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11.27.12

11.27.12

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Tuesday, November 27, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 61
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................6
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .......................8Puzzles ......................7Classifieds ................7
Chanceof T-storms
59º/36º
 Wednesday 63º/34º
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NEWS
PAGE 5Fitness fads sweep Tuscaloosacommunity.
CROSSFIT
NEWS
| LGBTQ
T
he University of Alabama has entereddiscussions aboutimplementing gender-neu-tral housing on campus afterbeing prompted to do so bythe LGBTQ-student groupSpectrum.“Earlier this semes-ter, Spectrum approachedHousing and ResidentialCommunities to discuss thepossibility of gender-neutralhousing, since this is a topic of interest to some members of Spectrum and it is also beingconsidered by some campusesaround the country (primarilyin the northeast and west),”Director of Housing StevenHood said in an emailed state-ment.Spectrum is a UA studentgroup whose purpose is to cre-ate a supportive environmentfor the LGBTQ-student com-munity.Noah Cannon, president of Spectrum, said gender-neu-tral housing addresses manysafety issues commonly facedby these populations.“Gender-neutral hous-ing allows students to shareresidential space on campuswith whomever they mutuallychoose, regardless of genderidentity or legal sex,” he said.Cannon said gender-neutralhousing is far from common-place yet, but can be found inschools in 31 different states.“Gender-neutral housingaddresses a very serious safe-ty issue for LGBTQ studentson campus, particularly trans-gender students,” he said.“Transgender students livingon campus are housed accord-ing to their legal sex, not theirgender identity, creating a sti-fling and potentially hostileenvironment within the stu-dents’ own living space.”
CW | Shannon Auvil
Schools in 31 states feature gender-neutral housingoptions, an LGBTQ-student group is lobbying for UA to do the same.
By Chandler Wright |
Staff Reporter
SEE
HOUSING
PAGE 2
By Alexandra Ellsworth
Staff Reporter
Michaela Sanderson grewup in a house with no waterand very little food butplenty of mold and roach-es. When she was 8 yearsold, her 16-year-old sisterand mother-figure passedaway. When she was 11years old, she watched hermother pull out a gun andattempt suicide.Although the bullet onlygrazed her mother’s stom-ach, it was enough to causethe state to intervene andtake Sanderson away.Now a freshman at theUniversity of Alabamamajoring in social work andcommunication studies,Sanderson has experiencedmany difficulties growingup, but she said it was thosedifficult experiences thatgave her a desire to pursuecollege and succeed.“I knew what it waslike for a family to growup with nothing,” shesaid. “I wanted better formyself and knowing whatI want to be, I wanted topursue college.”UA graduates Catieand Jamie Lumpkin havebeen foster parents inBirmingham, Ala., for 12years. In addition to theirthree biological sons, theLumpkins have cared for 18children over the course of those years.For the Lumpkins’10-year-old foster daugh-ter, attending college wouldmake her the first personof her biological family toearn a higher education.“Education makes a hugedifference,” Catie Lumpkinsaid. “We tell our 10-year-old daughter who has beenwith us for almost threeyears now that she could goto college one day, and wewill do what it takes to helpher get there.”Unfortunately, successstories such as Sanderson’sand the Lumpkins’ areoften rare.“For some families, fostercare can become a cycle,”Catie Lumpkin said. “Someof the parents were in fostercare and now their childrenare too. Practically, educa-tion is a big turn around forthem.”
College degreerare for fostercare students
CULTURE
| FOSTER CARE
Program hopes toimprove statistics
SEE
REACH
PAGE 2
NEWS
| BAMA DINING
By Taylor Veazey 
Contributing Writer
