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The Merciad, Nov. 20, 1951

The Merciad, Nov. 20, 1951

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The Merciad, Nov. 20, 1951
The Merciad, Nov. 20, 1951

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7K*6e
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Ik
MERCIAD
M
Vol.
XXIIL
No. 3
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE,
ERIK
PA.
m
November 20, 1951
School Paper,First Class
]
First class honors were awardedto the Merciad for its issues oflast year. The Merciad competeswith colleges throughout thecountry who put out a monthlynewspaper.The judging of the newspapersis done by officials of the
Associat
ed Collegiate
Pressgwho
analyzeeach publication in terms of typography, organization, style, coverage, creativeness, and content.The Merciad was rated high inits editorials, in .typography, andin the vitality of its news stories.
Thefpurpose
of the service isnot to create rivalry amongschools
butfto provide^the
newspaper staff with an analysis of itspast work. The staff may thencorrect past mistakes and improveits weak ^-points. The
association
issues a scorebook which lists thepublication's value in each department.
Sodality
ExtendsProbation Period
A
•this1
cy»
different plan is being usedyear by the Mercyhurst Col-Sodality in regard
.to
the re-
Senior
DirectorsPresent DramasFor
Janus\Club
Under the direction of twoSeniors, Claire Todd and
Beifcsy
Meehan, two one-act plays werepresented to Janus club membersand pledges at the meeting, of November 19. In directing theseplays,Miss Meehan and Miss Toddcompleted requirements for acourse in play production.Miss Todd's play
"Wrong
Numbers," by Essex Dane, was a tri-
logue
woven around two suspectedshop-lifters and
an
unsuspectingwaitress. The cast included Barbara Haner, Pauline Solida, andBarbara Buerkle, with Mary Mul-
lansy
as stage
manager.!
"Sacrifice in Brocade," MissMeehan's choice, was
a
drama
written
by Olive Price, concerning the
eventful
life of Marie Adelaide, Young Duchess
of
"Luxemburg, forced to abdicate herthrone after the first World War,to insure ithe future peace andwell-being of her country.Members
^of the?
cast includedDonnaJByers, Joann Ryan, MaryO'Donnell, Theresa Gorny, andPat Royer. Dee Rudzlnski wasacting stage manager and thecrew consisted of Anita Santo-
ceptlon
of freshmen into the menna, Dolores Olsavick, andLeague of OurjLady. Heretofore,the new
sodalists
were received onthe primary feast of the Sodality,which is the
Fer-st
of the Immaculate Conception, on December 8.This year the prospective memberswill have a longer probation
period,
to prepare them for entrance.Mary Jo Royer, prefect of thSodality, reports that probationclasses are held each Sunday from12:30 to 1:30 for the freshmen.Here they learn
£
just
what*
theSodality is. Stress is being' placedon
a
statement quoted manytimes by
ths
prefect, "The Sodality is a way of life, and not Justan organization."The actual date for reception ofthe new members has not beenannounced. However, there willstill*be
a|
Communion
breakfast
December 8. In charge of arrangements is Our Lady's Committee. IThe program for the Feast Dayobservance has not yet been completed.Mary McCarthy.
Red CrossPlans Action
•Now .that
the school year is infull swing, the Red Cross Intercollegiate Council is again organ-
izediand
ready for action. Thisaction consists in the joint-planning of entertainment for thehospitals and old folks homes,translations of foreign letters andalbums, the
^recruitment
andoperation of the Blood CollectingUnit, as well as other smaller Jobs.December
6—Lecture
by Elizabeth
Bentley
December
14—Freshman
Christmas PartyDecember 15—Orphans' PartyDecember
16—Christmas
PageantThe Council is comprised of students and faculty
a
advisors fromMercyhurst, Gannon, Villa, Behr-end Center, and Edinboro. Representing Mercyhurst on
(the
Council are Marilyn Kelley,
£
DorisMoore, (Mickey O'Donnell, andJody Ryan, with Miss Joan Ferguson as advisor.
jEich
college has selected onerepresentative
-to
serve on the executive committee land presideover the
meetings^in
their ownschool.
