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Reece Committee Hearings - Tax-Exempt Foundations (1953) - Part 2 of 4

Reece Committee Hearings - Tax-Exempt Foundations (1953) - Part 2 of 4

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Published by rnbaker7
These are the transcripts (Part 2 of 4) of the United States House of Representatives Reece Committee hearings in 1953 into the "un-American" activities of tax-exempt foundations. This document is 2086 pages (pp. 587-1086 are here) and outlines the major foundations push to "change" US education and their many other "endeavors". If you think that they were not trying (or capable) to "change" American education, government, etc. in a way that most people would find disgusting, one should look into Charlotte Iserbyt and John Taylor Gatto and their works for more documentation and information. Or, look into the Cox Committee (links below). Or, look into the foundations other proven "endeavors" in eugenics and the overpopulation movement (most notably "War Against the Weak" by Edwin Black). We can thank Charlotte Iserbyt and her associates for this important historical document. Please watch the following powerful (or powerfully sickening) interview with Norman Dodd for more information (he was the Research Director for the Reece Committee, which was continuing investigation into tax-exempt foundations' activities)...
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7373201783240489827

and read "Foundations: Their Power and Influence" by Rene A. Wormser (Paperback - Jun 1993) (Wormser was the General Counsel for the Reece Committee)

and read Daniel Taylor's research paper on the Reece Committee...
http://www.oldthinkernews.com/Articles/oldthinker%20news/reece_committee.htm

and read the rest of the transcripts of the Reece Committee Hearings on Tax-Exempt Foundations...
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3683662/Reece-Committee-Hearings-TaxExempt-Foundations-1953-Part-1-of-4
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3684101/Reece-Committee-Hearings-TaxExempt-Foundations-1953-Part-3-of-4
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3684225/Reece-Committee-Hearings-TaxExempt-Foundations-1953-Part-4-of-4

and read Norman Dodd's report to the Reece Committee...
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3768227/Dodd-Report-to-the-Reece-Committee-on-Foundations-1954

and read the transcripts of the Cox Committee Hearings on Tax-Exempt Foundations...
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3767291/Cox-Committee-Hearings-on-the-Investigation-of-TaxExempt-Foundations-1952-Transcripts

and read "War Against the Weak" by Edwin Black...
http://www.amazon.com/War-Against-Weak-Eugenics-Americas/dp/1568583214/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214955100&sr=8-1
These are the transcripts (Part 2 of 4) of the United States House of Representatives Reece Committee hearings in 1953 into the "un-American" activities of tax-exempt foundations. This document is 2086 pages (pp. 587-1086 are here) and outlines the major foundations push to "change" US education and their many other "endeavors". If you think that they were not trying (or capable) to "change" American education, government, etc. in a way that most people would find disgusting, one should look into Charlotte Iserbyt and John Taylor Gatto and their works for more documentation and information. Or, look into the Cox Committee (links below). Or, look into the foundations other proven "endeavors" in eugenics and the overpopulation movement (most notably "War Against the Weak" by Edwin Black). We can thank Charlotte Iserbyt and her associates for this important historical document. Please watch the following powerful (or powerfully sickening) interview with Norman Dodd for more information (he was the Research Director for the Reece Committee, which was continuing investigation into tax-exempt foundations' activities)...
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7373201783240489827

and read "Foundations: Their Power and Influence" by Rene A. Wormser (Paperback - Jun 1993) (Wormser was the General Counsel for the Reece Committee)

and read Daniel Taylor's research paper on the Reece Committee...
http://www.oldthinkernews.com/Articles/oldthinker%20news/reece_committee.htm

and read the rest of the transcripts of the Reece Committee Hearings on Tax-Exempt Foundations...
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3683662/Reece-Committee-Hearings-TaxExempt-Foundations-1953-Part-1-of-4
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3684101/Reece-Committee-Hearings-TaxExempt-Foundations-1953-Part-3-of-4
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3684225/Reece-Committee-Hearings-TaxExempt-Foundations-1953-Part-4-of-4

and read Norman Dodd's report to the Reece Committee...
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3768227/Dodd-Report-to-the-Reece-Committee-on-Foundations-1954

and read the transcripts of the Cox Committee Hearings on Tax-Exempt Foundations...
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3767291/Cox-Committee-Hearings-on-the-Investigation-of-TaxExempt-Foundations-1952-Transcripts

and read "War Against the Weak" by Edwin Black...
http://www.amazon.com/War-Against-Weak-Eugenics-Americas/dp/1568583214/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214955100&sr=8-1

