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The Martin JRM Mars Flying Boat - Commercial Projects of 1944

The Martin JRM Mars Flying Boat - Commercial Projects of 1944

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Published by Jared Zichek
This is an excerpt from the inaugural issue of The American Aerospace Archive presenting a reprint of a lavish promotional brochure from 1944 of the Martin JRM Mars Transport Airplane, a commercialized version of the world’s largest production flying boat. The magazine covers three proposed versions of this luxurious “flying hotel” with 65 stunning color illustrations and photos throughout. A beautiful artifact from a vanished era, this 36 page monograph is printed in brilliant full color on high quality 80 lb semi-gloss paper with saddle-stitched covers.
This is an excerpt from the inaugural issue of The American Aerospace Archive presenting a reprint of a lavish promotional brochure from 1944 of the Martin JRM Mars Transport Airplane, a commercialized version of the world’s largest production flying boat. The magazine covers three proposed versions of this luxurious “flying hotel” with 65 stunning color illustrations and photos throughout. A beautiful artifact from a vanished era, this 36 page monograph is printed in brilliant full color on high quality 80 lb semi-gloss paper with saddle-stitched covers.

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Published by: Jared Zichek on Feb 28, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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07/25/2013

 
M
ARTIN
JRM M
ARS
F
LYING
B
OAT
OMMERCIAL
ROJECTS
 
OF 
1944
Jared A. Zichek 
A
MERICAN
A
EROSPACE
A
RCHIVE
1
 
The American Aerospace Archive is published periodically by Jared A. Zichek (6021 La Jolla Hermosa Ave, La Jolla, California 92037) and is printed and distributed by MagCloud (www.jaredzichek.magcloud.com). American Aerospace Archive Number 1.01 (ISSN 1943-9636) is copyright 2008 by Jared A. Zichek. All rights reserved. All featured text and images are copyright 2008 their respective copyright holders. Reproduction of any material in part or in whole without its creator's permission is strictly forbidden. The Ameri-can Aerospace Archive accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photos, art or other materials. Submissions are considered on an invitational basis only. Email  your comments and suggestions to editor@aeroarchivepress.com and visit our website at www.aeroarchivepress.com.
ABOVE:
  Title page o the lavish 1944marketing brochure or the commer-cialized Martin JRM Mars Flying Boat. The original document was printed inan oversized, landscape ormat and hasbeen adapted to t the smaller con-nes o this publication. The brochurewas ound in the National Archives, RG72, and all images and inormation pre-sented herein originate rom it.
COVER:
 Artist's impression o the com-mercial Martin Mars Transport in pseu-do-Pan Am markings.
oered superior economy, saety anddependability. Hal o the Mars' grossweight was disposable load. It oeredgreat capacity or cargo and greatercomort or passengers than any otherexisting airplane. Te rst Martin Marshad already set many world records; thecommercial version was capable o ex-ceeding them.
General Description
Te Mars ransport possessed greatload carrying capability, tremendoussize, and economy o operation. Itsnormal gross weight was 165,000 lbs.Te two-deck hull alone—exclusive o the wing—contained 15,600 cubic eetwithin its 120 oot length. ranslatedinto terms o transport, the Mars had ad-equate space to carry the enormous loado 25,500 lbs o cargo and 105 passengersor a distance o 1,500 statute miles or9,050 lbs o cargo and 60 passengers ora distance o 3,500 miles.Te Mars eatured a semi-mono-coque constructed hull. Four mainwater-tight bulkheads, closely spacedormer rames and stringers providedthe strength or the Mars' load-carryingability. All sheet material in the wing andhull was 24 S or SR alclad aluminumalloy. Stringers were either o ormed al-clad sheet or extruded 24 S material.Te Mars was a high-wing type o ying boat. Te wing was o the time-proven, two-spar type with stressed skincover. Both spars were o the tensioneld type, with no cut-outs except whereaccess holes were provided or passage o the crew. Both top and bottom coverswere o the at sheet-stringer type. Teupper cover was unique in that the covergauge and string spacing were adjustedso that no wrinkles appeared in the skinat ull design load. Te nose skin wasalso designed to be non-wrinkling at 1.5times the ight actor.
I
n 1944, the Martin Mars was the larg-est and longest-range production y-ing boat in the world. Initially con-ceived in 1938 as a patrol bomber, thetype was subsequently converted to thetransport role. Te marketing brochurereproduced over the ollowing pagespresents several interior designs or acommercial version—all-passenger,all-cargo, and passenger-cargo arrange-ments. Martin claimed that "competentauthorities" recognized these arrange-ments as "outstanding contributions tomodern transportation."By 1944, the Martin Mars prototypehad been built, tested, and largely prov-en. It was in over-ocean service withthe US Navy, carrying war materiel andtroops. wenty more were being rushedto completion or the Naval Air rans-port Service—then one o the two largestairlines in the world, the other being PanAm, the main target o Martin's market-ing eorts. (Tis order was later reducedto 5 at the end o the war).Te Mars ransport was the climaxo years o Martin's development andexperience in the design and buildingo ying boats; the aircra oered "newand practical horizons" to those whowere "planning the air lines o peace."Martin claimed that the ying boat2
 