Doris]
Moore has beenchosen as representative fromMercyhurst.On Wednesday, November 7, a
dinner-meeting
was held at Edinboro, at which plans for (the Veterans' Entertainment on November 13 were discussed and formu-December
18—-Christmas
Din-
-
ate
d.
*£ctfe
P*£44
TZelecue
A MILE-GRAM from Mademoiselle announces the appointmentof Nancy Lou Zeller, senior artstudent, to
Mademoiselle's
CollegeBoard. She is one of 700 studentswho
competedj
with applicantsfrom colleges all over the countryto win a place on the
board.lshe
will complete three assignments
•that
will help her explore her interest and abilities in art, in competition! for one of twenty QuestEditorships to be awarded by themagazine next June.
Party PlansUnder
Way
Freshmen are hard at work onplans for their Christmas party.The
da-te
for the affair has beenset for Friday evening, December
14,
amidst the holiday atmospherof the college auditorium.
a
Committees have been namedand are busy preparing for thisyearly affair. Marge Cummiskeyis in charge of entertainment.Barbara Buerkle, decorations;Lynn Nelson, gifts; Dolores Olsavick, invitations; Mary ReeTheuerkauf, tables and favors;Mary Ann Nash, refreshments;and Mary Jane O'Dell, clean-up.Joan Walsh and Catherine McCarthy are general chairman and
co
*chairman.Plans include some unique ideasin decoration and a Christmaspresentation with a theme whichlends itself to festive scenery.Speaking
for
the freshman class,Joan Walsh has invited all facultymembers, students,
and!
Mercyhurst employees to join in thecelebration.nerDecember
19—Lighting
of theCribThe next meeting will be heldat seven o'clock, Wednesday, December
5,
at
Gannon College.The official proclamationis . . . our Christmas vacationwill be one day longer, beginning at
noan
on Thursday, De-ember 20, 1951.
OperationPraeterita
At the present time, seniors andunderclassmen who are membersof the Praeterita
*
staff are oc-cupied with the task of compilingan interesting and factual yearbook for Mercyhurst students.Juniors and Sophomores havebeen selected for the staff to acquaint them with
ithe
proceduresinvolved. Their experience willhelp them in future years.Editor-in-chief, Joan Young,has already begun work on thepublication with the aid of sec-tion heads and their committees.Dorothy Roth, business editor, isassisted by Anita Santomenna,Anne Downing, and Helene Arents,in arranging the patron section.The combined staffs are making a determined effort to surpassthe First Class Rating achieved bythe 1951 edition in the judging bythe National Scholastic Press Association.
Former Communist
Spy
To Explain Party
Dec.
"The
Apathy
of the Catholic College Student" will be thetopic of a lecture on
December
6, at 8:15 in
the ^Mercyhurst
College auditorium. ElizabethBentley,former Communist
Partylmember,
will explain Communist efforts to ensnarecollege students into the Party thinking.
