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The College Hill Independent: April 21, 2011

The College Hill Independent: April 21, 2011

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Published by: The College Hill Independent on Apr 21, 2011
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THE COLLEGE HILL
INDEPENDENT
VOLUME XXII, ISSUE 10APRIL 21, 2011BROWN/RISD WEEKLY
GOP Candidates // 
3
Reality TV
// 9
Open Source Academia
 // 11
 THE INTERVIEW ISSUE
 
THE INDY IS:
MANAGING EDITORS Gillian Brassil, Erik Font, Emily Martin • NEWS Emily Go-golak, Ashton Strait, Emma Whitford • METRO Emma Berry, Malcolm Burnley,Alice Hines, Jonah Wolf • FEATURES Belle Cushing, Mimi Dwyer, Eve Blazo, KateWelsh • ARTS Ana Alvarez, Maud Doyle, Olivia Fagon, Alex Spoto • LITERARYKate Van Brocklin • SCIENCE Maggie Lange • SPORTS/FOOD David Adler, GregBerman • OCCULT Alexandra Corrigan, Natasha Pradhan• LIST Dayna Tortorici •STAFF WRITER Erica Schwiegershausen • CIPHRESS IN CHIEF Raphaela Lipin-sky • COVER/CREATIVE CONSULTANT Emily Martin • X Fraser Evans • ILLUS-TRATIONS Annika Finne, Becca Levinson • DESIGN Maija Ekey, Katherine Entis,Mary-Evelyn Farrior, Emily Fishman, Maddy Jennings, Eli Schmitt, Joanna ZhangPHOTOGRAPHY John Fisher, Annie Macdonald • SENIOR EDITORS KatieJennings, Tarah Knaresboro, Erin Schikowski, Eli Schmitt, Dayna Tortorici, AlexVerdolini • MVP Emily Martin
COVER ART Emily MartinContact theindy@gmail.com for advertising information. // theindy.org
e College Hill Independent receives support from Campus Progress/Centerfor American Progress. Campus Progress works to help young people — advo-cates, activists, journalists, artists — make their voices heard on issues thatmatter. Learn more at CampusProgress.org.
AS IF YOU CARE: THE ISSUE:
 News
WEEK IN REVIEW
p.2
by David Adler, Mimi Dwyer, and Erica Schwiegershausen
DO THE RIGHT THING
p.3
by Emily Gogolak, Emma Whitford, and Ashton Strait
Food
LIBERIA COMES TO AMERICA
p.8
by Grace Dunham
Metro
WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS
p.5
by Jonah Wolf 
FROM THE EDITORS:
BOB THE BARBER
p.7
by Malcolm Burnley
Arts
9/11: THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT
p.13
by Maud Doyle
Literary
EXCERPT FROM BOTTLENECK
p.15
by Kate Van BrocklinThe
 New York Times
reported today that iPhones are recording their locations in a hid-den file, amassing a log of points in space-time which, plotted out over a map, can showtheir users’ trajectories. — Fireflies make spiralled traces through the night: it’s just asymptom of our sluggish vision, but perhaps it also means that we leave ghosts of ourown presence behind. — A psychogeographer of Paris tells us of one student whosedaily life took him to only two or three locations, by the same route each time. If hismovement were that of a stylus on a map, it would have worn right through the paper:and then through the table under it and down onward, into nothingness. — Klee saysthat drawing is just taking a line for a walk: and in the Nazca Desert, that’s preciselywhat one pre-Incan culture did. They dug shallow trenches through the topsoil, form-ing geometric figures miles wide, or looping into massive pictographs: llamas, mon-keys, hummingbirds. New Agers and anthropologists debate their function: routesof pilgrimage, spaceship runways, astronomical markings à la Stonehenge, drawingsfor the benefit of gods. — Perhaps a long time from now ‘hidden files’ and other suchdigital terms will look like arcane philosophical categories, like scraps of Kant or Plato:made metaphysical by their antiquity, as time turns grape juice into wine. What wouldit mean to look at the present as if it were archaic already? Perhaps this is the opiate of theory: to dim the present’s vividness with folds of thick imaginary time.
—ASV
At its theatrical release in Sweden, Mel Brooks’s
The Producers
(1968) was given theSwedish title
 Producenterna
(The Producers), but it was not a success then. After it wasre-released under the title
 Det våras för Hitler 
(Springtime for Hitler), it scored withthe Swedish audience. Because of this, all of Mel Brooks’s films were given a title with
 Det våras för...
(Springtime for...) in Sweden, up until
 Life Stinks
(
 Det våras för slummen
,Springtime for The Slums). For example,
 Blazing Saddles
was retitled
 Det våras för sher-iffen
(Springtime for the Sheriff) and
Spaceballs
was retitled
 Det våras för rymden
(Spring-time for Space).
Opinions
A LOGICAL CHOICE
p.6
by Aaron Regunberg
Features
A TASTE FOR TRASH
p.9
by Eve Blazo
OPEN SOURCE ACADEMIA
p.11
by Annie Macdonald
Science
A NEW DISCOVERY ZONE
p.14
by Maggie Lange
EPHEMERA:
 
