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acsbr11-17

acsbr11-17

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Published by Benjamin Freed
American Community Survey Poverty Rate by Race
American Community Survey Poverty Rate by Race

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Published by: Benjamin Freed on Feb 20, 2013
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02/20/2013

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U.S. Department o Commerce
Economics and Statistics Administration
U.S. CENSUS BUREAU
census.gov 
Poverty Rates for Selected Detailed Raceand Hispanic Groups by State and Place:2007–2011
American Community Survey Briefs 
Issued Febuary 2013
ACSBR/11-17
By Suzanne Macartney, Alemayehu Bishaw,and Kayla Fontenot
INTRODUCTION
Poverty rates are important indicators o communitywell-being and are used by government agencies andorganizations to allocate need-based resources. TheAmerican Community Survey (ACS) 5-year data allowor the analysis o poverty rates by race and Hispanicorigin or many levels o geography.In this report, poverty rates are summarized by raceand Hispanic origin or the United States, each state,and the District o Columbia.Poverty rates are also presented or selected detailedrace and origin groups in the cities and towns withthe largest populations o these groups. For the nationand selected places, poverty rates are summarized or
01020304050Hispanic orLatinoTwo orMore RacesNativeHawaiian andOther PacificIslander aloneAsianaloneAmericanIndian andAlaskaNative aloneBlack orAfricanAmericanaloneWhite alone
Figure 1.
U.S. Poverty Rates by Race and Hispanic or Latino Origin: 2007–2011
(For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and definitions, see
www.census.gov/acs/www/ 
)Percent below povertyRaceHispanic origin
Note: Persons who report only one race among the six defined categories are referred to as the race-alone population, while persons whoreport more than one race category are referred to as the Two or More Races population. This figure shows data using the race-alone approach.Use of the single-race population does not imply that it is the preferred method of presenting or analyzing data. The Census Bureau uses avariety of approaches. Because Hispanics may be of any race, data in this figure for Hispanics overlap with data for race groups.Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2007–2011 American Community Survey.
 
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U.S. Census Bureau
detailed Asian groups with popula-tions o 750,000 or more, detailedNative Hawaiian and Other PaciicIslander groups with populationso 25,000 or more, and detailedHispanic groups with populationso 1 million or more.
HIGHLIGHTS
•Accordingtothe2007–2011
ACS, 42.7 million people or14.3 percent o the U.S. popu-lation had income below thepoverty level.
•Byrace,thehighestnational
poverty rates were or AmericanIndians and Alaska Natives (27.0percent) and Blacks or AricanAmericans (25.8 percent)
.
•NativeHawaiiansandOther
Paciic Islanders had a nationalpoverty rate o 17.6 percent.
•FortheAsianpopulation,
poverty rates were higher orVietnamese (14.7 percent) andKoreans (15.0 percent), andlower or Filipinos (5.8 percent).
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•AmongHispanics,national
poverty rates ranged rom alow o 16.2 percent or Cubansto a high o 26.3 percent orDominicans.
•Ninestateshadpovertyrates
o about 30 percent or moreor American Indians andAlaska Natives (Arizona, Maine,Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska,New Mexico, North Dakota,South Dakota, and Utah).
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Poverty rates or Vietnamese andKoreans were not statistically dierent romone another.
•ForAsians,ninestateshadpov
-erty rates o about 10 percentor less (Connecticut, Delaware,Hawaii, Maryland, Nevada,New Hampshire, New Jersey,Virginia, and South Carolina).
•The2007–2011nationalpov
-erty rate or Whites was 11.6percent, and most states (43) aswell as the District o Columbiahad poverty rates lower than14.0 percent or this group.The estimates contained in this
reportarebasedonthe2007–2011
ACS. The ACS is conducted everymonth with income data collectedor the 12 months preceding theinterview. The 5-year estimates areperiod estimates. They representthe characteristics o the popula-tion and housing over the speciicdata collection period.
Understanding Race and Hispanic Origin Concepts
Individuals who responded to the question on race by indicating onlyone race are reerred to as the race-alone population or the group whoreported only one race category. The text and igures o this reportshow estimates or the race-alone population. Six categories make upthis population: White alone, Black or Arican American alone, AmericanIndian and Alaska Native alone, Asian alone, Native Hawaiian and OtherPaciic Islander alone, and Some Other Race alone. Individuals whochose more than one o the six race categories are reerred to as theTwo or More Races population. All respondents who indicated morethan one race can be collapsed into the Two or More Races categorywhich, combined with the six race-alone categories, yields seven mutu-ally exclusive and exhaustive categories. Thus, the six race-alone cate-gories and the Two or More Races category sum to the total population.Hispanics may be o any race. For each race group, data in this reportinclude people who reported they were o Hispanic origin and peoplewho reported they were not Hispanic. Because Hispanics may be o any race, data in this report or Hispanics overlap with data or racegroups. For more inormation on the concepts o race and Hispanicorigin, see Humes, K., N. Jones, and R. Ramirez, “Overview o Raceand Hispanic Origin: 2010,” U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Bries,2011, available at <www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/bries/c2010br-02.pd>.See Census Bries and Reports, 2010 Census, at <www.census.gov/2010census/> or more inormation on the race and origin groupsdiscussed in this report.
 