*
l
Students may know at least a little about Communism,that it
attracts
its
members
by deceit, using every conceivablekind of
organization
— from college groups to social groupsto powerful unions to
infiltmte
trained Communists, thatthey may spread the Communist thinking.Elizabeth Bentley was only one of many intelligentAmericans who fell into the Communist trap. A graduate of
|Vassar,
Miss Bentley did graduate
Pres id en
tlReports
On
Home
Ec
ClubOpen
House
Plans
Mercyhurst students receivedwith enthusiasm the recent announcement that the Home Ecclub will sponsor an Open Houseat Mercyhurst on November 30.Menbers of the club,
iunder
th*direction of Mary Jane Seman,president, have chosen the OpenHouse as their annual money-making project. Tentative plansinclude charging admission to theMercyhurst students as well as toothers who attend.The club expects to make arrangements for a local orchestrato provide the
-rhythms for
dancing. The lounge, given a face-lifting for the occasion,
willjbe
theperfect spot to sit out a numberor two and get acquainted withthat "someone new." Refreshments will be one of the highlightsof the
evening
and the refreshment committee lists,
along
withthe other committee announcements, will soon be posted. EveryHome Ec. club member will receive an assignment and Miss Seman is confident that, "If everymember
dees
her part, this OpenHouse will be
-the
biggest and bestMercyhurst has ever seen and themost successful project in the history of our club."Will You Help?Another project in quite a
dift-
erentt
vein which will soon beundertaken by the Home Ec clubis volunteer work at our local veterans* hospital. Club membershave offered -their
servicesjin
answer to an appeal from Mr. Net-zen, Director of Services at thehospital, for volunteers* to read,write letters, play quiet games,and, in general, offer some companionship to non-ambulatory patients. An announcement will bemade of the days and specifictimes
after a
plan has been drawn
up
Sin
cooperation
with Mr. Net-zen. Miss Seman made clear thatanyone interested in this workshould not hesitate to offer herservice even if she is not a HomeEc club member. Everyone is welcome and the only qualificationsare
interest
and a willingness to
work.
work at Columbia. Following ayear of study at the University ofFlorence, Italy, she returned tothe U. S. in the midst of the depression. Anxious to alert Americans to the dangers of Fascism,she joined theAmerican:LeagueAgainst War and Fascism. Takenin by
rthis
high sounding nameand the announced principles ofthis-organization, she was event
ually
astonished to find that she
had?actually
joined a Communistgroup. But the aims of the Party
appealed
to her sense of righteousness and she became a trusted
undergroun d
fworker.
By 1945 the cold awful truthhad finally penetrated. The decision was hard, but soon Miss
Bent
ley went to the
F.B
J
J
Learningthat she had been under theirsurveillance
for
over a fyear, itwas
arrangedffchat
she would remain with the Party as a
counter
spy for the F. B. I.Since leaving the Party in 1948,Miss Bentley has testified beforeseveral jOongressional Investigating Committees.
Afterlreceiving
instructions
from|His
Excellency,Bishop Fulton J. Sheen, she wasreceived into the Catholic Church.
NFCCS
Meeting
I
To
BeiHeld
Here
*
On
I S aturda
y, December
t
1,Mercyhurst College | will| be
fhost
to the council meeting of the LakeErie Region
of the
National
fed
eration of
Catholic?College
Students. The council meeting is heldfour times
a?,year.
the purpose ofwhich is
to
solve problems withinthe
^region
and to make suggestions, to Ithe members of theregion that will enable them tohave a stronger working power inthe federation.This year a new plan is to beinaugurated; it will
be
Ithe first
Council
meeting where seniordelegates will not give reports;the regional chairmen will givereports on their particular committees
citing
the work of eachschool.Judy Carlow,
|senior
delegate,and Frances Sullivan, junior delegate, will represent Mercyhurst.P a t r i c a Curran, commissionchairman for International Relations,will be present (to give herreport on the progress of theMercyhurst commission.
 
Page Two
THE
MERGIAD
November 20, 1951
Live
For
Hisj Coming
"Wake up, wake up, you sleepyfheads; oh, please hurry!He's coming and we must prepare/' they cried, and
thenfthey
hurried on — telling others.
"He's
coming .
g
. we
must^
prepare." "Who's coming . . .why must we prepare?"
"Is
it important; do we need a newdress?" "Please, quickly tell us."It is Christ
theftenderest
of friends; as He first came inthe flesh, He now comes to the soul, full of love for those who
arefready
to receive Him.During Advent, our Lord knocks at the
doer
of all men'shearts; He comes to ask if they have room for Him.
fAdvent
is
ow
time to direct all our faculties to
1 lis
praiseand honor, by offering* all our prayers, Masses, and sacrificesin a spiritual bouquet to be placed at the Infant's crib. Wemust live this season of Advent to the fullest; then truly we
\>ill
be able to sing as the angels sang,
"Gloriatin
excelsis
Deo!"