APRIL 21 2011 | THE COLLEGE HILL INDEPENDENT | www.THEINDY.org
 b y  D a v i d A d l e r,  M i m i  D w y e r,  a n d  E r i c a  S c h w i e g  e r s h a u s e n
 I l l u s t r a t i o n s  b y  B e c c a  L e v i n s o n  a n d  J u l i e t a  C a r d e n a s
NEWS
| 2
4/20 UPDATE
Detroit is a decrepit city—its former in-dustry in dark shambles, its slums rife withpoverty. But don’t worry! Gubernatorialcandidate Geoffrey Fieger has the solu-tion: legalize marijuana and prostitutionand thus create “the new Amsterdam.”Like fairy dust, all it would take is a sprin-kle of Euro-style “coffee shops” and afew streets where sad women can danceslowly in cages and Detroit would be backon its feet. Such revisions would “makeDetroit a fun city,” Fieger asserted. “Theywould flock here.” Of course, who “they”were was left entirely unclear. Perhaps“they” are thousands of venture capital-ists seeking a weed-and-prostitute friendlyenvironment to house the new decade’sSilicon Valley. Or, perhaps, it’s the same“they” who flock to the old Amsterdam:18-year-old stoners dropping daddy’smoney for a Eurotrip looking to get
 sobaked 
, bro. When asked how these policychanges would help education and unem-ployment, feathered-haired Fieger retort-ed, “Detroit couldn’t get much worse.”Though this statement is outright false(see: Detroit with more drugs and moreprostitutes), Fieger’s claim is merely anoutgrowth of a larger movement towardmarijuana legality that is growing by theday.In a recent poll conducted by Pew Re-search Center, the percentage of Ameri-cans who support the legalization of mari- juana has grown from 16 to 45 in the pasttwenty years; those against it shrunk from81 percent to only 50. Meanwhile, Cana-dian judge Donald Taliano swiftly struckdown many parts of Canadian law againstmarijuana this week, giving the govern-ment 90 days to either appeal the ruling orreform its strict laws regarding marijuana.At the end of this 90-day period, growing,possessing, and smoking pot will becomelegal (100 points for Canada).With such fervor sweeping throughthe hemisphere, it’s hard to label Fiegeran outlier. Our twenty-first century mani-fest destiny is unfolding—let’s just hopeDetroit à la Amsterdam doesn’t lie at itsend.
–DALADY LIBERTY FOREVER COM-MEMORATES SIN CITY KNOCKOFF
The Las Vegas hotel and casino NewYork-New York received a literal stampof approval from the U.S. Postal Servicethis week: apparently, the recently issuedStatue of Liberty Forever stamp is basedon a photograph of the casino’s 14-year-old replica. That’s right: what you mayhave assumed was a headshot of the repu-table statue in New York Harbor that hasushered in huddled masses for the past 125years actually depicts a half-size imitationthat welcomes drunken gamblers to a Go-tham-themed Disneyland.The blunder was brought to atten-tion last week when
 Linn’s Stamp News
, theleading publication for American philate-ly, pointed out what in hindsight seem likesome fairly obvious tip-offs. Apparentlythe hair on the two statues is different, thereplica’s eyes are much more sharply de-fined, and the fake crown has dark areasinstead of windows. Others point out thatthe faux figure has a wider nose, more dis-tinct eyelids, and a furrowed brow, as wella curious rectangular patch located on thecenter spike of its half-size crown.The USPS remains largely unper-turbed by the revelation and has statedthat it doesn’t plan to pull the stamp out of circulation. Perhaps with good reason. Af-ter all, as Gordon Absher, spokesman forMGM Resorts International, pointed out:“Everyone thought the post office was justhonoring one great American institution,when in reality they were honoring two—the Statue of Liberty and Las Vegas.”Roy Bettes, manager of communityrelations for the Postal Service in Wash-ington, said that although the post officehad no idea that the photograph was not of the original (apparently the Postal Serviceused stock photography and neglected toread the caption), “there are no errors onthe stamp, so we’re not recalling them.”Jay Bigalke, associate editor of 
 Linn’s
, told NPR’s Robert Siegel that this incidentwill go down in history as one of the big-gest philatelic blunders of all time. “Thisis right up there with the Grand Canyonmistake that they made…where they ac-cidently printed a caption underneaththe Grand Canyon photograph that said‘Grand Canyon, Colorado,’” Bigalke said.
–ES
 W E E K   I N  R E V I E W
 
VIVA GERIATRIC REVOLUCIÓN
This Tuesday, Cuban government officialsstrapped the wheels onto their respiratorsand swept the dust off their state-subsi-dized walkers for the first convention of the Cuban Communist Party Congress infourteen years. The geriatric members of Congress met at the demand of presidentRaul “Sunshine” Castro, 79, and his broth-er Fidel “Not Dead” Castro, 84, intent onappointing a “new generation” of Cubanleadership to helm the crumbling state.While numerous commentators havespeculated that the Cuban governmentwill complete its slow opening to capital-ist investment after the Castro brothers join that big revolution in the sky, Fidelinsisted that the new leadership will “de-fend, preserve and continue perfectingsocialism, and never permit the return of capitalism” in Cuba. He proceeded to an-nounce his resignation from the second-in-command position in the cabinet.Castro named José Ramón Mach-ado, 80, as the new head of the Com-munist Party, and Ramiro Valdés, 79, ashis lieutenant, citing a dearth of compe-tent younger leadership in the govern-ment. (Kids these days just don’t sporta .12-gauge and ammo overalls with thesame swagger they used to.) The two newappointees fought alongside Castro in theoriginal revolution. They are also mem-bers of the hardworking witch coven suc-cessfully working to keep members of theregime alive forever. Indy
 
staff memberscan’t wait ‘til their first wrinkle—we hearthat is the first step to spearheading a suc-cessful revolution these days, and to fuck-ing like Che.
–MD

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