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The Merciad, Oct. 26, 1984

The Merciad, Oct. 26, 1984

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Oct. 26, 1984
The Merciad, Oct. 26, 1984

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Published by: TheMerciad on May 25, 2011
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Jf
V0LJ58
NO.
6OCTOBER
26,1984
New
trimester calendar proposed
iThe college administration submit-ted a new calender proposal this weekto the Mercyhurst Student Government
j
and to the College Senate Committee.William P. Garvey, president
of
Mer-cyhurst College,
said,
"The ad-
ministration will stay with
the 4-3-3
calender as long as the college com-munity supports it."
$
4
Academic Dean,
Dr.
David Palmer
said,
"The
4-3-3 calender
is a
popularand workable choice at
Mercyhurst.
"1
The newly proposed 4-3-3 calenderallows for further
-development
of
thepresent calender, he added.
$.
Palmer admits that
"it
would be toodifficult
to
open
up a
semester^
calender at Mercyhurst."
||
Advantages
of the
proposedcalender
are
consistency with other in-stitutions
in the
Erie community.Palmer said that the new calender
wil
coordinate "just as easy" with the VillaMaria College calender.
£
f Many
of
the nursing majors here
at
Mercyhurst Ihave
conflictingschedules due to the differences in theacademic calenders. Therefore, theyare
not
able
to
coordinate theirvacations.
|
. ..
g «
Other advantages include startingearlier in September and ending earlierin May. Also, more time is allotted bet-ween terms.Two major obstacles
of
convertingto
a
semester calender include
the
limitations
of
space and the inflexibili-ty
of
scheduling courses and faculty.As
a
result of the new proposal, MSGpostponed its survey which they wereconducting this week.
*•?
Four members
of
MSG, Pat Songer;
MSG
asked to donate
tov^ardslf u ndi d ri ve i
*
By Lori Martin
The Mercyhurst Student Govern-ment was aproached by Dr. William
P.
Garvey,
president
1
of
the
college,
to
donate
between $15, 000 and $25,000towards the capital fund drive.|tt has
not
been decided how muchmoney MSG will contribute overall.However, this year MSG says
it
willgive $6,000 but will not commit itself
fortthe
other two years.
I£j
The money MSG donates will be putinto
a
restrictedfund.MSG
is
not be-ing forced to donate but "Giving wouldhelp us out with the administration,"MSG President Pat Songer
said.
In other
MSG
business,
the
academic honesty proposal which wassent
to
the Senate last year was sentback
to the
government
for
furtherrevision.
-
3
The proposal
-was
drawn
up
to
reduce cheating. Students caughtcheating on a test or paper accountingfor 20 percent
or
more
of
the coursegrade, the student would receive a 0.0for the course. ?
ftjSTests
or term papers worth less than20 percent, the student would receivea 0.0 on that particular test
or
paper.The faculty found faults with the pro-posal.Therefore, an MSG committeewill revise it* -MSG proposed not to accept the labhours proposal.
It
was suggested thatit remain open through winter term.Last week,
Dr.
David Palmer,Academic Dean of the college, extend-ed lab hours from 10 p.m.
to
11 p.m.The student
governments has-been
invited
to the
United Nations Con-ference
in
New York.
* g | |
The conference will
take £
place
in
April.Eight students will be allowed toparticipate.Students interested in attending theconference should contact
the
MSGConference.
^t
0
Also,students who need transporta-tion
to
Cleveland, Buffalo,
or
Pitt-sburgh for the holidays should sign upin the MSG office.
J|
The
nex£'MSG
meeting will be heldon Sunday, October 28 at 7:30 p.m.
in
114Zurni
I
president and Bill Petrella,
Al
Sattler,and Barb Sayers; representatives,
began
| seeking student's opinionsregarding
f
thegtrimester-semester
issue.
I
![§
However, the committee would liketo present students with all options.
£
To make
it a
complete survey,Songer
said,
they will poll studentsagain next week and include the newproposal.
I I
Songer
said,
they began pollingresidents
insBaldwin
Hall and Mer-cyhurst Apartments earlier this week.Students had the option
of
selectingthe present trimester calender
or the
alternative semester schedule.
-
%£
The students polled Indicated theypreferred
the
present system. About90 percent favored trimesters, while 10percent opted
for
semesters, Songerstated.
