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President Obama Remarks at Capitol Rotunda for Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration, February 12, 2009, Transcript and Video Link

President Obama Remarks at Capitol Rotunda for Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration, February 12, 2009, Transcript and Video Link

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Published by icebergslim
obama's remarks at the capitol rotunda for Abraham Lincoln.
obama's remarks at the capitol rotunda for Abraham Lincoln.

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Published by: icebergslim on Feb 13, 2009
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01/28/2013

 
President Obama’s Remarks at the Capitol Rotundafor Lincoln Bicentennial CelebrationFebruary 12, 2009
Thank you. Thank you. Please, be seated. Thank you very much. MadamSpeaker, Leader Reid, members of Congress, dear friends, former colleagues, it is agreat honor to be here -- a place where Lincoln served, was inaugurated, and wherethe nation he saved bid him a last farewell. As we mark the bicentennial of our 16th President's birth, I cannot claim to know as much about his life and works asmany who are also speaking today, but I can say that I feel a special gratitude tothis singular figure who in so many ways made my own story possible -- and in somany ways made America's story possible.It is fitting that we are holding this celebration here at the Capitol, for the life of this building is bound ever so closely to the times of this immortal President. Built by artisans and craftsmen, but also immigrants and slaves -- it was here, in therotunda, that Union soldiers received help from a makeshift hospital; it wasdownstairs, in the basement, that they were baked bread to give them strength; andit was in the Senate and House chambers where they slept at night and spent someof their days.What those soldiers saw when they looked on this building was a very differentsight than the one we see today, for it remained unfinished until the end of the war.The laborers who built the dome came to work wondering each day whether thatwould be their last; whether the metal they were using for its frame would berequisitioned for the war and melted down into bullets. But each day went bywithout any orders to halt construction, and so they kept on working and kept on building.When President Lincoln was finally told of all the metal being used here, hisresponse was short and clear: That is as it should be. The American people neededto be reminded, he believed, that even in a time of war, the work would go on; the people's business would continue; that even when the nation itself was in doubt, itsfuture was being secured; and that on that distant day, when the guns fell silent, anational capitol would stand, with a statue of freedom at its peak, as a symbol of unity in a land still mending its divisions.

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