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Trent Waste Audit Report - Tim Shah

Trent Waste Audit Report - Tim Shah

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Re-thinking Waste Management Alternatives at Trent University: A Special Report on Composting: Challenges, Successes and Future Directions A Report by Daniel Arthur & Timothy Shah
March 2009

1

Table of Contents _______________________________________________________________________ _ Page Number 1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.2 2.0 About the Survey Background on Waste Diversion 3 6 6 8 10 14 17 19 19 23 28 31

Why Compost on Campus? 2.1 Resource Recovery Station Information Sheet 2.2 Compost Weights
Re-thinking Waste Management Alternatives at Trent University: A Special Report on Composting: Challenges, Successes and Future Directions A Report by Daniel Arthur & Timothy Shah
March 2009

1

Table of Contents _______________________________________________________________________ _ Page Number 1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.2 2.0 About the Survey Background on Waste Diversion 3 6 6 8 10 14 17 19 19 23 28 31

Why Compost on Campus? 2.1 Resource Recovery Station Information Sheet 2.2 Compost Weights

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11/25/2013

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Re-thinking WasteManagement Alternatives atTrent University: A SpecialReport on Composting:Challenges, Successes andFuture DirectionsA Report by Daniel Arthur &Timothy Shah
March 2009
1
 
Table of Contents _______________________________________________________________________  _ 
Page Number 1.0Introduction31.1About the Survey61.2Background on Waste Diversion62.0Why Compost on Campus?82.1
 
Resource Recovery Station Information Sheet102.2 Compost Weights at Trent142.3 The Costs of Disposal173.0 Recommendations193.1Understanding the Big Picture: Looking at Finances193.2Education and Compost Training233.3A Student, Faculty and Community Oriented Compost Program284.0Summary and Concluding Comments31References34Appendix 1Survey Results36Appendix 2The Geographic Location of Trents Organic Waste Pile41Appendix 3 City of Peterborough Waste Management42Appendix 4 A Survey on Composting at Trent University’s Symons Campus432
 
1.0 Introduction
Over the past 30 years, composting has become an integral component of thewaste management system. Since the 1970s, citizens across North America voluntarilystarted bringing compost bins in their backyards. With the advent of garbage crises in North America, along with increased awareness and concern over landfill dependence,new alternatives have come to the forefront including the introduction of a variety of composting programs. Over the past 10 years, both small and big metropolises inSouthern Ontario have implemented green bin compost programs to deal with reduction.In Toronto, households can now put organics (fruit and vegetables scraps, paper towels,coffee grinds, etc.) out for separate collection along with the regular garbage andrecycling matter.Composting is a well researched and well understood process. While the scienceis well established, the operational component of composting still needs work. Scientistsand engineers define composting as “an aerobic biological process, conducted under controlled, engineered conditions designed to decompose and stabilize the organicfraction of solid waste” (Ontario Ministry of the Environment, 2004). While thisdefinition appears to be thorough and clear, it remains esoteric and too scientifically based. The general populace may understand composting as organic waste resulting fromfood or plant sources that are decomposed by worms and/or other organisms. As thisresearch will reveal, communication and education are fundamental components of ensuring a sound waste management system. Defining the term and clearly explainingwhat it is, is essential for achieving a higher waste diversion rate.Trent University composted 15,000 kilograms in the 2006-2007 academic year (Trent Physical Resources, 2009). In the following academic year, the composting ratewent up to 56,000 kilograms; an increase of 273%. This portends that the campus has insome way increased awareness and ameliorated the waste diversion process. This reportwill note that the most optimal way to increase awareness and familiarity with programslike composting or recycling is through education. The composting program on campus iswell established as designated bins are found across academic buildings, residences and3

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