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Published by: rnbaker7 on Jun 28, 2008
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TAX-EXEMPT FOUNDATIONS'
e
5
83
"
pulled into a university. Personally, I regret to see the small
colleges raided in this way by the great universities taking off the
faculties of these small colleges-teachers who are doing so muchgood for the American people
.
The CHAIRMAN
. But there would be less likelihood of the so-called
raiding both of the faculty and the graduate students in the small
colleges if grants were more general and made available to the out-
standing faculty members and the outstanding students, don't youthink?
Dr
. Cou GROVE
. Oh, yes, quite true
. Quite true
. We have had a
number of universities that have raided small colleges almost to theirdestruction
. President Harper of the University of Chicago raided
Clark University, took pretty largely all of its talent to the Uni-
versity of Chicago. But that was before the foundations were greatlyoperative; and of course he did it by offering, on the one hand, re-
search facilities, and on the other hand, much higher salaries than
they were getting at Clark University
.
Mr
. HAYS
. There is just the point of the whole thing
. You your-
self say that is before the foundations got into the picture
. It hap-pened. And it is the same thing that is happening to the one-room
school, the little red schoolhouse
. Everybody likes to get nostalgic
about it in talking about it, but they are slowly disappearing, and I
do not think that the foundations have anything to do with that,
do they?
Dr
. CoLEGRovE
. No, it is the better transportation system and thebetter facilities offered to the pupils at the township schools
.
Mr
. HAYS
. It has only been in the last 1.0 years that you dared to
run for office if you had not been born in a log cabin and had not
gone to the little red schoolhouse
.
The CHAIRMAN
. I have met both requirements
.
Mr
. WoRMSER
. Professor, I would like your comments on this sub-
ject, if you will
. The trustees of these foundations have a distinct
fiduciary responsibility which they recognize, in principle, at least,as the trustees of public funds
. It seems to me the most important
trust function they have is to exercise judgment in connection with
the selection of grants and grantees. Does it not seem to you that toa very large extent they have abandoned that trust function, that trustduty, and have delegated the whole thing to other organizations? Thatin certain areas they have used these intermediate organizations to ful-fill their judgment function for them, which they, as trustees, should
exercise? Would you comment on that?
Dr
. COLEGROVE
. I think that has very largely occurred
. I do not
quite like to put it this way, but the trustees are in many cases justwindow dressing to give popular confidence in the institution
. In the
United States we think an institution needs a very distinguished boardof trustees; and, of course, you know, from college experience, a great
many men are made trustees of a university because the university
expects them to make a large donation to the endowment fund or build
a building or something like that. And to offset a group of rich
trustees, you put on some trustees who have large reputations in theliterary world or in other fields than merely finance
.
Many of the trustees, I am afraid, have gotten into a very bad habit
.
They are perfectly realistic
. They know why they are put on the
 