J
Upon receiving
the new
proposal,the
MSG
committee decided
to
discontinue the survey at that point."We want to acquire proper informa-jypn."
Songer
said.
"Thalls
whaLouj;survey was trying to
6o£*&$
]***?
j
The MSG
president;
expects
to ob-
tain valid results before Thanksgiving.Time
is the
important element.Therefore, Songer wants to "act on theissue now."
f
The result of the survey will be hand-ed down to thecollege^Senate.In
turn,
the
Senate will makerecommendations.
i
\ t
However,
if
Songer believes he is notgetting
a
fair shake
in
the Senate,
he
will
go
directly
fto
the
collegepresident.
Proposed
1985-86
Calendar
FALIiTERM
September
4-November
21
|
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
g
Classes
-
70 minutes
jj
Tuesday, Thursday Classes -100minutes
+
Four Classes TakenFall Weekend Included
I
WINTER
TERMl
December 2-February 21|
H
December 3-20,Classes December
21
-January 6,Christmas Break
MorrdayTWedneStfaTarra FTfaa;
Classes - 80 minutesTuesday, Thursday Classes
-115minutes
.
SPRING
|TERM
. March
10-May
15Easter Break the same
Master
after;
By Naomi
Romanchok
First
of a
series
-
i
Increasing male enrollment and pur-chasing Sesler apartments are two
of
the objectives achieved the past threeand
a
half years through
the
MasterPlan.
H
Reviewing the Master Plan Indicatesa good percentage
of
the proposalshave been carried out on
time4"It
wasa wish list,
a
hope list,
a
dream list,"Mercyhurst
College|President
WilliamP. Garvey
said.
| |
-*m§
$
u
We|hoped tofaccomplish
seventypercent
of it and
we're fdoingreasonably
well,"
he added.*:
| I
Upon becoming president of the
col-
lege four years ago, Dr. Garvey lookeddown the road and made short range
projections
dealing with the future
of
the college.The basic purpose
off
the MasterPlan was to "give a sense
of
directionin what we hoped to do," Garvey
said.
1
Increasing the male ratio was once ahope, but now
it
is a reality.
j
reviewedyear mark
called
If
or
48|per-
^population
to be
of the {presentThe Master Plancent
of
the student
male£
fe.
The?
statistics
^^^
freshmen class show the college fellshort
of
itsgoal.
5
| f
|
Forty-four percent
are
males while56 percent are females. These figuresarecomparable!
with
national collegeaverages
of
53 percent female and 47percent*male.
f*
f
^Other
aspects pertaining to the com-position
of
the student body revealsthe college
is
becoming moreresidential.Currently, about 700 students live oncampus. Sixty
percent
live
in
collegehousing with another 10 percent in offcampus housing.
| &
While
thelnumberfof
residents hasincreased|the number
of
commutershas decreased by 30 percent!
Iff
'•-•%
fGarveyl
looks at this fact with "mixedblessings.'! More residents^ create
a
better campus life and
a
more|trad§jtional
college, he
said.
On|the
other hand,
a
higher percen-tage
of
commuters requires less cam-pus housing.
,£
1
Some commuters
do
choose
to
reside
on
campus. About* 30 Erieresidents live on campus.
|
1
More|housing
became
a
necessityduring
thefpast three-years
as the
number
of
out-of-town students
con-
tinued
to
rise.£•
|i
The college
purchased
the
Seslerand Baldwin apartments and spentone million dollars for both complexes.Increasing enrollment and housing
facilities!were|two
of the
prioritiesrevealed through the
Mastef
Plan.
|
(However,
academics also played
a
vital part
in
the future
of
|the
college.In terms
of
faculty, 40 percent holddoctorate degrees. This
figure
is closeto
the 50
percent| projection
statec
*
three and
a
h a
years
ago.jt
J|g§|l
h
|The
fMaster Plarf^also attained
another^
goal
in
terms
of|
fullftime
faculty members*
AUthe
present time,80 percent are full time.
