Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Herbert Marcuse Interview in Psychology Today

Herbert Marcuse Interview in Psychology Today

Ratings: (0)|Views: 28 |Likes:
Published by Che Brandes-Tuka
On Revolutionary Eroticism, the Tactics of Terror, the Young, Psychotherapy, the Environment, Technology, Reich.
On Revolutionary Eroticism, the Tactics of Terror, the Young, Psychotherapy, the Environment, Technology, Reich.

More info:

Published by: Che Brandes-Tuka on Nov 20, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/09/2014

pdf

text

original

 
A Conversati
on
wi
th
by Sam Keen and John Raser
Revolut
ionary
Er
oticism, t
he
Tactics of Terror,
the
Yo
u
ng
, Psychotherapy,
the
Enviro
nment, Technol
ogy
Re
i
ch
.
ier
ber1
Marcuse: I hope you don
 t
t
to
ask me about
my
theories
:r
writings.
II
Is
useless for me
to
-y
to
elaborate what I have written.
• I could have said
it
more clearly I
wo
u
ld
hava: I still 1ry.
Nor
do
I
think
will be
par11cu
larly interesting to
::;J
k about my prlva1e psyche. I have
·.e
ver been analyzed. I apparently
: dn t need it. Psycholog
ic
ally, I hope,
am
not Interesting at all. I
am
fa
irly
·~
r
l
Sam
Keen: As o
public
phenome·
n you seem to have sprung full
;·o
wn from
the
head
of
Zeus
.
~
Jddenfy students In rebellion all
:-
.re
r tho wortd have c.taimed Herbert
a
rc:use
as an
ally
and a
major
rophet
of
tholr hoped-lor
new
age.
1
at
events nurtured
your
pass
ion·
ato
commitment to a revolutionary analysis
of
tho modern
world?
Marcuse: Well obviously
it
didn t
spring from
tho
head
of
Zeus, although
t
might seem like
it
since
my
books
have
only
recently become
popular hero
Bnd In Europe.
As
a young
stu·
dent I read Marx and what was then consider
ed
nva
nt
-garde l
it
erature. Koon: Do you reme
mb
er
a
tlmo
when you were not
an
intensely polltl··
co
l ond philosop
hica
l human being? What created your passion? Marcu
se:
My passion came from
my
personal experience
of
the
be-
trayal and dereat
of
the Germ
an
revo-
lution
and the
organization
of
the
fascist counterrevolution
which
even·
tually
brought Hitler
to
power. I was 20 when tho German revolution broke out. I was
In
the last h
alf
year of my army service and was stat
io
ned
In
Berlin. I
got
my first revolutionary oxporiance as a member
of
a
So
ldier
s
Council
but
It
was a
br
ie
f experience bocnuse the revolution was
quickly
betrayed. In 1919, I think, I
Jeh
Berlin and went
to
Frei
burg where
I became absorbed In
my
stt.Jdies
of
comparaUvo literature, philosophy and economics. I was relatively dormant
politically
for
the
next
4
years
until
I
lett Germany In
933
and
joined
the Institute
for
Social
Research
in
Geneva. Ourlng
the year
al
the
lnslitule
my political passion was reawakened
under the
Influence
of
my colleagues
Max Hork
·
helmer
and T.
W.
A
do
rno.
After
my
lmmlgra
llo
n
lo
Amer
ica In 1934, lhese
me
n, along with Hegel, Ma
rx
and Freud, continued to
be
the dominant Influences upon
my
lhoughl.
Recenlly thoro were differences between Hark
he
lmer and myself. Keen: What were these differences? Marcuse: We have
different
evaluations
of the
world-wide student
move-
ment and
of
the character
of
American politics. I see in
tho
student movement a
vilal
social and
politica
l force; my friends are reluctant to do so. They see
Amer
ica as a progressive and even
libe
ral society compared to
lho
Soviet Union. While I agree
wllh
their condemnation
of
tho Soviet
re
gime
and
agree that there are
sllll pro
gressive and
liberal
forces aclive
In
U.S. sociely, I see U
.S
. policies,
do
mestic as well as foreign, as syatomat-
35
 
eally ropreaalve
of
human freedom. John Reaer:
We
know that
the an·
: :hesls between repression and
fre&o
;o
m Ia
one
cornerstone
of
your
:-o
ught,
and
that
you
believe that
a
·
ad
i
cal
restructuring
of
society
Is
·
ees.sary
to
end represslon and
to
:;,erate
the human psyche.
But
short
:
this utopian restructuring
of
so
.
:
ety,
do
you
aeo
any role for psycho
.
-,
erapy In sowing the seeds of Iibera- o
n? Or do
y u
thi
nk
that t
he
r
apy
as
· is currently conceived and prac .
:ed
is In effect conformist, priva
.
·
.st
ic and an11revolulionary? Morcuoo: Obviously II psychiatry
e
rety helps
the
patient adjust
to
a
.:
k soci
ety
so that he can function
in
:
it
on
ly moves him from one kind
of
ek.ness
to
another.
Eve
n Freud ad-ned this,
but
rejected the idea that
;sy
choenalyote ohould make patients
·r
o revolutionaries
or
rebels against -air society. Freud
as
a person
may
·
av
e been bourgeois and conserve· --(e. Yet his theory contains tran
 
