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InPrincipio-2004-06

InPrincipio-2004-06

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Published by: the University of Notre Dame Australia on Feb 24, 2011
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07/06/2011

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INSIDE
this issue
T H E  U N I V E R S I T Y  O F  N O T R E  D A M E  A U S T R A L I A
VOLUME 15 N
0
2  ISSN 1448-076X JUNE 2004
Innovative medical school set to lead
Building set to meetheritage and technicalneeds
Work has started on there-cycling project of anold Henry St warehouseset to house NotreDame’s innovative Schoolof Medicine.See story page 3.
THE University of Notre Dame Australia’sSchool of Medicine Head Adrian Bowerleads a team setting up what he believeswill be the most innovative and radicalmedical school in the country. The missionof the School is to graduate doctors whowill work in areas of unmet need and thecourse is structured to do exactly that.The fact that the students will alreadyhave a degree, means that they will beable to take advantage of the innovativefeatures of the course.“ This is the third medical school I’ve beeninvolved in the accreditation of, the thirdcurriculum I’ve had an input in designing,and this is the most innovative and radical– and in many ways the most challenging,”Professor Bower said. I’m very excitedabout it. I think once the word gets outthere about our curriculum, people willactively choose Notre Dame over otherplaces.”The team – which includes College ofHealth Dean Michael Quinlan, foundationSchool of Medicine Head  Mark McKenna,Deputy Head Jenny McConnell and asteadily growing group of specialist staff– plans to open the School with 80Australian students at the start of next year.The school is undergoing Stage 2 of anexhaustive Australian Medical Councilaccreditation process, having been giventhe go-ahead to proceed late last year.The significance of that approval wasthe AMC believe that Notre Dame has acredible case for a medical school,”Professor Bower said.Not that the team is complacent – anAMC accreditation team is due to visitNotre Dame next month. Work is contin-uing unabated on the next areas to beassessed, including resources, facilities,staffing and course structure – all inconsiderable detail.Professor Bower said the assessment of amedical school was more stringent thanthat for any other tertiary course inAustralia.“ The difference is that we have to do allthis before a single student walksthrough the door – we are the onlyprofessional course that is subjected toaccreditation before we even start.”As to the reasons why Notre Dame’scourse will be different, Professor Bowersays the main reason is an emphasis oneducation in the community.During placements students will beroutinely exposed to medicine as it isreally practised, as opposed to the highly-filtered, highly-structured (although stillvery valuable) view as seen through thetertiary hospital system.
More page 4
s
Dean of Health’s report  . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
s
Annual Appeal Request  . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
s
Blessing of Hands  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
s
Sydney Campus bid  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
s
VC honoured in US . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
s
Pontifical affiliation  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
s
Student awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
s
Sport profile  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
v
The front of the proposed School of Medicine building in Henry Street.
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
 