 
PAGE
2
THE MERCIADOCTOBER
26,1984
WMCY
celebrates
fourth
birthday
Dean explainsacademic policies
By Naomi
Romanchok
Today, October 26,academic progress reports aredue in the registrar's office.According to AcademicDean,
Dri
David Palmer, thepurpose of the progessreports is
"to
inform studentsand their advisors of any pro-blem in a particular student'sactivity in a class."Progress reports are Issuedwhen a student's work is notup to their abilities. Progressreports are a
"warning
to perk
up.
and do better in
class
work," Palmer
said.
Theywarn students who may at thispoint have a failing grade.
*
The dean believes progressreports are up as "a piece
of y
Information for the student'sbenefit."
t
It may be the middle of fallterm but winter courseschedules will be available inmid-November. Registrationtakes place November 19 and
20.
hz&&*
i
Palmer explains that "thesystematic approach taken bySr. Marcia has
i
made thewhole process smoother."First,
J
the foundation anddistribution core courses
are~j
secured for availablity pur-poses. Next, departmentdirectors" are consulted
fn
order to work out major courseschedules.
* '.
The dean then checks to in-sure there are proper numbersof evening classes being of-fered. He also determines thetotal of interdisciplinary andsenior core courses available.Also followed up on are thelength of classes. "We usuallystop classes at 3 p.m. so theydon't interfere
with
scheduledactivities," Palmer
said.
JThe dean also
^
has tobalance the faculty
course
load.
In the final stages, he Isresponsible for smoothing outany other rough edges In theproposed schedule.
~:>
Palmer said
a'course
willnot be cancelled until the se-cond or third class is^held.Cancellation occurs when lessthan seven students attend anon-major course.
s
On the
topicfi
of grade ap-peals, the dean admits he pro-bably
getsr'one
a term".Palmer claims that studentshave the "right to appeal".When a case is brought tohim by a student,; the deanseeks the course syllabus "todetermine a precise, clear
in-
dication of the grading scale."After
he
talks to the student,the dean approaches thefaculty member involved. Thiswhole process probably takesa week.
\
Only once in five years has acase been so extreme that itneeded to be taken to theAcademic Policy Committee.By Greg Hernandez 4Four years ago on MondayOctober
29,
the campus radiostation, WMCY, aired its first
program
&
j The station will becelebrating its birthday onMonday at 9p.m. in the
Stu-
dent Union with a special pro-gram examining the station'sprogress.WMCY will also
bej
pro-viding free birthday cake andpunch between the hours of9-11 p.m. The station will bebroadcasting
live
during thistime.
|
According to Faculty Ad-visor Steve Curcio, this Is thefirst time anything like thishas been attempted by theradio station. The reason forthe party, he
said,"It
gets usout of the studio and makesus more visible to thestudents.' |It was on this date at 9 p.m.when Curcio aired "War of theWorlds,"
a
radio drama by H.G.
Wells.
If
\
ff
|
The inception of a radio sta-tion was developed by AndrewRoth director of the com-munications department
*
atthe time, and Dr. David
Palmer,
•,
director of
jit
hehumanities department.
«&
Dr. Palmer and Roth said the
college
hired Curcio to get
the
station on its feet.
C
The home of the penguin, as
It
is now called, was first
|
located on the second floor ofthe library.
*
However, Richard Ragan,present director of the com-munications department saidthe first roots of (he stationwere developed from an af-filiation with WOLN-FM.
j
WMCY*
is^jno longdr
af-filiated with
WQLN.-Rather,
ithas
developed
itself into acommunication tool forstudents.
J
WMCY has experienceddevelopmental changes dur-ing the past two years. In
1982,
the station relocated tothe basement of Baldwin
Hall.
Rennovations
totaling$14,000 allowed the depart-ment to consolidate Itselfunder one
roof.
Its been almost a year and ahalf now since WMCY has oc-cupied the premises ofBaldwin basement!
f
fRagan believes "we're mak-ing progress." Ragan toldThe
Merciad the?
news"department has been apositive addition to WMCY.Access to
the-Associated
Press adds national and Inter-national news to our localcampus news, Ragan added."The variety of
programm
ing is where the potential ofgrowth lies," Curcio
said.
WMCY provides its listenerswith hard rock, new wave, thetop 40, Laker football gamesand the Pittsburgh Pirates.The voice of Mercyhurst
College
is an alternative to
col-
ege radio.