More than 60 local schoolchildren piled pizza, nachosand cookies onto their platesin Burke Dining Hall Mondayafternoon, compliments of University of Alabama stu-dents who donated a mealfrom their meal plan.Meaningful Meals, a jointproject by SGA and BamaDining, asked UA studentsto donate a meal from theirmeal plans so a local childcould have a hot meal forThanksgiving.Keith Edwards, SGA assis-tant director of communica-tions for financial affairs,said more than 100 mealswere donated.“We wanted to use it as analternative to a toy drive,”Edwards said. “It’s hard fora college student to donatea $20 toy, so we thought thiswas a good alternative.”Students from OakdaleElementary School, rangingfrom second to fifth grade,also got the chance to dosome Thanksgiving-themedcrafts and activities andreceived a special visit fromBig Al.All the children were partof Al’s Pals, the University’smentor program for local ele-mentary school children, andtheir mentors were there toshare the meal with them.Ashley Torres, a juniormajoring in elementary edu-cation, mentors a fifth graderin the program. She said shehopes Meaningful Meals willbecome a tradition for Al’sPals.“I hope it makes themexcited for college and letsthem know they have a fam-ily here,” Torres said. “We’renot just their mentors; we’retheir friends.”SGA Executive SecretaryBrielle Appelbaum, who cre-ated Meaningful Meals, cameup with the idea while shewas an Al’s Pals mentor lastyear.“I fell in love with thechildren and knew I wantedto help them in some way,”Appelbaum said.
SGA, Bama Dining serve Thanksgiving to local children
CW | Shannon Auvil
Elementary students get a Thanksgiving meal Nov. 26 at Burke Din-ing Hall, courtesy of SGA and Bama Dining.
Burke hosts 1st Al’sPals Meaningful Meals
SEE
MEAL
PAGE 2
By Mark Hammontree
Contributing Writer
In a recent settlement overcriminal charges regarding the2010 oil spill, British Petroleumagreed to pay more than $4 bil-lion over the next five years.“BP’s agreement with theU.S. Department of Justice topay $4 billion to settle criminalcharges represents the largestcriminal payment in Americanhistory,” William Andreen, aUA environmental law pro-fessor, said. “The settlementresulted from BP’s agreementto plead guilty to 14 criminalcounts: 11 felony counts formisconduct or neglect by ships’officers; one felony count forlying to Congress; one mis-demeanor count under theMigratory Bird Treaty Act; andone misdemeanor count underthe Clean Water Act.”Of the $4 billion, Alabamawill be receiving approximate-ly $335 million, or a little lessthan 10 percent; however, themoney will not be given to localor state government, but tothe National Fish and WildlifeFoundation to be spent on envi-ronmental projects and recov-ery on Alabama’s Gulf coast.“The Foundation will workcollaboratively with the statesinvolved as well as with pri-vate stakeholders in order tospend these sums to remedyharm and eliminate or reducethe risk of future harm to thenatural resources of the Gulf,”Andreen said.Andreen said BP may stillpay out billions of dollars insettlements of civil suits thathave been brought againstthem and could be liable for upto $20 billion dollars under theClean Water Act.Under the Restore Act thatwas passed by Congress lastyear, much of the money wouldgo directly to the communi-ties and states affected bythe disaster.Karen Boykin, assistantdirector of the Center for GreenManufacturing, said at theUniversity, the current effectsof the oil spill are now largelyeconomic, although there arecertainly still environmentalconcerns.“The University and oth-ers have a number of on-going environmental researchprojects that are examiningimpacts on the ecosystems,ranging from sources for sea-food, wetlands, etc.,” Boykinsaid. “In the CGM, we use thesustainability triangle prin-ciple – Balancing People (LocalSocieties/Governmental), Place(Environmental), and Profit(Industry) for sustainable com-munities.“We hope for UA that theBP award distribution willof course include monies tocontinue long term researchstudies of the environmental,social, and economic impacts.”To Andreen, the settlementis a step forward in the processof recovery.
“I personally believe thatthis is a marvelous outcome,and I have every confidencethat the Foundation will usethese funds in an effectivemanner based on the best avail-able science,” Andreen said.“The settlement agreementalso provided for a number of steps to enhance the safety of BP’s operations in the Gulf of Mexico. These steps includethird-party auditing and veri-fication, training, blowout pre-venters, cementing of wells,and the development of newsafety technology.”
For Graham Byrd, a sopho-more majoring in engineering,the payout seemed like a fairsettlement for the criminal trialbut is not comparable to theamount of damage the regionhas suffered.“The lives and ecosystemsdestroyed by the spill can neverbe given a price,” Byrd said.
Alabama to receive $335 million of historic $4 billion BP settlement
NEWS
| BP OIL SPILL
Company settles 14charges out of court
 
