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Statia News No. 12

Statia News No. 12

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,100|Likes:
Published by Marnix Jansen
INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER
STATIA NEWS
VOLUME 1,
ISSUE 012

12 A UGUST 17, 2009 Summer Special, the story of Françoise and her Roses, by Walter Hellebrand, page 2,3 Clyde van Putten explains, Page 4,5 Renovating the Methodist School, Page 5 Introducing Marga Drewes, Page 6 Plan Prevention and Youthcare plan, Page 7 Koninkrijkscompiment for SECAR, Page 8

E DITORIAL
The Carnival Survivors were leading the Carnival Parade, more Carnival pictures on page 13—15

Summer is at its’ end.   Schoo
INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER
STATIA NEWS
VOLUME 1,
ISSUE 012

12 A UGUST 17, 2009 Summer Special, the story of Françoise and her Roses, by Walter Hellebrand, page 2,3 Clyde van Putten explains, Page 4,5 Renovating the Methodist School, Page 5 Introducing Marga Drewes, Page 6 Plan Prevention and Youthcare plan, Page 7 Koninkrijkscompiment for SECAR, Page 8

E DITORIAL
The Carnival Survivors were leading the Carnival Parade, more Carnival pictures on page 13—15

Summer is at its’ end.   Schoo

More info:

Published by: Marnix Jansen on Sep 13, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/12/2014

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INDEPENDENT
 
NEWSLETTER
 
A
UGUST
17, 2009V
OLUME
1,
ISSUE
12
S
TATIA
N
EWS
 
E
DITORIAL
 
Summer
 
is
 
at
 
its’
 
end.
 
Schools
 
started
 
today.
 
Not
 
in
 
St.
 
Maar
ten
 
and
 
Saba,
 
they
 
start
 
tomorrow,
 
they
 
were
 
afraid
 
“Ana”,
 
the
 
first
 
tropical
 
storm
 
would
 
be
 
too
 
fierce.
 
Statia’s
 
schools
 
started
 
as
 
scheduled
 
and
 
they
 
did
 
without
 
a
 
sigh
 
of 
 
wind.
 
Statianews
 
is
 
getting
 
a
 
grip
 
on
 
what
 
is
 
about
 
to
 
happen
 
for
 
our
 
youth.
 
This,
 
because
 
of 
 
the
 
talks
 
with
 
Hemmie
 
van
 
Xanten
 
and
 
Marga
 
Drewes,
 
kwartierma
kers
 
for
 
Education
 
and
 
Youth
 
and
 
Family
 
Care.
 
See
 
page
 
6,7
 
and
 
9.
 
As
 
promised,
 
Clyde
 
van
 
Putten
 
explains
 
his
 
remarks
 
about
 
Henk
 
Kamp
 
(page
 
4,5)
 
If 
 
you
 
want
 
to
 
know
 
how
 
close
 
the
 
other
 
two
 
storms
 
that
 
are
 
coming
 
our
 
way
 
are,
 
check
 
www.stormcarib.com
 
When
 
Statianews
 
had
 
the
 
interview
 
with
 
Clyde
 
van
 
Putten
 
he
 
said
 
he
 
did
 
not
 
pre
pare
 
for
 
the
 
storm.
 
 
God
 
has
 
no
 
reason
 
to
 
punish
 
us…..”
 
I
 
asked
 
him
 
if 
 
he
 
believed
 
God
 
had
 
any
thing
 
to
 
do
 
with
 
the
 
storms.
 
He
 
said
 
God’s
 
spririt
 
will
 
be
 
in
 
them...
 
God
 
or
 
no
 
God
 
in
 
the
 
storms,
 
until
 
now,
 
we
 
are
 
pretty
 
save
 
here
 
on
 
our
 
little
 
island.
 
I
 
hope
 
you
 
enoy
 
Statianews,
 
see
 
you
 
in
 
two
 
weeks,
 
Annemieke
 
Kusters
 
O
 
Yes,
 
I
 
decided
 
never
 
to
 
use
 
the
 
word
 
BES
 
again.
 
