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Security and Africa's First World Cup

Security and Africa's First World Cup

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Published by Gaetano Zappulla
Security is always a concern for organizers of the World Cup, and this year’s upcoming tournament in South Africa — the first World Cup on the continent — is no exception. Envisioning a range of threats from terrorism to petty crime, tournament organizers are trying to beef up security in nine cities that will serve as venues for the games. Less than a month before the tournament begins, STRATFOR thought it time to look at how real those threats are and how security preparations are shaping up.



Read more: Security and Africa's First World Cup | STRATFOR
Security is always a concern for organizers of the World Cup, and this year’s upcoming tournament in South Africa — the first World Cup on the continent — is no exception. Envisioning a range of threats from terrorism to petty crime, tournament organizers are trying to beef up security in nine cities that will serve as venues for the games. Less than a month before the tournament begins, STRATFOR thought it time to look at how real those threats are and how security preparations are shaping up.



Read more: Security and Africa's First World Cup | STRATFOR

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Published by: Gaetano Zappulla on Jul 18, 2010
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05/17/2012

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STRATFOR 700 Lavaca Street, Suite 900 Austin, TX 78701 Tel: 1-512-744-4300www.stratfor.com 
 
SPECIAL REPORT:Security and Africa’s First World Cup
May 18, 2010
This analysis may not be forwarded or republished without express permission from STRATFOR.For permission, please submit a request toPR@stratfor.com. 
 
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©
 
2010 STRATFOR 700 Lavaca Street, Suite 900 Austin, TX 78701 Tel: 1-512-744-4300www.stratfor.com 
Security and Africa’sFirst World Cup
Security is always a concern for organizersof the World Cup, and this year’s upcomingtournament in South Africa — the firstWorld Cup on the continent — is noexception. Envisioning a range of threatsfrom terrorism to petty crime, tournamentorganizers are trying to beef up security innine cities that will serve as venues for thegames. Less than a month before the tournament begins, STRATFOR thought it time to look at howreal those threats are and how security preparations are shaping up.In June and July, South Africa will host the first World Cup tournament ever held in Africa. The firstgame of the tournament will be June 11 in Johannesburg, where the finals are scheduled to be heldJuly 11. The World Cup draws hordes of spectators, sponsors and dignitaries, including this year,perhaps, U.S. President Barack Obama, who has expressed an interest in attending should the U.S.team proceed to the finals.Security is always a concern for World Cup organizers, and this year’s tournament — the largestsporting event ever hosted on African soil — raises concerns about South Africa’s ability to provide asecure environment for the month-long event. While terrorism is high on the list of organizers’ concerns, the security issue that will affect the most people will likely be violent crime, which hasgrown endemic in South Africa over the past two decades.The South Africa World Cup Organizing Committee has designated nine cities to host the soccermatches: Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg, Bloemfontein (Mangaung in the local language), Pretoria(Tshwane), Rustenburg, Port Elizabeth, Polokwane and Nelspruit. Semi-final matches will be played inCape Town and Durban, the third place match will be played in Port Elizabeth and the finals will beplayed in Johannesburg.In the run-up to the event, STRATFOR thought it appropriate to take a look at the securityenvironment in South Africa, evaluate specific threats and offer guidance on how to avoid dangerduring the tournament.
Crime
Unlike terrorism, which tends to be driven by ideology, criminal activity is driven by opportunity andthe desire for quick cash,and both of those factors will be in abundance during the World Cup. Tomitigate against any conceivable security threat, an estimated 44,000 members of the South AfricanPolice Service (SAPS), the South African National Defense Force (SANDF) and private securitypersonnel will be deployed at tournament venues, hotels where the teams will be staying andanywhere considered a possible launching point for criminal or terrorist acts (more on thesedeployments below in the section titled “Security Preparations”). Many national teams will also havetheir own security details. The U.S. team, for example, will be guarded by personnel from the StateDepartment’s Diplomatic Security Service (DSS).
 
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©
 
2010 STRATFOR 700 Lavaca Street, Suite 900 Austin, TX 78701 Tel: 1-512-744-4300www.stratfor.com 
Foreign governments also have been heavily involved in assisting South African security officials withlogistics and communications in preparation for the tournament and will remain involved until it ends.The DSS has extensive experience conducting security for large, high-profile events, and there hasbeen extensive coordination with the German authorities to learn from their experiences hosting thelast World Cup, which was held in 2006. These measures will certainly go a long way toward securingthe stadiums, hotels and other World Cup venues, most of which are located in city centers. But effortsto secure World Cup activities could displace criminal attacks to more accessible targets outside thisring of security, to urban and rural areas where the police presence will be weaker.Property crime is widespread in South Africa and found in every city throughout the country. Thecountry’s criminal elements tend to be organized and efficient, with gangs often conducting practiceruns and extensive preoperational surveillance before hitting hardened targets such as armored cashtransporters and ATMs (sometimes using explosives and automatic weapons). Organized-crime leadersare even known to specify high-demand products for theft, including certain models of cars and cell

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