Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
By the Numbers 2 Final

By the Numbers 2 Final

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,183 |Likes:
Published by The News-Herald

More info:

Published by: The News-Herald on Dec 07, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/07/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Developing a CommonUnderstanding for the Futureof Behavioral Health Care
BytheNumbers
2
 Analysis of Ohio’s Mental Health Non-Medicaid Spending
 
The Mental Health Advocacy Coalition iscomprised of over 120 member organizationsstatewide, including mental health agenciesserving both children and adults, health andhuman services agencies, the faith-basedcommunity, education, government, advocacyorganizations, major medical institutions, andthe corporate arena. The MHAC’s mission is tofoster education and awareness of mentalhealth issues while advocating for publicpolicies and strategies that provide aneffective, well-funded mental health systemthat serves those in need, resulting in a strongercommunity. MHAC supporters include: Eva L.& Joseph M. Bruening Foundation; ClevelandFoundation; Community West Foundation;The George Gund Foundation; The HealthFoundation of Greater Cincinnati; The Mt. SinaiHealth Care Foundation; William J. andDorothy K. O’Neill Foundation; Saint Luke'sFoundation of Cleveland, OH.; Sisters ofCharity Foundation of Cleveland andWoodruff FoundationWith offices in Cleveland and Columbus, TheCenter for Community Solutions identifies,analyzes, and explains key health, social,and economic data and issues, and proposesnon-partisan solutions to improve the livesof Ohioans. Founded in 1913, it has a nearly100-year reputation for providing timely andreliable data, analysis, and recommendationsregarding legislation and public policy.Policymakers, community leaders, funders ofhealth and human services, nonprofitprofessionals and volunteers, and othersrecognize The Center for CommunitySolutions as the source for information theycan use and trust.
Thank You!
The Mental Health Advocacy Coalition andThe Center for Community Solutions wouldlike to extend a special thanks to all of the boards that participated in the survey tocollect the data contained in this report.
Table of Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4Service Category Fact SheetsFact Sheet Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7Overview of Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8Consultation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14Consumer Operated/Peer Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18Court and Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22Crisis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42Other Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48Protective Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54Other Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56Bundled Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58Continuum of Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63End Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64Appendix 1: Group Breakouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66Appendix 2: Analysis by Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Publication Date: November 2012
 
In January 2011, the Mental Health Advocacy Coalition(MHAC) and The Center for Community Solutions (CCS)produced
By the Numbers: Developing a CommonUnderstanding for the Future of Behavioral Health Care
, ajoint report that provided the most comprehensive pictureto date of statewide behavioral health spending in Ohio.That report made recommendations to improve servicecoordination and delivery, and identified ways in whichincreased investment in behavioral health services wouldlead to better outcomes for individuals with severe mentalillness, their families, and society. The 2011 report alsostressed that individuals with mental illnesses need access toa full continuum of supportive services, such as housing andemployment, which are vital during treatment and recovery.This report,
By the Numbers 2
, focuses on vital supportiveservices which are often overlooked during policymakingprocesses. While supportive services are often under-prioritized, this analysis shows that the local Alcohol,Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMH)Boards (boards) recognize the importance of housing,employment, peer support and other supportive servicesfor individuals with mental illnesses, but most of themstruggle to provide a full array of programs and are forcedto make difficult choices about which services to fund.Investment in services varies substantially from board to board, but the fact that boards continue to invest in supportservices despite strained budgets speaks to the value of these services to clients, families, and communities.In the last two years, several major policy changes haveoccurred at the federal and state levels impacting thefuture of behavioral health care in Ohio. The two mostprominent policy changes were the passage of the federalPatient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) andOhio’s decision to elevate responsibility for matchpayments for behavioral health Medicaid services from thelocal boards to the Ohio Department of Job and FamilyServices (ODJFS). These two policy changes have raisedquestions from policymakers, stakeholders, consumers,providers and advocates regarding the impact that thesepolicy decisions will have on behavioral health services inOhio, specifically those services not reimbursable byOhio’s Medicaid program. The purpose of this report is tocompile and highlight statewide data regarding supportiveservices for individuals with mental illness that are notreimbursable by Medicaid. The intent of this report is toincrease the understanding of:1. what non-Medicaid services are and2. what services are being provided.
Funding of Mental Health Services
In Ohio’s mental health system, publicly funded servicesare reimbursed via two general funding streams – Medicaidand non-Medicaid. The Medicaid funding stream is usedfor individuals who are enrolled in Ohio’s Medicaidprogram and receive Medicaid reimbursable services. TheMedicaid covered mental health services (see Table 1) are“carved-out” out of the general managed care Medicaidprogram. This means that payments are made on a fee-for-service basis to providers rather than through managedcare organizations. The non-Medicaid funding stream ismade up of a variety of funding sources. The two mostprevalent are the state general revenue funds and local levyfunds. State general revenue funds are revenues the stategenerates through taxation that are not earmarked for anyspecific purpose. Through the state budgeting processthese funds are allocated to the Ohio Department of MentalHealth (ODMH). Local levy funds are property taxes eachcommunity has the discretion to levy to support mentalhealth services in their communities. The non-Medicaidfunding stream is used for two purposes:1. individuals not enrolled in Medicaid, who receivetreatment services included in the mental healthMedicaid package and2. services not reimbursable by Medicaid for allindividuals, regardless of their insurance status.This report focuses on this second group of services.
1
Introduction
Medicaid
Through Behavioral Healthcarve-out (fee for service)
Non-Medicaid
Treatment andOther Health Services
Community PsychiatricSupportive Treatment– Individual and GroupPharmacological Management• Partial Hospitalization• Counseling – Individual & Group• Crisis Intervention• DiagnosticAssessmentPsychiatric Diagnostic Interview
Non-Health Services
None
Treatment andOther Health Services
• Hospitalization at stateoperated psychiatric hospitals• Residential Treatment• Treatment servicesprovided in jails
Non-Health Services
• Housing• Transportation• EducationConsultation• Crisis StabilizationEmployment• Consumer Operated/ Peer SupportPrevention• Protective Services• Court Services• Hotlines• Information andReferral Services
Table 1:Matrix of Mental Health Funding Sources and Service

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->