1
I
PREFECT REFLECTS:
Dear
God,
mm
^
i
We Thank You
Tithes
Still
Concern
Us
How Grown-up
Is
Uncle Sam?
^How
grownup is
UnelefSam?
For years now we'velbeendepicting him as an old man with
a'white
beard — somewhat on the order of Father Time. But when you really
think
about it, he's
only|175
years old; next to the mother countriesof Europe,
a^babe
in arms, especially when it comes to international relations. For {most of his
young
life he politicallyignored the
world,
as best he could. Come 1914, he found
thef ^
.
-
#
«^-world sitting in his lap. For thirty-six years he's been
trying?]
Stjjljn PfOtS
to
find!
out what to do
with
it
howlto
act;-—
with quite afew growing pains.. . . for our lives, which we try tolive right
ly
for Your honor and
glory; I
*
. . . for our minds, which we develop
in
order to know You andlove You to the utmost;, . , for our souls and the manyopportunities of receiving Yourgrace;. . . for cur wills, free to followthe pa.th leading directly to You;... for our parents, teachers, andclassmates, who
help £
us grow tothat maturity we so desire;. . .
for
our classes, which prepareus to meet the problems of our
age;
-
. . . for our activities—dances,sports, plays, and entertainments
—'Which
round out the social sideof our natures;. . . for our country, which we areproud to call the "land off the
free;" f
*
'£.
jg jj
. . . for our school, fountain ofspiritual, intellectual, and socialopportunities.Accept our thanks,
O
God, forthese and other numerous benefits which we, Your children, possess. May our love and devotionfor You increase each day untilat last
we
I
are with You, OurFather, in Heaven.
Take this
.business
about American relations with theVatican. The United States* has been making up its mindabout this in fits and starts. Some can't see the value of communication with a friendly state which contains valuable,unique, international
information.lPresidents
usually can, butlack the power to convince othersfadequately. Recently themost important and most final attempt was made to settle theissue. How was the attempt, the appointment of anfambassa-dor to Vatican City, made? It was announced two full monthsbefore it could possibly be ratified. The person appointed wasnot eligible to he appointed. It was announced at
the
timecampaigns for the presidential
nominations|werejgetting
under way.Now how was the attempt received? A storm of protest!There will no longer be separation of church and state in theUnited States (logical?). It is singling out one religion forrecognition and prestige. The fact that Vatican City is an
autonomous
state and that the Catholic Church has someinternational prestige was established quite a while
ago.
Thepoint is, will the United States recognize these two facts?Well, this corner thinks that an ambassador to the Vatican would be beneficial to the
United States,>especiallyfin
combating Communism which is evil. Nothing has happenedof an enslaving nature to the forty-three nations now holding diplomatic relations with the Vatican
|to
make us feelotherwise. But how has Uncle Sam acted about this international step? Like Baby Sam.
Our Downfall
What's
'the nextfmove?
So farmost of Stalin's plans have beencarried out. His aim is to scatterthe sheep by striking the shepherd.We've seen this at work. A primate ischarges),until he "confesses."lower clergy have the"coUaborate or suffer."instances, they havetheir loyalty to thearrested (on falsegiven a trial (unjust),
torturedB
Then
fthe
choice ofIn manypledged
THE MERCIAD
Mercyhurst College, Erie,Pa.Member ofAssociated Collegiate Press
Editor
1
Frances SullivanAssociate Editor _L|
2
r.
1Mary Lou DwyerAssistant
Editors
---l-£-
Plorene
Cherry, Jean
Drouhard
Business
Editor
.
%
Claire ToddEditorial
Staff
1
.__
Pauline Solida, Joan Harrison, ClaireAgliata, Patricia Moran, Mary Jo
Royer,
Ceci Wert, HelenFogarty, Mary Jo Babowicz, Norma Jean Scott, ThedaBest, Doris Moore.
i
3.
f
Business Staff
1 1 Corinne
Prenatt, Dorothy Roth,Lucreta Burger, Anita Santomenna,
Bernadette
Bell, RitaShanahan.