Additional payload space was pro- vided in the cargo bays built into thewings. Tese bays were readily acces-sible by the use o ingenious elevatorswhich hoisted cargo into the wings.Te vastness o the Mars wasmatched by its rugged strength. In stren-uous tests and ull load dives the Marshad withstood strains o upwards o hal a million pounds on its wing. Te hullbottom had resisted equally heavy loadsand impacts in landing in high seas. Instructure as well as in design, the MartinMars ransport incorporated the mostadvanced developments in aviation ex-perience.Unortunately or Martin, airlineswere not convinced by the company'smarketing prowess, preerring theeconomy and practicality o land-basedairliners over large ying boats in thepostwar era. Furthermore, the concepto the "ying hotel" would be supersededby less luxurious high volume passengerservice targeted at the middle class. TeJRM Mars would go on to serve the Navy admirably in the transport role until1956, with only one being lost in an acci-dent. In 1959, Flying ankers, Inc. pur-chased the our remaining surplus yingboats and employed them in the waterbomber role to control orest res. As o 2008, two survive in this role with Coul-son Flying ankers in British Columbia.A man could walk erect within thesix-oot thick center portion o the wing,which spanned an impressive 200 . Mi-nor adjustments to engine and accesso-ries could be made in ight. Power wassupplied by our engines—each develop-ing 3,000 horsepower. Te total 12,000horsepower was more than three timesthat o a giant two-car diesel-electric lo-comotive.wo complete decks extended al-most the ull length o the hull. Tey provided exible and economic useo the space or disposal o either pas-sengers or cargo. On the upper deck,orward o the ront wing spar, was theight deck—nerve center o the ship.Tis ight deck, 30 x 12  was com-parable to the bridge o a large suraceship, and provided accommodations ordesks, instrument panels, comortablechairs and everything necessary or theefcient operation o the ship and thecomort o the ight crew.Te remainder o the upper deck,and the entire lower deck were availableor transport requirements—either pas-senger, or cargo, or both. ypical interi-or arrangements are pictured on the ol-lowing pages. Variations were possible,according to the need. Te lower deck was specially stressed or heavy, concen-trated loads. Te upper deck had abun-dant space or lower density cargo.Tus, while it never became a luxuriouscommercial ying boat like the prewarBoeing 314, the Martin Mars ultimately ound success in a more critical role thatits makers never anticipated.
Sources:
Te Martin Mars ransport Airplane
, Baltimore:Te Glenn L. Martin Company, 1944
3
Retouched (and possibly staged) photo showing the terric load-carryingcapability o the Martin Mars, in this case the twin tail XPB2M-1R. Initiallyconceived in 1938 as a "fying dreadnought" or ocean patrol, it was subse-quently converted to a transport when its original role was deemed obsolete.

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