Less than 60 percentof students in foster caregraduate high school andonly 3 percent of chil-dren who have been infoster care attend post-secondary education afterhigh school, according tothe National Center forMental Health Promotionand Youth ViolencePrevention.These statistics arewhat Alabama Reach, anew program launchedthis summer, hopes tochange. Alabama Reachseeks to be a resourcefor students who are cur-rently or formally fosteryouth, orphans, emanci-pated minors, wards of thestate or homeless youthby providing a supportiveenvironment on campus.The program currentlyhas 17 active students init and is funded primar-ily by the University, butit also relies on grantsand donations.Studies show 70 per-cent of people in fostercare have the desire togo to college, but only 25percent actually enroll,and only 2 to 3 percentof that actually gradu-ate, said Jameka Hartley,program coordinator of Alabama Reach.“Financial aid doesnot cover everything,”Hartley said. “[Foster chil-dren] often do not have asafety net or someoneto call. When an emer-gency happens, they canbe become more worriedabout eating and payingrent than about schoolstuff. We want to helpkeep those emergenciesfrom happening.”Hartley said it can makeall the difference for thestudent to know they arenot alone.Alabama Reach worksas a three-fold program –Reach Back for future stu-dents, Reach Up for cur-rent students and ReachOut for community mem-bers. Reach Out includesa mentoring aspect, wherestudents can be pairedwith an adult to be a men-tor for them.“The reason I am inter-ested in the mentoringprogram is because I wasrequired to get a mentorbefore,” Sanderson said.“I loved her and building arelationship with anyoneis awesome. You neverknow what kind of adviceyou could get.”Like Alabama Reach,the Lumpkins are tryingto change the statisticsas well.“The reality is thatthere is definitely a repu-tation for foster care,”Catie Lumpkin said. “Andthere is a reality thatthings are really brokenhere. The biggest thingthat we try to reinforce isthat this is a partnershipwith the parents. We wantto get them back on theirfeet, and we aren’t tryingto sabotage them.”Catie Lumpkin said theytry to create a home thatis uncharacteristic of ste-reotypical foster homes.They always strive toreunite the child with hisor her biological family.Adoption is a last resort,she said.“I don’t think there isa higher thing to do fora mom who has given upthan to be able to lookher in the eyes and tellher she can do it and thatwe believe in her,” CatieLumpkin said. “We say toher, you know we are herefor you and we will fightfor you as long as youare fighting for yourself.When we have a choiceto make with discipline,we will sometimes callmomma and ask how weshould do it, because weare doing life with them.”The Lumpkins keep intouch with the childrenand families even afterthey are no longer in theircare.“We talk to a lot of thefamilies, and from what Ihave gathered that is notnormal, but we make it apriority,” she said. “Wetake food to all our pastfamilies once or twicea month and make surethey have food and findout how they are doing.We have taken some of our past kids to churchwith us.”Catie Lumpkin said aprogram like AlabamaReach can have a bigimpact on a child’s life.“The fact is these kidshave so much life experi-ences and so much theycan bring to the table,”she said. “They know sor-row, they know joy, andthey know how to fightthrough difficulty and tri-umph. They are told alltheir lives that they couldnever be more, but to havesomeone tell them theycan do it, is huge.”
Appelbaum said Al’s Pals has beentrying to do something like this foryears, and they are excited to finallyhave the opportunity. She hopes to con-tinue Meaningful Meals and expand itto include multiple meals per semesterand involve more schools in the area.It’s a simple way for students to giveback, she said.“I wanted a different way to give backto children during the holidays,” shesaid. “So many students have the abil-ity to donate a meal. We’ll always havenew freshmen with meals to donate.”Gabreona Jones, a fifth grader fromOakdale, said she wants to study musicat the University when she gets olderand was excited to visit.“I like that we get to come to collegewith our mentors and see what they doevery day on campus,” Jones said.A lot of the children are at-risk stu-dents or have the potential to be at-riskwhen they get older, Appelbaum said.She hopes Meaningful Meals is a firststep for the children to realize howimportant school is and to encouragetheir desire to attend the University.“This is something they have tolook forward to when they get older,”she said. “Going to a college dininghall may not have a huge impact onsomeone like us, but if you’re a hun-gry child, it can have an impact foryears to come.”
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
 
