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Regulation of Greenhouse Gases

Regulation of Greenhouse Gases

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Published by ALEC
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is moving full steam ahead on regulating GHGs under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The principal human emitted GHGs include carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and fluorinated gases.
The EPA blames these gases for the increase in global temperature over the past 100 years. EPA finalized first-ever rules for reducing GHGs from automobiles and light-duty trucks in May 2010, and has moved to implement a program of regulating GHGs from stationary sources on two different tracks throughout 2011 with final rules
expected in 2012.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is moving full steam ahead on regulating GHGs under the Clean Air Act (CAA). The principal human emitted GHGs include carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and fluorinated gases.
The EPA blames these gases for the increase in global temperature over the past 100 years. EPA finalized first-ever rules for reducing GHGs from automobiles and light-duty trucks in May 2010, and has moved to implement a program of regulating GHGs from stationary sources on two different tracks throughout 2011 with final rules
expected in 2012.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: ALEC on Feb 21, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/31/2013

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REGULATION OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS (GHGS)WHAT IS IT?
The U.S. Environmental Protecon Agency (EPA)is moving full steam ahead on regulang GHGsunder the Clean Air Act (CAA). The principalhuman emied GHGs include carbon dioxide,methane, nitrous oxide, and uorinated gases.The EPA blames these gases for the increasein global temperature over the past 100 years.EPA nalized rst-ever rules for reducing GHGsfrom automobiles and light-duty trucks in May2010, and has moved to implement a program of regulang GHGs from staonary sources on twodierent tracks throughout 2011 with nal rulesexpected in 2012.
BACKGROUND
EPA’s GHG perming program, which applies tonew and substanally upgraded sources that emitGHGs above certain thresholds, began on January2, 2010. This covers pre-construcon permitsunder the Prevenon of Signicant Deterioraon(PSD) poron of New Source Review as well asoperang permits under Title V. EPA is poised toroll out GHG New Source Performance Standards(NSPS) for power plants and reneries in 2012.In late December of 2010, EPA announced that ithad seled ligaon with states and environmentalgroups, agreeing to propose GHG performancestandards for fossil fuel power plants in July of 2011 and petroleum reneries in December of 2011. Both of these deadlines have been delayedby EPA into 2012. In the selement, the EPAcommied to nal rules for both types of faciliesby May 26, 2012. Crically, unlike the PSD and TitleV regulaons, the power plant NSPS regulaonswill govern new and upgraded facilies as well asexisng facilies, whether or not they upgrade.Thus, the NSPS regulaons are a key tool for EPAto get at the exisng eet of coal-red electricgenerang facilies.As noted, EPA’s rst step in its planned GHGprogram is regulaon under the PSD and TitleV permit programs. The inial target of thisprogram is large industrial, electric generaonand manufacturing facilies; over me, EPA plansfurther rulemaking to expand the universe of regulated facilies. Because the economy runson fossil fuels and because carbon dioxide is theinevitable byproduct of combusng fossil fuels,EPA’s claim of authority to regulate GHGs givesit an unprecedented ability to control virtuallyevery facet of American life. EPA is consideringregulaon of everything from ships and boats,to planes, cars and trucks, agricultural facilies,mining, movable equipment of every stripe (fromforklis to lawnmowers), and more regulaonson manufacturing and industrial facilies, andcommercial and industrial buildings.
WHO IS AFFECTED?
Energy is the lifeblood of the economy.Everything Americans buy, consume, produce,and transport requires energy. This meansanything that uses or requires energy to beproduced will increase in cost.The EPA failed to study the overall cost of itsGHG regulaons but esmates from a variety of perspecves suggest a substanal price tag.
 
Dr. Roger Bezdek of the economic research rmManagement Informaon Services, Inc. compiled avariety of analyses on GHG regulaon, concludingthat the EPA approach would:• Reduce Gross Domesc Product every year forthe next two decades, with GDP dropping $500billion by 2030;• Reduce U.S. employment, culminang in the lossof 2.5 million jobs by 2030;• Reduce U.S. household incomes, with averagehousehold income dropping by about $1,200annually by 2030;• Increase U.S. energy costs, with increases of 50percent for gasoline and residenal electricityprices, 75 percent for industrial electricity pricesand residenal natural gas prices, and 600 percentfor electric ulity coal prices.
WHY IS THIS UNNECESSARY?
There are three major reasons that suggest that,even if things to according to EPA plans, the impacton GHG emissions will be minimal.First, the EPA admits that their CAA requirementswill only achieve at best a 5 percent reducon inU.S. GHGs, a drop in the global climate bucket.EPA’s Federal Register entry accompanying therule regulang GHG emissions from new carsand light-duty trucks found that: “[G]lobal meantemperature is esmated to be reduced by 0.006to 0.015 [degrees] C by 2100… and sea-level riseis projected to be reduced by approximately 0.06 – 0.14 cm by 2100.” As the minority sta of theSenate Environment and Public Works Commieenotes, “[t]his amount is so miniscule it can’t evenbe measured by a ground-based thermometer.”Second, growing, unmigated emissions bydeveloping countries will overwhelm even the mostsevere unilateral GHG reducons. U.S. emissionsare likely to remain relavely at, while developingcountry emissions will grow exponenally over thenext century (further compounded by the fact thatChina’s faster growth of electricity demand comesfrom more than 70 percent coal-red generaon).Even based on EPA’s own analysis, unilateralAmerican reducon in GHGs has a negligibleimpact on atmospheric concentraons.Third, there is a signicant risk that carbonleakage (in which energy-intensive industries shiproducon overseas to avoid costly regulaon) willwipe out even the modest eect esmated by EPA.Essenally EPA regulaon of GHGs is all cost andno benet.
TAKE ACTION
• ALEC model legislaon that addresses GHGregulaon:•Resolution opposing EPA’s RegulatoryTrain Wreck•State Regulatory Responsibility Act•Resolution in Opposition to the EPA’s“Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule” and thetreatment of biomass energy•Resolution in Opposition to EPA’sRegulation of Greenhouse Gases fromMobile Sources•Resolution in Opposition to EPA’s Planto Regulate Greenhouse Gases Under theClean Air Act•Resolution in Opposition of CarbonDioxide Emission Standards•Write focused, joint letters to members of Congress•Write an op-ed or pursue other pressopportunies highlighng the impact of thisregulaon.For more informaon about the EPA’s GreenhouseGas Regulaon, contact Todd Wynn, Director of ALEC’s Energy, Environment and Agriculture TaskForce, at 202.742.8542 or twynn@alec.org
REGULATION OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS (GHGS)

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