"people's
democracy"
in
order toremain with their flock and givewhat help they can.Stalin wants
'the
people leftwithout the guidance of 'the clergy,so that his "people's priests" mayre-educate the confused people.To the Vatican are sent lettersfrom
the|people
asking how theyoan keep the faith; Radio Vaticantries
'to
give the answers and somedegree of courage. But the Churchwill not, and cannot, make concessions on dogma or on moralprinciples.
.
Stalin vs. The Church
£
The destruction of the CatholicChurch is to be
broughit
about in
two
lsteps: (1) isolation of ftheclergy from Rome and the creation of a schismatic nationalchurch controlled by the Redregime; and (2) by liquidation.Breaking
the^link
with Rome andthe Pope
is
attempted by reducing the Church
ts
poverty by confiscation of its property, demanding an oath of allegiance to the"people's democracies," and by anintense program of conversion tocommunism by re-education.The weapons of the Church arespiritual.
In
1949 'those
professing
Communism were denied thesacraments, and, las enemies ofpod, were excommunicated.
|
Butthe Church
Is
prepared, if necessary, to go underground. Persecutions,! worse than those of theRomans, are predicted.If you are interested in yourfaith, then read "What Stalin Hasin Mind for Catholics," by ErnestO. Ha user,
In
the September
22,
1951 issue of "Saturday
Evenin
Post." It's
in
our library.
Do you have a budget? If
so,
you can see
easily
how muchmoney you spend and for what. If
not;
why not keep track ofyour spendings for a week or two to help you
figure
out wherethe money goes so quickly.One place that it does Not go is into the collection basketon Thursday morning. You are probably saying to yourselfas you now stop reading this article, "You might know an-
other
appeal formoney."This is more than just an appeal, however, it is a reminder of an obligation. It
usedfto
be that the obligation wasto contribute tithes of all that one possessed. Just
think-of
what a tenth of the value of our
^
Qf ug can work oufc a ntUe
scheme to help our memories,something like putting the moneyin our caps Wednesday night.But however we do it, pleaselet us make the collection basketeach Thursday morning,
indica-t-
lng
that we are mature Catholicwomen, cognizant of our duties toour Church, and filled with loveof God and a desire to help spreadHis Gospel.clothes and shoes and Jewelryamounts
|to!
And how about atenth of the money we
spendjon
movies? Or dinners? Or cigar
ettes?
The idea of tithes may be gone,but we are still obliged by one ofthe commandments cf the Churchto contribute to the support of theChurch.Women's Rights and DutiesWe do a lot of talking about being women now,
aibout
our rights,and about being allowed to assume responsibility instead of being treated
flike
children. This isright, and it is
good,
but thosewho want the rights of adultsmust accept the duties of adults.If we want to learn responsibility,let us begin with this one respon
sibility
to Holy Mother Church.Here at Mercyhurst we contribute especially to the missionarywork which Christ Himself commanded His Church to do. Itwould
te
possible to write pageson the wonderful work done by themissionaries and of the great needthat
ithey
have for our money, butthere! is not one of us who doesnot already know this.Scheme for
Failing
MemoriesMaybe our biggest trouble fissimply that in our haste to be ontime for line-up, we
forget,
ourmoney. Aside from being able tomake up one week for what weforgot the week before,
fperhape
Woeful Woman
Down the bannisters of heavenslide
-the
snowflakes!They reign in sparkling grandeurin her curls;They rest for but a moment onher shoulders, J
ThenI
run to meet fthe wind in
silvr'y
swirls.
*9B
Yet she walks on and cannot seetheir beauty,
|
jflHH
And harkens not
%
their
pleai
tostop and play.
W^^m
£
^^B|
Silently, softly,
fsadlyithenJ
the
snowflakesf
1KB
KB?