endlng
radical elements.
So
y u
ann
ot
say that Freudian theory and
:·ae
tfe
 e
are either conrormis't
or
non
::of
ormlst. They are both, and I
think
- Jthou
gh
Freud would reject
this-
-31
hi
s
dec
isive concepts are
deff~
-:ely revolutionary. Keen: I think that Freud, like Mel· e. was hauntod by dreams
of
both -e easy froodom
o'
the South Seas
:.~d
he chaotic terror of the peasant
:-J
olution. Raser: Perhaps traditional Amori
:.. .n
psychiatry suHers from the same
=~·
ee
t
as Freud
In
that
il
almost
to-
-.:
y
ig
nores tha political Implications : its th&Oty. Only you,
NQf'man
0.
:
-~wn
and perhaps
Erik
Erikson. -
. '•
e been
will
i
ng to
deal seriousJy :n
the political
implications
ot
=·eu
d'
s analysis or the repressed and :-erated psyche.
Marcuao: But
a
problem
arises
~re
Amorlcon socloty generates a
::
of pathology among Individual
s.
It
=
4
t:a
tes a lot
of
psyc
hic
casualties.
e
refora
Amorlcan psychiatrists
·_a.
e been overwhelmed with the need
:::
ue
at patients
who
simply cannot _ "'ction. It a person cannot digest,
if
· t
cannot eat. these functions have
::
J"e
restored and politics and social :
:'ls
ciousness have
to
be
excluded
--
e s
s they become essential for the
-;'ra
py,
Just
ns
o physician need not
»<
about tho moral
or
political opin· c-:s of a potlont
In
order to cure him
:-
one
umonla, so o psychiatrist usual·
ly
nood not traat the specific politics
of
a patient In order to cure
him
of
some psychosomatic illness.. You just c,an't say generally whether psychiatry is politically reactionary
or
conformi
st
Ruer:
You
mean
in
theory. You can.
I
th
ink, In practice. Mercuae: In what sense? Raaer: In Its fee structure, In
Ua
privati
sm,
In lis emphasis
on
the
r-
rection ol pathology rather then the stimulation
of
growth, and In Its habit
of
adjusting people
to
the existing world
of
work and soc
iaJ
injustice.
I
think one fa
ll
ing indication
of
the
apo
lit
ical stance
of
American therapftta
If
someone has to study a textbook on sexual behavior in order to learn how to make love to his wife
or
girl, something is wrong with him."
[s
evident
in
the fate
of
Wilhelm Reich. Reich Insisted upon a marriage between Freud and Marx, the
boCiy
and tho body politic. But Amerlcon Relohlans have all but ignored Rolch's political Insights and claimed only his analysis
of
tho physical dynamics
of
cl\aracter structure. Keen: That may be a rather pess
i
mi
stic
vkrw. I
th
i
nk
there are some
revolutio
n
ary
i
mplications
in
the
whole movement toward
group
ther
apy
. Psychology is becomi
ng
more
popular
and
vu
lga
r
in
a
posll
lve sense. Oon't you agree? Marcuao: I must
te
ll you that any thing I soy about
group
ther
apy
Is an lmportlnonce beca
us
e I have not studlod
l
I know about encounter and
ge~;talt
groups only from reports
of
the kinds
of
things that
go
on
there.
I
read the cataJogs
of
the Esaten lnstl·
tute.
To
me
this is sufficient
to
be
horrified. This administration
of
happiness
is
nauseating
to me
. They teach people
to
touch each
other
and
hold
hands If somebody cannot learn that by himself, by trial and orror, he may just
as
well
give
up. Raoar: But in point
of
fact a
lo
t
of
poople
In
our society ore afrnld
to
reach out and touch others. They re main Isolated, lonely end Insensitive. Marcuae: Then they are not going
to
ba helped
by
teami
ng
thasa things In a contrived and mechanical way. Such
th
i
ngs
have
to
coma out
of
a person. as
is
or her
own, without organization. Rooer: Let me offer a slightly
dlf·
ferent
perspective
about
the
slg·
nlflcance
of
these
sensltivlly
and
encounter groups. It Is a similar argu ment used by some apologists
for
LSO.
U a person has grown
up
In
a society where from Infancy his fan· taales and sensibilities have beon stifled,
he
may not even know what forms
of
lmaginatjon and Intimacy are possible. Some people have claimed that tho hallucinogenics
draw
asfde
the
curtain screening
off
a rich world or Imagination. In a similar way people
In
these groups can learn how to reach out and touch others. Marcuse: But you are always being touched today and slapped
on
tho shoulder and all
of
that whothor you want It
or
nol
Koon: But
if
a competitive society d
es
troys tenderness and Intimacy then perhaps
we
have
tou
socontrlved means
to
reawaken them. Marcuse: I
may
be
very wrong but I feel that a human being has
to
learn some things by himself.
If
someone has to study a textbook
on
sexual behavior In order
to
learn how
to
moko lovo
to
his wife
or
girl
, someth
in
g Is wrong with him. Keen: The analysis
of
shame you make
In
n
Essay
on
Liberation
soems
to
bear on
this subj
ect
. You say that a capi
ta
li
stic society takes the Oedipal situation and compounds
it
by
au·
thor
i
tarian
political
and economic
structures,, and thus psychological and political repression creates a personality that is deeply shamed and gu
llt
·r
ldden. If shame and guilt
cut us
ofl
from our sensibilitie
s,
doesn't It follow that a revolutionary form
of
37

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->