LUNCH
Greek GyroChicken A La KingSausage & MushroomCavatappiSeafood SaladTurnip GreensMacaroni & CheeseBarley & Lentil Stew(Vegetarian)
FRESH FOOD
LUNCH
SteakTurkey ChiliChicken SandwichBaked Potato BarCorn on the CobbFresh Steamed BroccoliFloretsFresh Creamed Spinach(Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Mexican Chili MacaroniBacon & Chicken PizzaMacaroni & CheeseColeslawCorn on the CobFrench FriesMarinated Green Beans &Tomatoes (Vegetarian)
ON THE MENU
LAKESIDE WEDNESDA
 What:
Ribbon Cutting andGrand Reopening
 Where:
Schlotzsky’s on 15thStreet
 When:
3:30 - 4:30 p.m.
 What:
Spanish Movie Night:‘Valentin’
 Where:
337 Lloyd Hall
 When:
6:30 p.m.
 What:
Honors CollegeAssembly ‘Diverse Dessert’
 Where:
205 Gorgas Library
 When:
9 p.m.
TODAY 
 What:
Good Art Show
 Where:
 
Nott Hall
 When:
 
4 - 6 p.m.
 What:
 
Xpress Night
 Where:
Ferguson CenterStarbucks
 When:
 
6 - 9 p.m.
 What:
 
Men’s Basketball vs.Lamar
 Where:
 
Coleman Coliseum
 When:
 
7 p.m.
THURSDAY 
 What:
 
CLC Movie Night: Cityof God
 Where:
 
241 B.B. Comer
 When:
 
6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
 What:
 
Trivia Night
 Where:
 
Wilhagans
 When:
 
8 p.m.
ON THE RADAR 
GO
GO
Page 2• Tuesday,November 27, 2012
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036Advertising: 348-7845Classifieds: 348-7355
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348-6153
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348-2670
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348-8735
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osmspecialprojects2@gmail.com
 Jake Morrow  
osmspecialprojects2@gmail.com
 Will Tucker
editor-in-chiefeditor@cw.ua.edu
 Ashley Chaffin
managing editor
Stephen Dethrage
production editor
Mackenzie Brown
visuals editor
Daniel Roth
online editormagazine editor
Melissa Brown
news editornewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Lauren Ferguson
culture editor
Marquavius Burnett
sports editor
SoRelle Wyckoff
opinion editor
 Ashanka Kumari 
chief copy editor
Shannon Auvil
photo editor
 Anna Waters
lead designer
 Whitney Hendrix 
lead graphic designer
 Alex Clark 
community manager
 
