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OE Lessing [1920]: Traubel's Books Not Morbidly Adhesive

OE Lessing [1920]: Traubel's Books Not Morbidly Adhesive

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OE Lessing, a German Whitmanaut eventually horrified by the revelation that Whitman's Adhesiveness represented covert advocacy for same-sex passion, writes here: “The words friend and comrade as used by Traubel are entirely free from the sense of morbid “adhesiveness” that Whitman attached to them in his Calamus. This must be stated here, and cannot be stated emphatically enough, if Traubel is to be understood at all as a personality quite independent of Whitman.”
OE Lessing, a German Whitmanaut eventually horrified by the revelation that Whitman's Adhesiveness represented covert advocacy for same-sex passion, writes here: “The words friend and comrade as used by Traubel are entirely free from the sense of morbid “adhesiveness” that Whitman attached to them in his Calamus. This must be stated here, and cannot be stated emphatically enough, if Traubel is to be understood at all as a personality quite independent of Whitman.”

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Published by: Mitchell Santine Gould on Jan 05, 2014
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07/31/2014

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OE Lessing, a German Whitmanaut eventually horrified by the revelation that Whitman's Adhesiveness represented covert advocacy for same-sex passion, rites here! "#he ords friend and comrade as used by #raubel are entirely free from the sense of morbid "adhesiveness$ that Whitman attached to them in his
Calamus
% #his must be stated here, and cannot be stated emphatically enough, if #raubel is to be understood at all as a personality &uite independent of Whitman%$  (itchell )antine Gould
OE Lessing. “Horace Traubel [Parts 3 and 4].”
The Open Court 
, Volume 34 !"#$%, &'()). *igiti+ed  b -oogle oo/s 0 t1an/s, -oogle2 Edited b itc1ell antine -ould, curator, Lea5esO6-rass.Org. Possess t1e origin o6 all 7oems.HO89:E T89;EL< O. E. LE=>-.
[Part] III.
 >o 9merican 7ublis1er 1ad courage enoug1 to 7ublis1 at 1is o?n ris/ Horace Traubel@s collection o6 lrics. T1e a77earance o6
Optimos
[!#] ?as made 7ossible onl b means o6 7ri5ate subscri7tion, and it ma ?ell be doubted i6 an one else besides t1e subscribers e5er sa? a co7 o6 t1e  boo/ at all.T1e origin o6 t1e ?ord “O7timos” is 5er c1aracteristic o6 its creator. Ae 1a5e t1e aut1entic stor 6rom rs. ainB “9 learned admiring musician 6riend said laug1ing o5er itB @=t ?as di5ine im7ertinence. Ho? did ou dare to do itC@ Traubel, too, laug1ed. He said, nonc1alantlB @O1, = don@t /no?D i6 = don@t 6ind t1e ?ord = ?ant ?1en = ?ant a ?ord = ma/e it.@ @Ho? can ou usti6 suc1 a  7rocessC@ He ans?eredB @ ma/ing good.@ Traubel said to meB @8ead t1e 7oem ?it1 t1at title line
 