584
TAX-hXt"IPT FOUNDATIONS
board of trustees
.
And they are not as careful as they should be intaking responsibility for the operation of those organizations
.
I think the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, whichwas set up under Elihu Root and President Nicholas Murray Butler
way back, I think, about 1908, had a board of trustees picked by Presi-dent Butler, and I think Butler expected to get a great deal of advicefrom those trustees
.
But I do recall many years later President Butler told me that hehad to use very extraordinary methods to get his trustees to meet evenfor the annual meeting
.
Mr
.
WORMSER
.
Then, in practice, they delegate their authority partlyto other organizations
.
Of course, where they do make their own
grants directly, they delegate enormously to their professional em-ployees, the executives, who do not have the same trust responsibilitybut are merely executives
.
Dr
.
CoLEGROVE
.
Yes, they delegate their authority in several direc-tions. Trustees delegate their authority to the president of the foun-dation. The president in large measure even delegates his authorityto the heads of departments. A president of one of these large fundssometimes is a little hazy about what is happening in this division orin that division
.
And in these heads of departments-let's say of the
Rockefeller Foundation, where you have the socialsciences and
humanities-you
will
find a delegation of authority in the case of thesocial sciences to the operating society, the Social Science Research
Council, and to the American Council of Learned Societies in the
case of the humanities. So you have a delegation of authority in twodirections there
.
Mr
WoRnMSER
.
So whether a foundation fulfills its obligation tothe public rests primarily on the selection of its employees and theassociation with these intermediate groups
.
Is it your opinion, Pro-fessor, that these employees-I don't mean in a derogatory sense tosay "employees", the officers of these organizations-are on the samecaliber as a whole, do they compare well with university executives orthose who would administer -rants under university administration?
Dr
.
CoLEGRovE
.
Well, I think those of us in political science feel that
Joe Willits, who was a professor of the University of Pennsylvaniabefore he took the position that he has at the present time, is an out-standing scholar, a most competent administrator, a very good judge
of human nature
.
And yet he cannot give all of his attention to theexpenditure of these' vast sums
.
What applies, of course, to the Rockefeller Foundation applies
even more forcibly to the Ford Foundation, which is much larger
.
Mr
WORMSER
.
One witness, Professor Briggs, testified that in hisopinion there wasn't one single employee in the Ford Fund for the
Advancement of Education, from the top down to the bottom, who
had had enough experience in the areas in which they were operating
to make proper judgments
. That does not sound very good for foun-dation practices, if they select men as carelessly, let us say, as that
.
I
am trying to make a comparison with universities, because I
am
interested particularly in the possibility that a better medium forfoundation largesse may be through the universities, instead of throughprofessional agencies
.
Dr
.
COLEGROVE
.
Oh, quite true. I think it would require a largernumber of topnotch administrators in the foundations to exercise more
 
TAX-EXEMPT FOUNDATIONS
585
critical judgment than can be exercised at the present time
.
Even
there, however, you would have to choose between universities
; and if
you are going to the small colleges, there is a case where you wouldhave to have many careful surveys and studies, and an acquaintancewith the personnel and faculties of those universities
.
Probably the,staffs of high-grade men, let us say men serving under Dr
. Willits,
ought to be a little higher caliber
.
Mr
HAYS
.
Professor, right there, no matter how a foundation
handed this money out, you would find somebody to say they did notgive it to the right people
.
Dr
.
COLEGROVE
.
Oh, yes
.
Mr
.
HAYS
.
And if they gave it all to the small colleges, you could
undoubtedly set up a committee who would say that was a terrible
thing and they wasted money and were not getting results, and so on
.
So all of this testimony is a matter of opinion, is it not?I mean, asto this particular phase
. Dr
. Briggs says and you say that it shouldnot be done through these societies; that it should be done the other
way
.
COLEGROVE
.
It is opinion based on our observations
.
Mr
.
HAYS
.
Yes
.
Dr
.
COLEGROVE
.
My observations would be in a little different fieldthan Professor Briggs' observations would be
.
I would
say,
trying
o
be cautious in what I do say, that based on my observation I thinkthe foundations hate not given as careful a study to some of thesephases as I would like to see
.
Mr
.
HAYS
.
Well, now, you talked a little bit ago about the delega-tion of authority. Do you have any specific ideas about what we coulddo to remedy that, if that is bad?
I mean how are you going to get
away from it?
Dr
.
COLEGROVE
.
Well, you cannot avoid delegation of authority, but agood_ administrator has to know how to delegate
.
He has to choose
to whom he is going to delegate, and choose what powers he is going` todelegate, and then finally he has to have his system of reviewing the
achievements of persons to whom power to make' decisions has been
delegated
.
Mr
WORMSER
.
May I interrupt to help Mr
. Hays' question?
Mr
.
HAYS
.
You are sure this is going to be helpful
?
Mr
.
WORMSER
.
Yes, Sir
.
Mr
. Hays has said that it seemed to him a trustee should not act asa trustee of a foundation unless he was willing to give the time to itthat was necessary. It seemed to me that that was a very apt remark
.
And I wonder if that is not the answer, that these men are so busywith their own lives that although they are eminent they are not capa-ble of being trustees of foundations
.
That is no criticism of them aspersons
.
Dr
.
COLEGROVE
.
Yes
; undoubtedly many of the trustees would not
serve if they felt that they would be called upon to do much more
than go to the meetings, hear the reports, and sometimes not say asingle word. You would not have as brilliant, as lofty, as remarkable,a collection of men as trustees if you required a little more respon-sibility on their part. I would say, on the whole, the board of trusteesis too hirge
. There are too many remarkable
mnen,
in New York and
elsewhere, who are trustees of more than one foundation
.
And' justas we exercise in the American Political Science Association a "self-

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