3With muted
weeping,Imelt
themselves
away.Ik
mm
^9P
And still she walks today, cold,unperceivlng
Of*
the
i
magicfsplendor
of eachdawning day,
B^|HCM
Her rwhole life but an echo of theevening
•Hnf^EHIIK
She could
notfstop
m
snowflakes play.to watch the
Around
thetTurntable
From the shrinkage guaranteeon our new cashmere sweater tothe color cf ourtoothpaste,we areusually influenced in our choosing among otherwise standardproducts by some quality| whichmakes our choice outstanding or
"different."
So it is in
(the
musicbusiness as anywhere else. Most ofus are fascinated by
a&
differenttreatment of a well-known tuneor by an unusual use of a familiar
Instrument.
Some of the newestrecord releases illustrate theclever use of these novel effectsby popular recording stars.Versatile Patti Page became thefirst "multiple voice," with "Tennessee Waltz," recording whichwas the first commercially suc-
Clever
handling of an Instrument
is
illustrated by Stan Freeman's effective harpsichord backing on "Come Ona My House," Inrecognition of Stan's newly-foundpopularity, Columbia has
-recently
released a new album appropriately titled "Come Ona Stan'sHouse." Stan
Is
featured on suchitems as"BlueRoom,""September Song," and "St. Louis Blues."The latest music mags have itthat
this!collection
is a must foranyone looking for something unusual. 1Lastly, and probably newest, isthe haunting effect produced bythe echo chamber. Most of
ithecessfull disc-employing
the "dub-
Les Paul and M
*ry
Ford record-bed voice." This"dubbing-in"
ings
feature multiple electricsimply means
-that
Patti singsalong with herself in four or moresuccessive cuttings of the sametune, thereby
producing
the effectof fourlpersons singing together.Current releases featuring thisnovel voice treatment are Jo
Staf
ford's "Hawaiian War Chant
it
(but who needs Stafford whenwe have
Eisert!)
and Rosemary
Clooney's
Pennies.""If Teardrops Wereguitar backgrounds by Les andsong
jl sty
ings done in the
echo
chamber by Mary. "How High
the
Moon" was the first outstandingsuccess employing these novel innovations. Currently enjoying:popularity is "The World is Waiting For the Sunrise" Sand one
of
their hits-to-be is the
newest,
"Just
One More Chance," alreadyrising fast on the disc
IJockey
shows and Juke-boxes.
 
November
20,*
1951
THE
MERGIAD
YC
S
ObservesSchool Problems
The recent Catholic ActionStudy Day at Niagara Universityis the talk of
all
Catholic
Action
-
ists
these days. Mercyhurst delegates brought the spirit back totheir
campus
r.nd fired their companions with the ideas and resolutions gained there.Alarm clocks sounded off in thewee hours of the morning of the10th and lights
f'ashed
on, as thegirls shivered into their clothesand braved the chilly dark ofmorning to catch the 5:54 bus forBuffalo. Excitement ran high andexpectations rose as dawn beganto paint the eastern sky. Meetingstudents from five other colleges
Page Three
etAonaorirai
ih
Shakespeare
Playhouse Runs
along the way, all headed in thesame direction, all enthusiasticover their Catholic Action work,made the trip seem very short.Prom the opening of the StudyDay with communal "Missa Reci-tata" to the close with Benediction, the earnest work of studentCatholic Action went on. How can
we,
as Catholic Actionists on ourcampuses, best work {together tobetter our schools? What are theproblems with regard to the intellectual aspect? the cultural andsocial aspects?
they<religious?
the
physical?;in
small groups by discussion and argument, agreementand
disagreement,
studentsthrashed
out5these
questions withone another, gaining
new £
insightsand ideas on old problems.!Students who worked togetherall day, played together that night.Piano playing, group ^singing,games, accordian| music, squareand round dancing ended the dayas
onellong-to-be-remembered
by
all.