FOLLOW US ONTWITTER@THECRIMSONWHITE VISIT US ONLINE ATCW.UA.EDU
 
LUNCH
Shrimp EtouffeeChicken BurritoManhattan Clam ChowderRoasted Red Peppers &LinguineFried RiceFrench FriesGrilled Vegetables & Rotini(Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Shrimp Macaroni & CheeseChicken and CheddarSandwichTomato & Rice SoupFresh Steamed VegetableMedleyBlack Bean Cakeswith Cheddar Salsa(Vegetarian)
BURKE
However, Cannon said gen-der-neutral housing optionsbenefit more than just trans-gender students on campus.Additionally, many LGBTQstudents would simply feelmore safe living with peoplewho do not share the samelegal sex as them,” Cannonsaid. “Gender-neutral hous-ing can provide that option.”Maria Katsas, the assis-tant director of housingat California Institute of Technology, said gender-neu-tral housing options are notsomething new to their cam-pus.“Gender-neutral hous-ing has been offered on ourcampus since the late 1970s,”Katsas said. “Soon afterwomen started attending theInstitute, [administration]realized it would be appropri-ate.”Although gender-neutraloptions have been preva-lent on some campuses fordecades, Cannon acknowl-edges the University adminis-tration as among the first inthe region.“With this conversation, UAis very ahead of the game,” hesaid. “No other school in theSEC has gender-neutral hous-ing, and very few other flag-ship universities do nation-ally. UA has historicallybeen more of a follower withregards to LGBTQ issues,and this is an opportunityto lead.”Katsas said students atthe California Institute of Technology can take advan-tage of a number of gender-neutral housing optionsacross campus.“There is no difference in[registration] process, stu-dents just list each other asroommates (specific people)or as gender-neutral on theirapplications,” she said. “It isan option everywhere.”Although the Universityis discussing gender-neutralhousing options, Hood didnot give a prospected date forimplementation.“We have entered into aconversation about genderneutral housing. The discus-sion is still in its infancy,”Hood said. “These discus-sions are relatively recent onour campus.”Cannon said Spectrum ispleased the University is pur-suing discussion about gen-der-neutral housing options,even though final decisionshaven’t been made.“Spectrum has spearhead-ed this initiative on campus,bringing the issue to theattention of housing. Nothinghas been established as of yet,but we’re happy to be havingthese conversations,” he said.“The University should abso-lutely initiate a gender-neu-tral housing program on cam-pus. It’s vital to the safety of the students on campus, andthat should be the biggest pri-ority for this school.”
HOUSING
FROM PAGE 1
UA ‘pursuing’ gender-neutral housing option
REACH
FROM PAGE 1
UA students mentorlocal foster children
MEAL
FROM PAGE 1
Al’s Pals offers local childrenThanksgiving meal at Burke
From MCT Campus
WASHINGTON -- TheSupreme Court has let standthe murder conviction of a paranoid and delusionalIdaho man who was deniedthe opportunity to mount aninsanity defense.Three justices dissented,arguing that the court shouldincorporate the long-stand-ing insanity defense intothe Constitution.Shortly after John HinckleyJr. was acquitted of theattempted assassination of President Reagan by rea-son of insanity in 1982, Idahoand three other states abol-ished the insanity defensefrom their criminal laws. Theothers were Kansas, Utahand Montana.Joseph Delling was a “par-anoid schizophrenic” whoshot and killed two of hisfriends because he believedthey were “trying to stealhis powers,” according toIdaho prosecutors.Delling had carefullyplanned the murders, andprosecutors successfullyargued he had the intent tocommit murder, even if hedid not understand why itwas wrong. Idaho law says“mental condition shall notbe a defense to any charge of criminal conduct.”Delling was sentenced tolife in prison for the murders,and the state Supreme Courtupheld his conviction andsentence last year.Stanford law professorJeffrey Fisher appealedDelling’s case to the SupremeCourt, contending that aninsanity defense is requiredunder the Constitution,either as an aspect of “dueprocess of law” or throughthe ban on “cruel andunusual punishment.”But the court turned downDelling’s petition Monday,over dissents by JusticesStephen G. Breyer, RuthBader Ginsburg and SoniaSotomayor. It takes thevotes of four justices to hearan appeal.Breyer said Idaho law “per-mits the conviction of anindividual who knew what hewas doing, but had no capac-ity to understand that it waswrong.” That could allow themurder conviction of a defen-dant who “due to insanity,believes that a wolf, a super-natural figure, has orderedhim to kill the victim,” he said.
Supreme Court rejects murder appeal claiming right to insanity defense
 