(see
 
Page
 
10,11)
 
Summer Special, thestory of Françoiseand her Roses, byWalter Hellebrand, page 2,3Clyde van Puttenexplains, Page 4,5 Renovating the Methodist School,Page 5 Introducing Marga Drewes, Page Plan Preventionand Youthcare plan, Page 7 Koninkrijkscompi-ment for SECAR,Page 8 New Fact s About  Education, Page 9Opinion: One, Twi-ce, Three Times an Island, Page 10,11The Way I See It, by Alida Franicis, Pa-ge 12Football on Statia,Page 13Carnival on Statia,Page 14, 15, 16  Announcements,Page 17 
The Carnival Survivors were leading the Carnival Parade,more Carnival pictures on page 13—15
 
F
RANCOISE
 
AND
 
HER
R
OSES
:
A
W
OMAN
B
EATING
 
THE
 O
DDS
 
IN
 
THE
17
TH
C
ENTURY
C
ARIBBEAN
- P
ART
2
P
AGE
2
S
UMMER
S
PECIAL
 
S
TATIA
N
EWS
 
diers
 
had
 
to
 
hold
 
on
 
to
 
each
 
other
 
to
 
climb
 
up
 
a
 
high
 
mountain
 
(at
 
Jenkins
 
Bay?).
 
After
 
some
 
intense
 
fighting,
 
they
 
managed
 
to
 
hole
 
up
 
the
 
English
 
inside
 
Fort
 
Oranje
 
and
 
drive
 
them
 
to
 
the
 
point
 
of 
 
surren
der.
 
And
 
then
 
...
 
the
 
French
 
appeared.
 
Where
 
did
 
they
 
come
 
from?
 
“Gotcha!”
 
When
 
the
 
Lieutenant
General
 
of 
 
French
 
Guyana,
 
Antoine
 
Le
 
Febvre
 
de
 
la
 
Barre,
 
arrived
 
in
 
St.
 
Kitts
 
with
 
his
 
fleet
 
a
 
few
 
days
 
after
 
the
 
Dutch
 
departed
 
for
 
Statia,
 
he
 
was
 
told
 
about
 
the
 
expedition.
 
He
 
decided
 
to
 
send
 
‘assistance.’
 
His
 
son
 
in
 
law,
 
D’Or
villiers
 
was
 
dispatched
 
to
 
Statia
 
with
 
about
 
100
 
men.
 
They
 
could
 
easily
 
land
 
as
 
all
 
the
 
British
 
were
 
locked
 
up
 
in
 
Fort
 
Oranje
 
and
 
all
 
the
 
Dutch
 
were
 
busy
 
holding
 
them
 
there.
 
The
 
French
 
marched
 
up
 
to
 
the
 
Fort
 
 –
 
only
 
to
 
find
 
the
 
Dutch
 
 just
 
finalising
 
their
 
negotiations
 
with
 
the
 
British.
 
The
 
latter
 
were
 
ready
 
to
 
surrender,
 
only
 
waiting
 
for
 
the
 
conditions
 
to
 
be
 
put
 
to
 
paper
 
and
 
then
 
sign
 
them.
 
But
 
now
 
the
 
British
 
had
 
a
 
choice
 
to
 
whom
 
to
 
sur
render
 
 –
 
and
 
they
 
preferred
 
the
 
French
 
to
 
the
 
Dutch.
 
At
 
least
 
that
 
is
 
the
 
French
 
version
 
of 
 
the
 
story.
 
According
 
to
 
the
 
Dutch,
 
they
 
were
 
tricked
 
out
 
of 
 
the
 
final
 
victory
 
by
 
the
 
French.
 
D’Orvilliers
 
had
 
requested
 
if 
 
he
 
could
 
have
 
the
 
privilege
 
to
 
be
 
the
 
first
 
to
 
march
 
his
 
troops
 
into
 
the
 
fort.
 
It
 
was
 
granted
 
to
 
him.
 
And
 
 
“gotcha”!
 
Once
 
inside,
 
he
 
closed
 
the
 
gate
 
and
 
forced
 
the
 
English
 
to
 
surrender
 
to
 
the
 
By
 
Walter
 
Hellebrand
 
In
 
Part
 
1
 
of 
 
´
Françoise
 
and 
 
her 
 
Roses´ 
 
(www.
 