I
At
the
'Hurst
'Oklahoma' Story
HSBK8S&V
\^
^TTT^TT^" "
"Who's
next" Sis! the pet sayi
ng
of Betsy Peters, MargaretFoley, Virginia Kelly, and Molly Li.
"Last
call for
breakfast!"
It's nine-thirty Saturday
morn
ing and everyone knows it's
timefto
hustle to the Cupboardfor all Mercyhurst students. The array of brightly-coloredrobes gathered around blue tables verifies the fact that thecupboard is, at this time, the most popular place on campus. 1We
perk
around the counter to see the smiling faces offour familiar girls, a few of the home ec students responsiblefor the management of this popular rendezvous!Molly Li hails from Shanghai . . . may be properly calledour Dresden Doll... a petite little miss with|a friendly smile
. . . always willing to help
...
the one you want to see when youwant a job done . . . inquisitive ...likes dancing, swimming, andbasketball ... is a member of theHome Economics Club and Student Council ... is looking forward to becoming a dietitian.Betsy Peters . , . came to Mercyhurst from Detroit, Michigan . . Jtwinkling eyes . . . likes atime . . . small stature, large inheart . . . quiet (at times) . . .active in Home Economics Club,Janus Club, and has been chosenfor membership in Alpha PsiOmega . . . likes golfing and
Mercyhurst GirlsAre
Talking
About...
34BRCYHURST
GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT ... the festivities of the Bishop's jubilee . . . the cold, damp weather that failed todampen spirits at the Big-Little Sister dinner . . . the ghouls and gals
In
our hallowed halls this
hallo
we'en, especially the "headless man"and the "friendly lion," better known outside spookland as RoxannaDowning and Ceci Wert . . . the ever successful NFCCS Ball.MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT ... the outcomeof the elections . . . Mary Anne Hayes' rare
uosilde
down stamp collection .
....
the amazing comeback of the man of the halfcentury—Winston! Churchill . . .
liie
at the practice house . . . secretive
freshmen
and their Christmas party .
.1.
Norma Jean ISoott's;
shorn leeks
. . .those horrid quarterly exams . . . Roseann Andio's frsw but appropriatenickname—"*Pose" . . . the surprise delegation from >St. Bonaven-
ture's
... the turkey dinner.photography . . . entertains withher "Uke" . . . expects to teach.^Virginia Kelly , . . resident ofEllicottville, N. Y. . .
Jgocd
thingscome
inSsmall
packages . . . neverlate . .
.lalways
a friendly smilefor everyone . . . quiet and reserved . .
.can
hardly wait for skiingweather . . . always courteous . . .ambition is to teach . . . membership in Home Economics Club,Y. C. S., and Athletic Associa-
*
tion.Newcomer from Auburn, N.
N.
Y. . . . Margaret Foley . . ,prefers to be called "Markey" . . .peppy cheerleader in high schooldays . . . loves to dance . . . hasa good time any place . . . sunnydisposition . . . collects stuffedanimals . . . stop in at number 3and look
themlover
. . . enjoyshorseback ridingjj. . . future workwill be demonstration or dieteticsposition.Dramatic enthusiasts had a
i
rare treat on the evening of No-ember 8 when some of the great-est Shakespearean scenes werebrought to reality in the Mercyhurst auditorium. Joan and Stanley Cobleigh presented the program which included scenes from"Macbeth,"
"Hami
t," "The Taming of the Shrew", "Romeo andJuliet", and "As
Yru
Like It." The
impressiveness
of the show andthe appreciation of the audience
about the splendid acting, the effective lighting, thevividmusic,and the beautiful costumes.!After the show, I was given thechance to go backstage and speakto the visiting artists.! I reallyfound them to be as entertainingwhen out of the limelight as in,giving me some interesting
facts
about their careers.The Cobleighs have been together for about nineteen years,but their theatrical
history
datesback many years previous (to that.Both were highly educated indramatics and through the years,they have acquired valuable experience.At present, they are giving programs consisting of scenes fromeither Shakespearean or modernplays.They have appeared on television and before clubs and as-
semtolies
throughout the country.At their home in New York, thecouple have two little children,
who,
according to Mrs. Cobleigh,"have
neverfknown
anything buta theatrical background and sur-
roundings.^It
is the mother's ambition to be able
someday|to
juststay home and keep house for herlittle, family.