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Tuesday, November 27, 2012
N
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EWS
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PINION
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PORTS
Page 3
By Ashanka Kumari
Chief Copy Editor
Students have the opportunityto win a free semester of in-statetuition or one of 25 other prizesin SGA’s Crimson Spirit PointsInitiative.Will Pylant, vice president forStudent Affairs, said CrimsonSpirit Points came about afterstudent organizations voicedconcerns that they were havinga hard time drawing in crowds toevents.“We were looking for a waywe could bring students togeth-er as well as provide them withvaluable public service, and alsogive our student organizationsa chance to boost attendance attheir events,” Pylant said. “SpiritPoints are a way we can bringstudents together for a good pur-pose.”The athletic department, sportsteams, students and student orga-nizations can apply for CrimsonSpirit Points by completing a one-page application and returning itto the SGA office or submittingit online at sga.ua.edu at leasttwo weeks prior to the scheduledevent, Pylant said.Once the application isreceived, it will be turned over tothe Spirit Points committee. Fromthere, the committee will gradeeach application using a gradingrubric.“Once the Spirit Points commit-tee grades their application, wehave another form that the chairfills out, and then she turns it overto Rosalind Moore in the Dean of Students’ Office,” Pylant said.“From there, they will email thestudent organization and arrangefor them to get an ACT card swipemachine.”Meagan Bryant, SGA presssecretary, said students cancheck their Spirit Points numberthrough their myBama accounts.“This is an organic process thatwe need everyone’s help to makecome together,” Bryant said. “Weneed student organizations tosubmit their events so they canbe available for Spirit Points,and we need students to come tothe events, so it’s really a groupeffort.”Along with a grand prize of onefree semester of in-state tuition,the second and third prize win-ners will receive a new iPad, thetop 10 will receive a Daniel MoorePainting and the top 25 studentswill receive a $100 gift card to theSUPe Store.“This wouldn’t have been pos-sible without the different mov-ing pieces involved in this col-laboration,” Pylant said. “Wewant to thank Dr. Mark Nelsonfor his contributions and TheresaShreve for her contributions of the SUPe Store gift cards. We alsowant to thank Dr. Lowell Davis,Rosalind Moore and the Dean of Students’ Office. It’s really beenthe labor and toils of a lot of dif-ferent people.”Susan Griffiths, the assistantdirector of communications forStudent Affairs, said Spirit Pointsare a great incentive for studentsto get more involved in thingsthey wouldn’t have thought to beinvolved in.“It’s really opening a lot of doors for different organizationsto get their name out there,”Griffiths said. “I hope studentstake advantage of it.”
Spirit Points Initiative offers prizes for attending events
By Alan Alexander 
Contributing Writer
Members of The University of Alabama Dance Marathon teamwill be hosting two fundrais-ers on Tuesday as part of theirspirit night, with a portion of theproceeds going to the Children’sMiracle Network.The first fundraiser is atTCBY on McFarland Boulevardfrom 5 to 8 p.m. Patrons whomention UADM will have 20percent of their purchase go tobenefits raised for Children’sMiracle Network.Following the event at TCBY,UADM will also be hosting a minigolf fundraiser at Bama MiniGolf from 7 to 10 p.m. The cost toplay on one course is $5 and $7.50for two courses. Fifty percentof the money raised will go tothe fundraiser.UADM is an organizationthat aims to enhance the livesof children suffering from child-hood disease. It is a student-runphilanthropy at the Universityand revolves around a year-longfundraising effort that culmi-nates in an eight-hour no-sitting,no-sleeping dance marathonon campus.“The point of our organizationis to bring all of the students atAlabama together for one reallygood cause,” said Gloria Kelly,vice president of external affairsfor UADM.The money raised goes toresearch for cancer treatment aswell as to help support the fami-lies of those affected.“Without donors, some hospi-tals can’t keep their doors openfor everyone,” McKenzie Pope,director of corporate relationsfor UADM, said. “Outside of monetary donations, just beingthere for the kids is huge forthem. These families need thatsupport system.”UADM is coming off its inaugu-ral year in which it passed its ini-tial fundraising goal of $10,000 bymore than $5,000, and the groupexpects to see even more successwith its fundraisers.
