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Collateral Damage of a Drug War

Collateral Damage of a Drug War

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On May 11, 2009, four boat passengers were shot dead during a counternarcotics operation that involved Honduran and U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents. Although Honduran authorities announced that drug traffickers had been killed after agents had fired in self-defense, survivors of the incident, as well as local authorities, insisted that innocent people had been killed, including two women, a fourteen year-old boy and twenty-one year old man.

In late July of 2012, analysts from Rights Action and CEPR visited the region where the shooting took place. This report summarizes and analyzes the extensive testimony and other information obtained during the visit. It presents detailed narratives of the sequence of events on May 11 and provides detailed background profiles on the boat passengers who were fired upon as well as on key witnesses. It also describes the region and context in which the shooting incident occurred, in order to better understand its impact on the local community. Finally, it offers a series of key findings and formulates recommendations of measures that the U.S. government and international community should take to address the May 11 incident as well as the broader consequences of U.S.-sponsored drug policies in Honduras and the Central American region.
On May 11, 2009, four boat passengers were shot dead during a counternarcotics operation that involved Honduran and U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents. Although Honduran authorities announced that drug traffickers had been killed after agents had fired in self-defense, survivors of the incident, as well as local authorities, insisted that innocent people had been killed, including two women, a fourteen year-old boy and twenty-one year old man.

In late July of 2012, analysts from Rights Action and CEPR visited the region where the shooting took place. This report summarizes and analyzes the extensive testimony and other information obtained during the visit. It presents detailed narratives of the sequence of events on May 11 and provides detailed background profiles on the boat passengers who were fired upon as well as on key witnesses. It also describes the region and context in which the shooting incident occurred, in order to better understand its impact on the local community. Finally, it offers a series of key findings and formulates recommendations of measures that the U.S. government and international community should take to address the May 11 incident as well as the broader consequences of U.S.-sponsored drug policies in Honduras and the Central American region.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Center for Economic and Policy Research on Aug 15, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/14/2013

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Collateral Damage of a Drug War
 The May 11 Killings in Ahuas and the Impact of the U.S. Waron Drugs in La Moskitia, Honduras
 By  Annie Bird and Alexander Main, with research contributions from Karen Spring  August 2012
Center for Economic and Policy Research Rights Action
1611 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 400 1525 Newton Street NW  Washington, D.C. 20009 Washington, D.C. 20010
 
202-293-5380 202-783-1123 www.cepr.net www.rightsaction.org 
 
CEPR / Rights Action
Collateral Damage of a Drug War 
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 About the Authors and Researcher
 Annie Bird is a Co-director at Rights Action, in Washington D.C., and Alexander Main is a Senior Associate for International Policy at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in WashingtonD.C.Karen Spring is the In-country Coordinator for Rights Action in Honduras.
 
CEPR / Rights Action
Collateral Damage of a Drug War 
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