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
 
DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH’S
report
2
This will be my last contribution to InPrincipio as Dean of the College of Health.I will be handing over to Professor MarkMcKenna with great confidence that he,along with the dedicated staff and studentsof the College, will lead it to bigger andbetter achievements in the years ahead.Since its inception in 1999, the growth ofthe College has been remarkable andgraduates from Counselling, Nursing andHealth and Physical Education have beenembraced by their respective professionsand reflected great credit on the Collegeand their teachers. In the University atlarge, deliberate and significant efforthas been placed on working with theprofessions and their communities inestablishing and delivering courses wherethe curricula are relevant and the graduates“ industry ready” . Graduates in Law, Edu-cation and Business have led the chargeably pursued by the Graduates of theCollege of Health. The same approach isbeing followed with the Schools ofPhysiotherapy and Medicine. This funda-mental strength must not be compromisedin the years to come when complacencyand hubris threaten to raise their uglyheads as the University grows.Exciting events continue within the College.The School of Nursing will be moving tonew quarters in the P&O building inPhillimore Street, in time for the 2005Academic year. This is a recognition of theburgeoning needs of the School and itsimportance to the University. Physiotherapyis expanding to occupy two adjacentbuildings in Henry Street – one a rehab-ilitation laboratory, and the other anelectrotherapy laboratory. Counselling andBehavioural Science have been activelyinvolved in the new St John of GodCounselling Centre in Henry Street.Martin Philpott has also been indiscussion with St John of God Healthcareregarding Genetic Counselling. In theSchool of Health and Physical Education,the large scale, Western Australian Childand Adolescent Physical Activity andNutrition survey is nearing completion forsubmission to the Premier’s PhysicalActivity Taskforce.The School of Medicine will be visited bythe Accreditation Committee of theAustralian Medical Council from the 12thto the 16th of July. The team of 10 willalso visit the Health Department and ourpartners at Curtin University, St John ofGod Murdoch, Fremantle Hospital, Rock-ingham Hospital, Hollywood PrivateHospital and CTEC. Refurbishment of theD&JFowler Building to house the Schoolis well underway and scheduled to becompleted in time to welcome the firstcohort of 80 students in February 2005.On May 5th, Dr Brendan Nelson MHR, theMinister for Education, Science andTechnology, announced a further 20 HECSplaces for the School, bringing the numberto 50. We are very grateful and excited bythis important announcement. I am verypleased to welcome Professor BernardPearn-Rowe to the staff of the School asMBBS Course Coordinator. A LiaisonCommittee between the Notre Dame andthe UWA Schools of Medicine has beenformally established and is chaired by DrAndrew Robinson from the WA HealthDepartment. It will look at issues such asclinical placements and we look forwardto effective collaboration between thetwo schools, given that our common goal
Dr Michael Quinlan /
Dean of Health
In  Pr i n c i p i o
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v
Dr Michael Quinlan
is to provide more doctors for the WesternAustralian people. We were pleased towelcome Matthew Hutchinson, Presidentof the Australian Medical Students Associ-ation, along with Simon Zilko and PhilipSingh from the Western Australian MedicalStudents’ Society to the College severalweeks ago. This was a productive meetingand I look forward to mutual support andcooperation between both groups andour future Medical students.With the establishment of the University,a deliberate decision to make the coresubjects of Philosophy, Theology andEthics mandatory for all courses was taken.This underpins the desire to educate allstudents in the true meaning of the word– to give intellectual, moral and socialinstruction. Words reflect or developideas and the word educe”  comes fromthe original Latin derivatives of ‘e’ meaning“ out”  and ‘du cere’ meaning “ to lead” .We want all our students to develop theirleadership talents to graduate, not justwith knowledge, but also with informedintellects, informed minds and informedconsciences – education in the true senseof that word. The potential to influencethe community at large is without bound-aries or limitations.I would like to thank all the wonderfulpeople in the College and the Universityfor their dedicated work and enthusiasmover the past 15 years in realising theVision of the University of Notre DameAustralia. I have been privileged to be a‘bit’ player along the way and acknowledgewith pride what you have all achieved.The University is in safe hands!
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIATHE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIATHE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
 
ARCHITECT Marcus Collin’s brief is todesign premises for a 21st century medicalschool within a 19th century warehouse.A veteran of such projects at Notre Dame,with many successful designs includingthose for the Colleges of Law, Science andTechnology and St Teresa’s Library underhis belt, Mr Collins is inspired rather thandaunted by the current work in progress.This is a sound building, largely intactand untouched since Victorian times,”  MrCollins said. “Buildings renovated sometimethis century are actually harder to workwith, because you often have to undounsympathetic work.All this building needed was strippingand cleaning before work could start.”Building approval was granted late lastmonth, and builders W. Fairweather andSon moved in.“ Heritage concerns are very high on ourlist,”  Mr Collins said. “ It’s very importantto protect and enhance the heritagevalue, and to this end we will keepeverything – not a single piece of originalfabric will be destroyed.The only changes will be a few additionalopenings, but these will be done in such away that at any time they could be
3
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
update
reconstructed from the conserved materialand the building would again be a Victorianwarehouse.”In fact, the building will be improved afterthe work.Since construction by merchants D and JFowler in 1898, the building – like manyin the West End built on what was oncesand dunes has been subjected to subsi-dence. There are large cracks in someinternal walls which will be secured withheavy-duty rods and bolts, ensuring thebuilding will be safe from furtherdeterioration.When finished the building will housegeneral and special-purpose lecture rooms,offices and a 180-seat tiered lecturetheatre.To comply with modern standards therewill be handicapped access, toilets, air-conditioning, a lift, contemporary lightinglevels, and wiring for information tech-nology – all melded into the heritagefabric so the new fittings don’t detractphysically or visually from the building’sintegrity.Mr Collins said as usual with West Endbuildings, use by the University was farmore sympathetic than other recyclingalternatives such as residential.If you turned a building like this intounits, the heritage value would bedevastated,”  he said.Mr Collins’ work, which he describes as re-cycling rather than restoring, To paraphraseGlen Murcutt We touch the buildingslightly.”
Medical school brief fulfils heritage values
v
School of Medicine head Adrian Bower (left) andarchitect Marcus Collins, discuss plans for the building.
When finished the buildingwill house general and special-purpose lecture rooms,offices and a 180-seat tiered lecture theatre.
v
Architect Marcus Collins and School of Medicine headAdrian Bower at the site.
v
St John of God Health Care Board members (above with the University  of Notre Dame Australia’s College of HealthDean Michael Quinlan) visited the Fremantle Campus in April, and toured the building.
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
 
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIATHE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA
THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTRE DAME
AUSTRALIA

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