Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
11Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
No. 33 - Strategic Energy Policy: Challenges for the 21ST Century

No. 33 - Strategic Energy Policy: Challenges for the 21ST Century

Ratings: (0)|Views: 76 |Likes:
Published by bowssen

More info:

Published by: bowssen on Apr 19, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/10/2014

pdf

text

original

 
CHALLENGES FOR THE 21
ST
CENTURY 
TASK FORCE REPORT
EPORTOFAN
I
NDEPENDENT
T
 ASK 
F
ORCE
C
OSPONSOREDBYTHE
J
 AMES
 A. B
 AKER 
III I
NSTITUTEFOR 
P
UBLIC
P
OLICYOF
ICE
U
NIVERSITYANDTHE
C
OUNCILON
F
OREIGN
ELATIONS
E
DWARD
L. M
ORSE
, C
HAIR 
 A 
MY 
M
 YERS
J
 AFFE
, P
ROJECT
D
IRECTOR 
STRATEGIC ENERGYPOLICY
 
Strategic Energy Policy 
Challenges for the
21
ST
Century 
Report of an Independent Task Force Cosponsored by the  James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy of Rice University and the Council on Foreign Relations 
Edward L.Morse,ChairAmy Myers Jaffe,Project Director
 
 The mission of the
Baker Institute 
is to help bridge the gap between the theory and prac-tice of public policy by drawing together experts from academia,government,the media,business,and nongovernmental organizations.By involving both policymakers and schol-ars,the Institute seeks to improve the debate on selected public policy issues and to makea difference in the formulation,implementation,and evaluation of public policy,both domes-tic and international.The Baker Institute is an integral part of Rice University,one of thenations most distinguished institutions of higher learning,located in Houston,Texas.Rice’sfaculty and students play an important role in its research programs and public events. The research and views expressed in this paper are those of the Independent Task Force,and do not necessarily represent the views of the James A.Baker III Institute for PublicPolicy.Founded in 1921,the
Council on Foreign Relations 
is a nonpartisan membership organi-zation,research center,and publisher.It is dedicated to increasing America’s understand-ing of the world and contributing ideas to U.S.foreign policy.The Council accomplishesthis mainly by promoting constructive discussions both in private and in public,and by pub-lishing
Foreign Affairs 
,the leading journal on global issues.The Council is host to the widestpossible range of views,but an advocate of none,though its research fellows and Independent Task Forces do take policy stands. THE COUNCIL TAKES NO INSTITUTIONAL POSITION ON POLICY ISSUESAND HAS NO AFFILIATION WITH THE U.S.GOVERNMENT.ALL STATE-MENTS OF FACT AND EXPRESSIONS OF OPINION CONTAINED IN ALL ITSPUBLICATIONS ARE THE SOLE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE AUTHOR OR AUTHORS. The Council will sponsor an Independent Task Force when (1) an issue of current andcritical importance to U.S.foreign policy arises,and (2) it seems that a group diverse inbackgrounds and perspectives may,nonetheless,be able to reach a meaningful consensuson a policy through private and nonpartisan deliberations.Typically,a Task Force meetsbetween two and five times over a brief period to ensure the relevance of its work.Upon reaching a conclusion,a Task Force issues a report,and the Council publishes its textand posts it on the Council website (www.cfr.org).Task Force Reports can take three forms:(1) a strong and meaningful policy consensus,with Task Force members endorsing the gen-eral policy thrust and judgments reached by the group,though not necessarily every find-ing and recommendation;(2) a report stating the various policy positions,each as sharply and fairly as possible;or (3) a “Chairmans Report,”where Task Force members who agree with the Chairmans Report may associate themselves with it,while those who disagree may submit dissenting statements.Upon reaching a conclusion,a Task Force may also ask indi- viduals who were not members of the Task Force to associate themselves with the Task ForceReport to enhance its impact.All Task Force Reports “benchmarktheir findings againstcurrent administration policy in order to make explicit areas of agreement and disagree-ment.The Task Force is solely responsible for its report.The Council takes no institutionalposition.For further information about the Council or this Task Force,please write the Councilon Foreign Relations,58 East 68th Street,New York,NY 10021,or call the Director of Communications at (212) 434-9400.Visit our website at www.cfr.org.Copyright ©2001 by the Council on Foreign Relations,Inc.All rights reserved.Printedin the United States of America.
This report may be quoted or reproduced, provided appropriate credit is given to the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Activity (11)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
banarisali liked this
erichendra liked this
lenasg liked this
faruna2003 liked this
Oxony20 liked this
Oxony20 liked this
banben liked this
suremash liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->