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Ed. Magazine, Fall 2009

Ed. Magazine, Fall 2009

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The alumni magazine of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Fall 2009 edition. Features include Arne Duncan's work as the newly appointed secretary of education, instructional rounds in education, and a look at Ed School alums who have started their own schools.
The alumni magazine of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Fall 2009 edition. Features include Arne Duncan's work as the newly appointed secretary of education, instructional rounds in education, and a look at Ed School alums who have started their own schools.

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Published by: Harvard Graduate School of Education on May 03, 2010
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the magazine of the harvard graduate School of educationfall 2009 | vol. liii, no. 1
Medical ModelSar Your Own School
 Also
A
rne
D
uncAn
The M Tryig t Chgethe Sttus Qu d Put theDeprtmet f EductiBck  the Mp
 
1
Ed.
 
Harvard GraduatE ScHool of Education
fall 2009
PullinG Back tHE covEr
Arne’s siblings also work in education: His sister Sarah, also aormer Harvard hoops player, runs the Community Schoolsprogram at the University o Chicago, and his brother Owenis assistant director o their mother’s aterschool center.During his our years playing or the Australian NationalBasketball League, Duncan’s nickname was “the cobra.”In 2004, Duncan pushed through a policy that requiredwould-be dropouts to sign a orm that warns o the risks.Phrases on the orm included: “I will be less likely to ndgood jobs that pay well, bad jobs that don’t pay well, ormaybe any jobs” and “I will be more likely to spend time in jail or prison.”While overseeing schools in Chicago, he was credited withtrying to open the nation’s rst gay-riendly high school.(Te plan is currently on hold.)Growing up, the Duncan household didn’t have a television set.In 2004, Duncan threatened to sue the U.S. Departmento Education ater the agency pulled No Child Let Behindunding or a district-run tutoring program or 40,000struggling Chicago students.Tis past summer, Duncan recruited White House pals tohelp read books once a week to local children (includinghis own: Clare, 7, and Ryan, 4) as part o the Read to theop series. Duncan kicked o the program with
Cliord the Big Red Dog 
and
Where the Wild Tings Are
. Other readersincluded David Axelrod (White House senior advisor) whoread
 First Dog 
and Marian Robinson (rst grandmother)who read
Te Napping House
.Duncan once tried out or the Boston Celtics.As secretary o education, he’s 16th in line or thepresidency.He’s tall — 6 oot 5.
Dnn Dt
    A    P    P    h    o    t    o    /    M    A    n    u    e    l    B    A    l    c    e    c    e    n    e    t    A
Ater reading our cover story, you may think you know Arne Duncan, secretary o education and ormer Ed School visitingcommittee member, airly well. But here are 10 things about him that just may surprise you.
Arne Duncan listens as Marian Robinson, mother o rstlady Michelle Obama, reads books to children during a“Read to The Top!”summer reading program
llllllllll
Ed.
The Magazine of The harvard graduaTe School of educaTion | fall 2009 | vol. liii, no. 1
fardparm
3 Da’ Prpiv4 lr6 t Appia Wa34 I  Mdia40 Ivig42 Ami nw ad n48 RWi obama’ ci cag edai i Amria?
Ater several years as a member o the Ed School’s visiting committee,Chicagoan Arne Duncan is now heading up President Barack Obama’sDepartment o Education with a team o Ed School alumni — andinormal aculty advisors — in tow.Some get excited about a new idea. Others get rustrated withwhat they’ve experienced. All ace hurdles. A look at Ed Schoolalumni who have started their own schools — barriers, roadblocks,chutzpah, and all.What is good teaching and learning? Without a common languageor shared practices, educators are oten all over the map whenit comes to answering this question. Inspired by a practice usedby physicians called medical rounds, the authors o a recentlypublished book,
 Instructional Rounds in Education
, look at a newmodel that could help educators nd common ground.
cri 101Rd ad Rd
    C   o   v   e   r   :    A   r   n   e    D   u   n   c   a   n   w    i   t    h   c    h    i    l    d   r   e   n    f   r   o   m     N   e   w    b   e   r   r   y    A   c   a    d   e   m   y    i   n    C    h    i   c   a   g   o .
    J    o    h    n    K    n    o    x    /    F    R    I    e    n    D    s    o    F    n    e    W    B    e    R    R    y    A    c    A    D    e    M    y
 
Ed.
 
Harvard GraduatE ScHool of Education
fall 2009
2 3
Ed.
 
Harvard GraduatE ScHool of Education
fall 2009
Dear Friends:I last had the distinct honor to meet with Arne Duncan in January, shortly aterPresident Barack Obama tapped him to be the ninth secretary o education o the United States. During our conversation, I was struck by Duncan’s steadastcommitment to improving the lives o learners, especially those in strugglingdistricts. During our conversation, I was reminded o President Obama’s wordswhen he announced Duncan’s nomination: “When it comes to school reorm,Arne is the most hands-on o hands-on practitioners. For Arne, school reormisn’t just a theory in a book — it’s the cause o his lie.”Bridging the gap between what we know and what we do is at the heart o eecting positive change in education. During his tenure with Chicago PublicSchools, Duncan made dicult choices that were based on evidence anddriven by data. He closed schools, invested in early childhood education,and set high expectations or students and teachers alike. As John McQuaiddescribes in the cover story o this issue o 
 Ed.
, Duncan launched a com-prehensive intervention program aimed at struggling rst-year high schoolstudents. Te program reected ndings by the University o Chicago’sConsortium on Public School Research. Duncan’s policies resulted in ewerdropouts, more students going to college, and a stronger sense o communityin Chicago’s most troubled districts.Duncan has made many riends over the course o his career, including several Ed School aculty members. In 2004, Duncanbrought his senior leadership team rom Chicago to participate in our Public Education Leadership Project, an executiveleadership program jointly sponsored by the Ed School and the Harvard Business School. He recently served as a member o our visiting committee. And in his new role as secretary, Duncan has reached out to Associate Proessor Monica Higgins andProessor om Payzant, as well as Academic Dean Bob Schwartz, or counsel as he begins this role at an important time in ourcountry’s history.Duncan’s tenure with the Chicago Public Schools could be viewed as a case study in leadership and management throughcollaboration. As you will read, he initiated bold and potentially controversial programs, while maintaining strong politicalbacking. His personable style won him supporters where there were previously antagonists, and his relentless ocus on studentlearning brought new enthusiasm or education reorm, even in communities that had been intensely polarized. Given histrack record o implementing evidence-based research to improve student learning, I am condent he will provide much-needed ederal leadership to guide the next generation o education reorm.Sincerely,Kathleen McCartneySeptember 2009
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HGSE Alumni Council, 2009—2010HGSE Visiting Committee, 2009—2010HGSE Dean’s Council, 2009—2010
    J    o    n    e    s    F    o    t    o
It’ n Hnr
 American Illustration
selected an illustrationcreated by
Blair Kelly 
 or the story, “In theMiddle,” which ran inthe winter 2009 issue o 
 Ed.,
as one o the besto the year.

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