Etc)
 
we
 
saw
 
how
 
the
 
little
 
girl
 
Francisca
 
Vaz
 
left
 
North
East
 
Brazil
 
around
 
1655
 
when
 
this
 
Dutch
 
colony
 
became
 
Portuguese
 
again.
 
The
 
Dutch
 
 –
 
as
 
well
 
as
 
the
 
Jews
 
living
 
under
 
their
 
protection
were
 
expelled.
 
Whereas
 
one
 
of 
 
her
 
fellow
 
refugees,
 
Roche
 
‘Brasiliano’
 
(originally
 
from
 
Groningen),
 
resorted
 
to
 
an
 
adventurous
 
life
 
as
 
an
 
(in)famous
 
pirate,
 
the
 
Vaz’s
 
came
 
to
 
settle
 
in
 
Statia.
 
Here,
 
the
 
‘Brasiliana’
 
blossomed
 
into
 
the
 
young
 
lady
 
Françoise.
 
In
 
1666,
 
when
 
she
 
was
 
about
 
21
 
years
 
old,
 
with
 
her
 
family
 
trying
 
to
 
cope
 
with
 
the
 
ravages
 
caused
 
by
 
two
 
Eng
lish
 
attacks
 
in
 
two
 
consecutive
 
years,
 
a
 
bizarre
 
situa
tion
 
was
 
to
 
change
 
her
 
life.
 
Dutch
 
refugees
 
in
 
St.
 
Kitts
 
It
 
was
 
refugees
 
from
 
Brazil
 
like
 
the
 
Vaz’s
 
who
 
introduced
 
the
 
knowledge
 
of 
 
cul
tivating
 
and
 
refin
ing
 
sugar
 
 –
 
along
 
with
 
the
 
need
 
for
 
slave
 
labour
 
from
 
Africa.
 
However,
 
the
 
development
 
of 
 
the
 
sugar
 
busi
ness
 
in
 
Statia
 
had
 
been
 
dealt
 
a
 
se
vere
 
blow
 
by
 
the
 
English
 
raid
 
of 
 
1664
 
and
 
the
 
Eng
lish
 
occupation
 
of 
 
1665
 
when
 
most
 
of 
 
the
 
sugar
 
in
stallations
 
were
 
taken
 
away
 
as
 
booty.
 
Twice
 
in
 
two
 
years,
 
the
 
inhabitants
 
had
 
to
 
start
 
from
 
scratch.
 
And
 
then
 
in
 
November
 
1666,
 
the
 
French
 
and
 
the
 
Dutch
 
stood
 
in
 
front
 
of 
 
the
 
gate
 
of 
 
Fort
 
Oranje
 
at
 
the
 
same
 
time,
 
both
 
demanding
 
the
 
surrender
 
of 
 
the
 
British
 
garrison.
 
On
 
their
 
way
 
to
 
Statia,
 
the
 
Dutch
 
had
 
stopped
 
over
 
in
 
French
 
St.
 
Kitts
 
and
 
had
 
told
 
the
 
Gov
ernor
 
of 
 
their
 
plan
 
to
 
retake
 
Statia.
 
He
 
promised
 
his
 
support.
 
With
 
the
 
help
 
of 
 
Dutch
 
refugees
 
from
 
Statia
 
in
 
St.
 
Kitts
 
who
 
knew
 
the
 
less
 
obvious
 
landing
 
places,
 
the
 
Dutch
 
managed
 
to
 
put
 
troops
 
ashore.
 
The
 
sol
August 17, 2009
Roche
 
Brasiliano,
 
like
 
Francoise
 
a
 
refugee
 
from
 
Dutch
 
Brazil,
 
became
 
a
 
feared
 
pirate
 
after
 
the
 
Portuguese
 
murdered
 
his
 
family.
 
The
 
Dutch
 
landing
 
of 
 
1666
 
may
 
well
 
have
 
been
 
at
 
Jenk
ins
 
Bay
 
where
 
the
 
soldiers
 
had
 
to
 
“hold
 
on
 
to
 
each
 
other
 
to
 
climb
 
up
 
a
 
high
 
mountain.”
 
