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Salthill-VOL1-12-Commission to INquire into child abuse

Salthill-VOL1-12-Commission to INquire into child abuse

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Published by James Dwyer
Salthill-VOL1-12-Commission to INquire into child abuse,Sister Xavier/Severia is Sister Alida of Goldenbridge, Father Stefano is Rosminian Provincial Father Patrick Pierce (Ferryhouse), Brother Bruno is Sean Barry (Ferryhouse), Father Luca is Father William McGonagle (School Daingean County Offaly), Sister Astrid is Sister Joseph Conception of Sister Josephs KIlkenny, Thomas Pleece is David Murphy, 'Peter Tade' is Myles Brady, 'Brother Dieter' is James Kelly (Our Lady of Good Counsel school at Lota, Cork), 'Brother Guthrie' is Brother Eunan (Lota), 'Brother Dax' is Christian Brother Maurice Tobin (Letterfrack), Mercy nun 'Resident Manager' is Sister Calida' is Mercy Sister Nora Wall (St Michaels Home Cappoquin Waterford), 'Sister Wilma' is Sister Stanislaus Kennedy (St Josephs Kilkenny), 'John Brander' is Donal Dunne
Salthill-VOL1-12-Commission to INquire into child abuse,Sister Xavier/Severia is Sister Alida of Goldenbridge, Father Stefano is Rosminian Provincial Father Patrick Pierce (Ferryhouse), Brother Bruno is Sean Barry (Ferryhouse), Father Luca is Father William McGonagle (School Daingean County Offaly), Sister Astrid is Sister Joseph Conception of Sister Josephs KIlkenny, Thomas Pleece is David Murphy, 'Peter Tade' is Myles Brady, 'Brother Dieter' is James Kelly (Our Lady of Good Counsel school at Lota, Cork), 'Brother Guthrie' is Brother Eunan (Lota), 'Brother Dax' is Christian Brother Maurice Tobin (Letterfrack), Mercy nun 'Resident Manager' is Sister Calida' is Mercy Sister Nora Wall (St Michaels Home Cappoquin Waterford), 'Sister Wilma' is Sister Stanislaus Kennedy (St Josephs Kilkenny), 'John Brander' is Donal Dunne

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: James Dwyer on May 23, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/11/2014

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12.0112.0212.0312.0412.0512.0612.07
Chapter 12
St Joseph’s Industrial School,Salthill (‘Salthill’), 1870–1995
Introduction
Oral hearings were not held into Salthill, and this chapter is based on an analysis of relevantdocuments, including those obtained by the discovery process from the Christian Brothers, theDepartment of Education and Science, the Bishop of Galway and the Health Service Executive(formerly the Western Health Board) and submissions from the Christian Brothers.
Establishment 
St Joseph’s Industrial School, Salthill (‘Salthill’) traced its history back to 1870, when a publicmeeting in the Town Hall in Galway approved a proposal to establish an industrial school for boysand appointed a committee to implement the project. Land and premises were acquired in Salthillin June 1871 and were adapted to accommodate 50 boys.The Patrician Brothers agreed to manage the School under a committee of laymen and religious.The purpose of the School was to take in ‘neglected, orphaned, and abandoned Roman Catholicboys, in order to safeguard them from developing criminal tendencies and to prepare them for theworld of industry’. According to the School annals, on 25
th
September 1871, ‘twenty-one poor boyswere admitted to the School, most of them in the lowest state of destitution and misery’.The School got off to a difficult start, and initial reports from the Inspector for Industrial andReformatory Schools were negative. There were problems with management in the School whichcaused the Patrician Brothers to withdraw. The Government Inspector, Mr John Lentaigne, calledto the Superior General of the Christian Brothers in July 1876 and asked him to take over therunning of Salthill.The Christian Brothers inspected the premises and set out the terms upon which they wouldundertake the management of the School, and these were agreed with the Bishop. By the termsof this agreement, the Congregation held the property with the Bishop of Galway under a trust, ofwhich the Bishop and two members of the Congregation were the perpetual trustees.All existing debts and liabilities were paid by the committee that had originally set up the School,and an overdraft facility was set up in the local bank.The Brother in charge was designated the Resident Manager and it was agreed, ‘That he shallnot be obliged to furnish any other accounts to the Committee, or sub-managers, than thoseannually presented to government’.
CICA Investigation Committee Report Vol. I 
523
 
12.0812.0912.1012.1112.1212.1312.1412.15
Although this agreement clearly envisaged that the School would be run under the supervision ofa management committee, as required by the Industrial Schools Act (Ireland), 1868, such acommittee was never put in place by the Congregation and it ran the School in the same way asit ran all its industrial schools.The population of the School rose rapidly in the early years, with the certified number increasingto 150 in 1879 and 200 in 1886. Through fund-raising activities the School facilities were extendedto accommodate the growing numbers, for example, a chapel and dining room were built from theprofits of a three-day bazaar held in 1879. Workshops were built shortly after the ChristianBrothers took over. It was part of the agreement entered into with the Bishop that the diocesewould support fund-raising activity on behalf of the Brothers.The annals from these early years showed a great interest in the School from political and religiousleaders. The Duke of Edinburgh visited with a dozen army officers in attendance and, in 1895,both the Archbishop of Melbourne and Lord Carnarvon, the Lord Lieutenant, visited within a monthof each other. In 1887, the Papal Legate paid tribute to ‘this admirable institution and excellentestablishment’.After 1925, Salthill, like all industrial schools, came under the control of the Department ofEducation, and political interest in the School appeared to wane. There was no record in theannals of any leading politician visiting Salthill in the years following 1925.Renovations and redecoration of the premises took place in the 1940s as they had fallen intodisrepair. In 1943, Salthill was recognised by the Department of Education as a primary schoolwhich continued in existence until the early 1970s, when the remaining boys transferred to thelocal primary school.The Institution underwent a radical change in the early 1970s. The Kennedy Report, published in1970, had identified the problems inherent in the old institutionalised methods of childcare, andhad given the existing institutions no alternative but to change their structures radically. Allinstitutions either responded to this need for change or, like Artane, Tralee and Letterfrack,closed down.In 1973, a new Manager was appointed and he worked with the Department in bringing about thechanges that established the group home structure. The new Manager was more sensitive to theneeds of the boys, and had the assistance of a trained and experienced Brother who had takena special interest in childcare and had attended the Kilkenny course shortly after it commencedin the early 1970s.The transformation of St Joseph’s was completed in accordance with plans that were drawn upin 1987. Most of the land on which the School was located was sold for development and themoney was used to build a new complex planned on modern childcare principles. The Brothersceased to have an association with St Joseph’s in 1995. The centre now consists of two units,each catering for six young people with a staffing ratio of 1:1 and operated by the HealthService Executive.524
CICA Investigation Committee Report Vol. I 
 
12.16
The Committee received the following photograph and plan of Salthill:
Source:
The Morgan Collection, National Photographic Archive, Temple Bar, Dublin.
Source:
Congregation of Christian Brothers.
CICA Investigation Committee Report Vol. I 
525

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