Dance Marathon group to raise funds at TCBY, Bama Mini Golf tonight
By Sarah Robinson
Contributing Writer
As the diabetes rate in the stateincreases, more college studentsare stricken with the disease,facing challenges during theirenrollment as they make lifestylechanges to manage their condi-tion.According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention,Alabama is one of only six stateswith a diabetes rate higher than10 percent, and one in every nineAlabamians have the disease.“Diabetes is a very debili-tating disease,” said KoushikKasanagottu, president of the UADiabetes Education Team. “It def-initely has a great impact on thequality of life of a student.”One of the most common prob-lems among any type of diabeticis maintaining a healthy bloodglucose level, because the diseasecauses defects in the body thatdon’t allow it to produce or useinsulin.Diabetics often have to main-tain their own blood sugar levelsto avoid hypoglycemic attacks,which occur when the bloodsugar level is lower than normal,or hyperglycemic attacks, whichoccur when the blood sugar leveris higher than normal. Both hypo-glycemia and hyperglycemia canbe lethal.Diabetics have to monitor theirlevels daily to avoid having an epi-sode, Kasanagottu said.“They have to constantly moni-tor the amount of sugar in thebody by pricking their fingersalmost six to seven times a day,”Kasanagottu said. “Not only doesthis get expensive, but it also seri-ously hinders their way of life. Onaverage, a glucose strip costs $1.This can add up immensely.”UA graduate Dana Lewis, whohas Type One diabetes, saidshe initially struggled with herdiet during her freshman yearof college. Because her body’simmune system destroys all thecells responsible for making thehormone insulin that regulatesher blood glucose, Lewis makesa conscious effort to get the rightamount of insulin needed for herbody to function.“The biggest thing was beingable to figure out what I could eat,given the requirements to have ameal plan to eat in a dining hall,”Lewis said. “Because there is somuch variety of food, it was reallyhard to calculate how many carbswere in everything.”To make things easier for herand other students, Lewis workedwith Bama Dining to get nutritionlabels placed on the entrees.Diabetics must also limit theiralcohol consumption, accord-ing to the American DiabetesAssociation. Although bingedrinking presents dangers for allstudents, diabetics who chooseto participate are putting them-selves at an even greater risk.Alcohol can cause a dramaticdecrease in blood sugar levels,and sugary mixtures can raiseglucose to dangerous levels.Melondie Carter, the assistantdirector at the Office of HealthPromotion and Wellness at theUniversity, said diabetics shouldlet their roommates know theircondition, so they will be pre-pared if they have a negative reac-tion. She also advised diabetics towear medical alert bracelets thatlet people know they have thechronic illness.“They need to make sure theyhave enough insulin and suppliesalways on hand,” Carter said.“They need to have canned juicein case they have a reaction likehypoglycemia and their bloodsugar gets too low.”Carter said sugar gel or glu-cose tablets can be essential isaving a diabetic when they arehypoglycemic attack.“It’s more important to getdiagnosed and to be able to takecare of yourself than live with dia-betes undiagnosed,” Lewis said.“That is very dangerous.”
Students with diabetes face challenges as prevalence grows
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