 
 
P
AGE
3
S
UMMER
S
PECIAL
 
S
TATIA
N
EWS
 
Who
 
was
 
this
 
Gabriel
 
Folio,
 
“Lord
 
of 
 
the
 
Roses”?
 
He
 
was
 
born
 
in
 
France,
 
about
 
twenty
 
years
 
before
 
Françoise.
 
He
 
made
 
his
 
debut
 
in
 
history
 
in
 
1664
 
as
 
captain
 
of 
 
a
 
company
 
of 
 
soldiers
 
in
 
Guadeloupe.
 
The
 
French
 
West
 
India
 
Company
 
had
 
 just
 
been
 
cre
ated
 
in
 
imitation
 
of 
 
the
 
Dutch
 
one
 
and
 
was
 
taking
 
over
 
the
 
French
 
islands
 
from
 
their
 
previous
 
private
 
owners.
 
The
 
representative
 
of 
 
the
 
Company
 
in
 
the
 
Caribbean
 
wrote
 
to
 
Louis
 
XIV’s
 
minister
 
Colbert
 
that
 
he
 
wanted
 
to
 
keep
 
Des
 
Roses
 
in
 
his
 
position
 
as
 
cap
tain
 
as
 
he
 
was
 
“a
 
soldier
 
whom
 
you
 
could
 
post
 
in
 
a
 
place
 
where
 
no
 
one
 
else
 
would
 
want
 
to
 
stay
 
and
 
he
 
knew
 
how
 
to
 
defend
 
himself 
 
well.”
 
The
 
same
 
year,
 
he
 
was
 
sent
 
out
 
to
 
defend
 
Marie
Galante
 
against
 
the
 
English
 
and
 
was
 
left
 
in
 
com
mand
 
of 
 
this
 
island.
 
In
 
September
 
1665,
 
Des
 
Roses,
 
“a
 
consci
entious
 
man,’
 
was
 
made
 
Commander
 
of 
 
French
 
St.
 
Martin.
 
The
 
following
 
year,
 
he
 
was
 
ordered
 
by
 
the
 
governor
 
of 
 
the
 
French
 
West
 
Indies
 
to
 
transport
 
all
 
the
 
inhabitants
 
of 
 
St.
 
Martin
 
and
 
St.
 
Barth’s
 
to
 
French
 
St.
 
Kitts.
 
Des
 
Roses
 
(“one
 
of 
 
the
 
bravest
 
of 
 
our
 
Americans”
 
according
 
to
 
the
 
French
 
historian
 
Dutertre)
 
took
 
ad
vantage
 
of 
 
the
 
boats
 
that
 
were
 
sent
 
to
 
him
 
for
 
this
 
purpose
 
and
 
used
 
them
 
to
 
launch
 
an
 
expedition
 
against
 
the
 
English
 
in
 
Anguilla.
 
He
 
took
 
three
 
can
ons
 
and
 
two
 
prisoners
 
from
 
the
 
island.
 
On
 
the
 
horizon,
 
visible
 
from
 
the
 
island
 
where
 
Des
 
Roses
 
was
 
now
 
stationed,
 
lay
 
Statia,
 
home
 
to
 
Fran
çoise
 
Vaz
 
whose
 
life
 
he
 
was
 
about
 
to
 
change.
 
How,
 
we
 
will
 
find
 
out
 
in
 
the
 
next
 
installment
 
of 
 
Françoise
 
and 
 
her 
 
Roses
.”
 
French.
 
He
 
then
 
claimed
 
the
 
island
 
for
 
France.
 
The
 
Dutch
 
were
 
only
 
allowed
 
to
 
stay
 
if 
 
they
 
pledged
 
alle
giance
 
to
 
the
 
French
 
King.
 
There
 
was
 
very
 
little
 
en
thusiasm
 
to
 
do
 
this.
 
Love…
 
or
 
a
 
French
 
meal
 
ticket?
 
The
 
French
 
proceeded
 
to
 
ransack
 
the
 
island.
 
What
ever
 
was
 
redeveloped
 
during
 
the
 
previous
 
year,
 
was
 
taken
 
away:
 
the
 
processing
 
facilities
 
for
 
sugar
 
and
 
cotton,
 
the
 
slaves,
 
the
 
horses
 
and
 
the
 
oxen
 
for
 
the
 
sugar
 
mills.
 