ISB HB
The Cobleighs
'enjoy gtheir
lifein the
theater,
|
but
its J
greatesthandicap is the constant travelingthe
'work
involves. To break theroutine,
theyfoonduct a
J summertheater in Connecticut.
fjflBMy
As far as hints to prospectivedramatists go, the successfulartists advise staying in
youiiown
hometown and working up an outstanding reputation as an actress.There, New York will find you;you won't find
^New|York.PwmHJ
"Oh what a beautiful morning;Oh what a beautiful day;I've got a beautiful feeling,Everything's going my way."
*-
And everyone will' be going"Playhouse way" when the nextproduction opens the last week ofNovember. Green Grow the Lilacs,by Lynn Riggs, is a sparkling andwistful play of a
cowboy
love storyin the Old Wild West. This comicand sentimental tale involving theeternal triangle is made somethingspecial by
\
the introduction of ahuge cast plus wonderful American folk songs and dances.Oklahoma,
the
Rodgers and
Hammer
stein musical, was takenfrom this play, which, in its Erie.Playhouse production, will starHenderson Forsythe and DorotheaCarlson. Prom observations of rehearsal hall, it promises to be entertaining, colorful, and different
—an
all-round "good show."
Alumnae Plan
Style Revue
Mercyhurst Alumnae associa
tion ^announces
its major eventfor the Fall season. It is -to be astyle show and dessert party, taking place at the college, Saturday,November 24.
Thefproceeds
fromthe party are to be donated tothe Scholarship
Fun&
Committee chairmen for theevent have been announced by thewco-chairmen, Mrs*; James
^Van
Scoter and (Mrs. Robert
Farmonj
and
are!as
follows: Mrs. ArthurL. Stephens and Mrs. John Quinn,reservations;
Mrs,}Charles
Emling,correspondence; Mrs. Leo McCabe,decorations;
I Miss
I
Mary
Devine,arrangements; MiSs Virginia Jonesand
MisslJoan
Gibbons,5refresh
ments ;
k
and
Mrs. Maurice Jones,
publicity.
pj^m^JBfe3BB
H
Miss Betty Cairns is in^ chargeof the style show! which will besponsored by the Hazel! DalyYeager Shoppe.
H^HR
ne
si
MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT
.1.
. Betty Seymour's bruised knees . . . the funeral held to commemorate the sad endof field hockey . . . this year's first
meeting
of Great Books . . .
"Q!ig"
O'Dell's
massaging techniques
.1.
. Mary Anne Benetin's avid interest
in
English Literature . . . the sock being knit by the Freshmen "enmasse" or "a mess" . . . Barb Tonry and Helen
Elsert's
favorite game,pickup—sticks?!. . . Plans for the Home Ec. open house.MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT ... the GannonJunior Prom . . . Bet Brodrick's theme, "I
wa'k
alone" . . . the freshmen-junior basketball game . . . oh, well, it's the best out of three . . ."Sissy" McCabe's artistic talent . . . "Ike's" political aspirations!. . .space cadets . . . the
weather's
somersault ... "A Place in the Sun . . ,the Bermuda vacation Corky Prenatt
is
contemplating . . . the possibility of being snowed in for another Thanksgiving Vacation . . .
will bathe
the
droooine spirits
in delight,
beyond the bliss of
d
reams
Milton's
Com
us
Milton must have peered into a crystalball to write these lines. How elsecould he have foretold the delicious,
refreshing
goodness of Coca-Cola?
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY
OF THE
COCA-COLA COMPANY
BY
X
ERIE COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
® 1951,
THE
COCA-COtA COMPANY*e>
I*]

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