O7timos. =6 ou understand t1e 7oem ou ?ill ne5er again as/ t1e meaning o6 O7timos.@ 9nd 1e also saidB @=6 = can sa cosmos, meaning t1e ?1ole, ?1 s1ouldn@t = sa o7timos, meaning to s7ea/ o6 t1e c1eer6ul ?1oleC@”0:orrect or incorrect, beauti6ul or 1ideous, Traubel@s ne? ?ord ?ill li5e because t1e  boo/ ?1ic1 ?as so named ?ill li5e.
 Leaves of Grass
 is a t1eodic 6rom t1e 7oint o6 5ie? o6 su7er(dogmatic :1ristianit.
Optimos
 is a t1eodic 6rom t1e 7oint o6 5ie? o6 su7er(religious 1umanit. 9s
Chants Communal 
 and
Collects
 are arranged according to an artisticall concei5ed 7lan, so is
Optimos
. T1ere are nine se7arate but interrelated grou7s o6 7oems. T1e 6irst and t1e last grou7s deal ?it1 t1e general ideas o6 a monistic and o7timistic 71iloso71, “9 great lig1t ?as 7assed to me” and “E5ert1ing goes bac/ to its 7lace.” T1e second grou7, “T1e golden age is in m 1eart to(da,” a77lies t1at 71iloso71 to t1e general 71enomena o6 7resent(da li6e. T1e t1ird grou7, “Fust to o?n m o?n soul,” e)7resses t1e sel6(assertion o6 t1e indi5idual soul. T1e 6ourt1 grou7, “e6ore boo/s and a6ter  boo/s,” s1o?s t1e ?a to t1e realit o6 t1e 7oet@s ideal o6 li6e as it mani6ests itsel6 in e)ternal 6orms. T1e 6i6t1 grou7, “To ou, going or coming, O ?oman,” com7arable to A1itman@s
Children of Adam
,  7roclaims t1e 6reedom o6 ?oman and t1e sanctit o6 se)ual lo5e. T1en 6ollo? 7oems o6 lo5e, “= go ?1ere m 1eart goes”D o6 6riends1i7, “Ae are ust brot1ers”D and o6 democrac, “T1e 7eo7le are t1e masters o6 li6e.”T1e attenti5e reader soon disco5ers t1at t1e boo/ com7rises man ears and 5arious 71ases o6 t1e aut1or@s 7ersonal li6e. T1ere are, as ?e 1a5e seen, a 6e? 7oems 5er clearl in6luenced b A1itman  bot1 in 6orm and in s7irit. esides t1ose alread mentioned. “O anterior soul” ma ser5e as an illustration. A1itmanesGue are t1e r1t1m, t1e man re7etitions and enumerations, t1e 7arent1etic Guestions, t1e 1esitating Guali6ications o6 statements, t1e e)clamationsB
"* am balanced in the gases, the boiling cauldron sings in infinite space, * am safe in the fire, * ascend the
 
slopes of flame!O sun's-self+O nebulous prophecies+O solace of promised restoration* al erect, * trade, * am the layer in the court, * labor ith the chain-gang, * am sailor and soldier% * do not stopto count the years of the .ourney!Why should * stop for that hich never stops, for that as to hich * am unconcerned/$
T1ere is in t1is 7oem an element o6 msticism more intimatel related to A1itman t1an merel  b similarit o6 e)7ressionB
"#here is a figure on the height!* see it+O it embraces me*t presses a iss to my lips,*t sets me sail on immortal seas% %%%*t, the anterior soul, taing me, ho am god, bac to god,*mmersing the ubi&uitous life in its on aters%$
=6 some 7arts o6 t1e 7oem sound li/e t1e “ong o6 sel6,” its general trend o6 t1oug1t suggestst1e s7irit o6 t1e “Passage to =ndia.” To A1itman, immortalit means t1e e5erlasting li6e o6 t1e indi5idual soul, o6 t1e “single se7arate 7erson,” ?1ic1 al?as 1as been and ?ill 6ore5er be an “identit.” A1itman@s msticism, t1ere6ore, is t1e intuiti5e consciousness and ecstatic 6eeling o6 t1e soul@s solidarit ?it1 all ot1er identities souls, 7ersons% rat1er t1an an
unio mystica
 ?1ic1 in e66ect is t1e total absor7tion o6 indi5idual e)istence b “-od.” ome1o?, 1e belie5es, t1ere ?ill ta/e 7lace, or ista/ing 7lace, a gradual de5elo7ment o6, and ?it1in, t1at identit to?ard a more and more 7er6ect state o6 s7irituali+ation in t1e beond. =t is t1e :1ristian conce7tion o6 an eternal li6e in Hea5en in t1e sig1t o6 -od, gi5en a 71iloso71ical as7ect b 5ague reminiscences o6 Leibni+@s monadolog.Traubel, until t1e second 1al6 o6 t1e @nineties, s7o/e t1e language, and seemed to s1are t1e religious 6ait1, o6 t1at msticism ?1ic1 is msticism onl in name, since its real nature is dualistic and transcendental or e5en, i6 ?e acce7t *r. ert+@s 7lausible analsis,[!3] 7olt1eistic. Ho?e5er,

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