Le
 
Febvre
 
de
 
la
 
Barre
 
sent
 
a
 
certain
 
Major
 
Gabriel
 
Folio,
 
Sieur
 
des
 
Roses
 
to
 
the
 
island
 
as
 
com
mander.
 
Statia
 
was
 
left
 
with
 
nothing,
 
everything
 
of 
 
value
 
had
 
been
 
carried
 
away.
 
But
 
for
 
Françoise,
 
now
 
a
 
young
 
lady
 
in
 
her
 
early
 
twenties,
 
there
 
was
 
the
 
French
 
‘Major
 
Rose.’
 
He
 
was
 
to
 
change
 
her
 
life.
 
Was
 
it
 
love?
 
Was
 
it
 
his
 
“right
 
of 
 
conquest”
 
as
 
the
 
new
 
master?
 
Or
 
was
 
it
 
her
 
survival
 
instinct
 
that
 
drove
 
her
 
into
 
the
 
arms
 
of 
 
the
 
new
 
man
 
in
 
power?
 
It
 
is
 
not
 
an
 
easy
 
thing
 
to
 
find
 
out
 
after
 
more
 
than
 
three
 
centuries.
 
However,
 
it
 
is
 
not
 
too
 
difficult
 
to
 
imagine
 
that
 
with
 
things
 
being
 
as
 
they
 
were,
 
Françoise
 
may
 
have
 
thought
 
that
 
this
 
Frenchman
 
came
 
in
 
handy
 
and
 
could
 
be
 
her
 
ticket
 
to
 
a
 
more
 
comfortable
 
life.
 
Physical
 
While
 
Françoise
 
was
 
busy
 
in
 
Statia
 
tightening
 
the
 
bond
 
with
 
her
 
Sieur
 
des
 
Roses,
 
Dutch
 
diplomats
 
in
 
Europe
 
occupied
 
themselves
 
with
 
getting
 
Statia
 
back
 
 –
 
after
 
all:
 
it
 
was
 
their
 
troops
 
that
 
conquered
 
the
 
island
 
before
 
the
 
French
 
cheated
 
them
 
out
 
of 
 
final
 
victory.
 
The
 
English
 
were
 
obstructing
 
the
 
return
 
of 
 
Statia
 
to
 
the
 
Netherlands
 
 –
 
until
 
the
 
Dutch
 
showed
 
them
 
who
 
was
 
boss
 
on
 
the
 
seas
 
by
 
sailing
 
up
 
the
 
Thames
 
and
 
burning
 
the
 
core
 
of 
 
the
 
English
 
fleet.
 
The
 
glow
 
of 
 
the
 
flames
 
was
 
visible
 
in
 
London,
 
sending
 
off 
 
a
 
clear
 
message.
 
One
 
of 
 
the
 
results
 
was
 
that
 
at
 
the
 
Peace
 
of 
 
Breda
 
that
 
followed
 
in
 
1667,
 
Statia
 
was
 
returned
 
to
 
the
 
Dutch.
 
However,
 
it
 
took
 
until
 
the
 
next
 
year
 
for
 
the
 
Dutch
 
to
 
physically
 
take
 
possession
 
again
 
 –
 
long
 
enough
 
for
 
Françoise
 
to
 
get
 
physical
 
in
 
a
 
different
 
way
 
and
 
strengthen
 
her
 
ties
 
with
 
Des
 
Roses.
 
“Where
 
no
 
one
 
else
 
would
 
want
 
to
 
stay”
 
August 17, 2009
F
RANCOISE
 
AND
 
HER
R
OSES
 
Gabriel
 
Folio,
 
Sieur
 
des
 
Roses
 
was
 
placed
 
in
 
command
 
of 
 
Marie
 
Galante
 
in
 
1664
 
(Walter
 
hellebrand
 
Collection)
 
In
 
1666,
 
Des
 
Roses,
 
then
 
com
mander
 
of 
 
St.
 
Martin,
 
attacked
 
Anguilla
 
(Walter
 
Hellebrand
 
Collection)
 

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