U.S. Census Bureau
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NATIONAL
During the 2007 to 2011 period,42.7 million people or 14.3 per-cent o the U.S. population hadincome below the poverty level(Table 1). National poverty ratesdiered widely across race groupsand by Hispanic or Latino origin.
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Denitions o the race and Hispanic-origin groups used in this brie are availablein the 2010 ACS Subject Denitions Guideavailable at <www.census.gov/acs/www/data_documentation/documentation_main/>.Individuals who responded to the ques-tion on race by indicating only one race arereerred to as the race-alone population(e.g., “White alone,” “Black alone,” etc.). As amatter o policy, the U.S. Census Bureau doesnot advocate the use o the alone populationover the alone-or-in-combination populationor vice versa. The text and gures o thisreport ocus on the race-alone population.This approach does not imply that it is apreerred method o presenting or analyzingdata. The tables in this report show data usingboth approaches.Because Hispanics may be o any race,data or Hispanics overlap with data or racegroups. Thereore, data users should exercisecaution when comparing aggregate resultsor race population groups and the Hispanicpopulation.
Two groups had poverty ratesmore than 10 percentage pointshigher than the U.S. rate or thetotal population: American Indianand Alaska Native (27.0 percent)and Black or Arican American(25.8 percent). Rates were abovethe overall national average orNative Hawaiians and Other PaciicIslanders (17.6 percent) while pov-erty rates or Whites (11.6 percent)and Asians (11.7 percent) werelower than the overall rate (14.3percent).
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The Hispanic populationhad a poverty rate o 23.2 percent,about 9 percentage points higherthan the overall U.S. rate (Figure 1).For a particular race group, pov-erty rates may dier by detailedrace or origin. Some detailed raceor origin groups are listed on theACS questionnaire such as Filipino,Native Hawaiian, or Puerto Rican.
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Poverty rates or Whites and Asians werenot statistically dierent rom one another.
Categories not listed may be hand-written and the responses tabulatedwithin major race groups. Povertydiered across detailed Asiangroups. Poverty rates also dieredby detailed Native Hawaiian andOther Paciic Islander groups.An estimated 17.6 percent o theNative Hawaiian and Other PaciicIslander population had incomebelow the poverty level over the2007 to 2011 period (Figure 2).Within this group, poverty ratesranged rom a low o 6.4 percentor Fijians to a high o about 18.0percent or Samoans and Tongans.
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 The largest detailed group, NativeHawaiian, had a poverty rate o 14.4 percent, a rate not statisti-cally dierent rom the U.S. aver-age or the total population. ForGuamanians or Chamorros, poverty
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Poverty rates or Samoans (17.6 percent)and Tongans (18.1 percent) were not statisti-cally dierent rom one another.
01020304050FijiansGuamanianor ChamorroTonganSamoanNative HawaiianNative Hawaiian and Other PacificIslander Total
Figure 2.
U.S. Poverty Rates for the Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander AlonePopulation and Selected Detailed Groups: 2007–2011
(For information on confidentiality protection, sampling error, nonsampling error, and definitions, see
www.census.gov/acs/www/ 
)Percent below poverty
Note: Persons who report only one race among the six defined categories are referred to as the race-alone population, while personswho report more than one race category are referred to as the Two or More Races population. This figure shows data using therace-alone approach. Use of the single-race population does not imply that it is the preferred method of presenting or analyzing data.The Census Bureau uses a variety of approaches.Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2007–2011 American Community Survey.

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