative. I concur with earlier reviewers regarding lack of source citations and end notes, as well as photos. But, this was an uncorrected bound galley for LibraryThing Early Reviewers. I did appreciate what I got, and found it useful. I suspect most of us could use much more background in South American history - this is such a contribution. Thank you.
The Science of Liberty: Democracy, Reason, and the Laws of Nature

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I very much want to agree totally with the review, below, by wanack. I do not disagree with a word of the short review. However, I must agree somewhat with the earlier review by suggesting that the first two-thirds of the book would have sufficed. The basic premise of the mutually beneficial value of science and liberty working together for human progress is at the heart of the book. The rest of the book provides one illustration after the other to support the basic premise.
Plum Pudding Murder

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Plum Pudding Murder by Joanne Fluke is my first Hannah Swensen book. I do like mystery series in general, so assumed this would be ok. It took a while to get into all the characters mentioned, but she has the genre down well, of course, and after a bit I was into the whole small town life she has created in Lake Eden. Being an Iowa native, I'm quite familiar with small towns, cold weather, and Minnesota is nearby. As a life-time business educator, the small business financial intrigue was of interest, as well. It was also of interest that while the murder was introduced in the first few pages, we got two-thirds of the way through before we got back around to it. The recipes must be very popular, and are a great hook for the series. It was a fun read!
Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

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Jon Meacham wrote The Art of Power with the intent of producing a one volume account to help us better understand how and why this very complex and multi-dimentional Founding Father, Thomas Jefferson, performed the way he did in his time on the world political stage. Although a very private man, Jefferson was drawn into the political world by the times in which he lived and the convictions he held most dear.Meacham uses primary research on, and often direct quotes from, contemporary writings of Jefferson and his correspondents as well as others operating within his sphere, which, of course, was the whole world of his day. This is both the greatest strength of this work, and, perhaps, its weakness, as well. Others have commented that it is a difficult read - a full 500 pages plus more than 200 additional pages of endnotes. Because so many of the direct quotes were new to me, even having read many Founding Father biographies, they kept me going straight through the 500 pages. I hated stopping each night. But, I do understand how others may have wearied from them. Also, I knew many Jefferson stories not included here. However, I found that to be a satisfactory trade-off for all the new material and detail included here. After all, I really didn't need to hear all those stories repeated, in the end.For a person really wanting to understand Jefferson better, I rate this an outstanding addition to our literature. Thank you.
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