\
:#w^
Video
room
changes
location
By Debbie
Hlson
-|.Last Sunday, the newly con-structed video roompremiered the first movie in
its j
new location.| It is nowlocated on the west
side
ofthe Back Porch Cafe.The video room had to berelocated
"from
its previoussite to accommodate thegraphic arts department.An agreement with Mer-cyhurst College PresidentWilliam P. Garvey and the
stu-
dent government was madelast year. Dr. Garvey allowedMSG to utilize the room for aone year trial basis. .
rSincer
a
videoroom*wasneeded,the commuter loungelocated in the Back PorchCafe, was designated as thenew location.
"The
administration hasbeen very helpful with all theproblems* and satisfying allour needs," Pat Songer, MSGpresident
said.
?
The video room will housethe large screen television.
"It
will be a secure place to keepthe equipment", said Maree-Lynn Cicon, director
offthe
Student Union.The
room
will hold 15-20people ,comfortably"
Clcon
stated.
^ * &
Some of the new items pur-chased last year for the roomwill be moved to the new loca-
tion.
These items' include asofa, a love seat, two largebean bags, and two small beanbags.
>»:•>»:
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I
|
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10% OFF to all Mercyhurst students
with
proper
ID
I
j£.TiresLube,
Oil
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Filter
College Students
Juniors, Seniors,
Grads
Apply for your own Fashion Bug Charge Cardnow... get a 10% discount coupon later.
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3018 State Street
455-6119 {
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ONELARGE CHEESEPIZZA WITH 2 ADDITICITEMS DELIVERED FREE TOYOUR DORM OR APARTMENT
s.
«&*
 
OCTOBER
26,1984
THE
MERCIADPAGE
3
Montgomery Room
Study
room
opert until
2:30
a.m
The Montgomery Room,located
at
the entrance
of the
library! is now open until 2:30
a.m.
to
accommodatestudents who need
a
room
to
study after the library closesat 11
p.m.
Two weeks
ago,
'BillPetrella,
an MSG
represen-
tative,
suggested the room re-main open for 24 hours.
Mercy
hurst College
Presi-
dent William
PJGarvey
actedon the
proposal
JHowever,
he
did
not
allowjthe
room
to re-
main open
for 24
i
hours
for
security reasons.
It
is
"not
wise"
for studentsto
be in
that area
of
the
col-
lege
at
that time
of
the morn-ing without adequate security,Garvey commented.
f
Wilbur Sydow, director
of
security, said security officeshave been instructed to fill outa report regarding any misuseof the room.During the past two weeks,acts of vandalism have not
oc-
curred
in
the room, accordingto Sydow.
i
However, misuse
of the
room
will
result with privilegesbeing revoked.There has not been an over-whelming demand
for
use
of
the room, Sydow
said.
%
In
1971,
the room was usedspecifically
as a
study area,Joan Cooper, director
of the
library
said.
Creativity
subject
I
j
of
last
I
ABC
meeting
By Shane Brown
-
i
"Disciplined creativity^
or
can creativity be
learned"
wasa question posed
to
the Mer-cyhurst chapter of the Interna-tional Association
of
Business Communicators lastWednesday at the Erie
HiltonS
Barbara Smith, senior vicepresident
off
BursonmarStellar, the largest public rela-tions firm
in the
United_States,demonstrated^ various
forms*
of^fcreativity
throughmany mediums.
JR
"Creativity
is
discipline andcan be improved and learned,"Smith
said.
Fear^of
rejection
is
the oneforce which prohibits studentsfrom exhibiting their creativi-ty, she added."Once
one has
overcomethis fear and his idea is heard,others may build
off it or
use
it.":Smith
commented.
"^
Reinforcement and building
on)
ideas
are two
importantfactors which shape one'screativity.Smith provided rules for thedisciplined creative process.She
said,
the problem must beidentified and establish somecriteria
to
the solution.
at
Creativity must be kept mov-
ing,
according
to
Smith. Onemust be
a
constant^ observerwilling
to
solve a problem.Smith was the first speakerto attend
an
IABC meeting.
Pam
Ekert, marketing directorat Erie
Cablevisiongjwill
highlight
the
November
5
meeting
at
8:15:p.m.
in
the
basement
of
Baldwin.
SHENANIGANS
This Friday and Saturday Rock With Kidder
Saturday come in costume for Halloween Specials:
Remember
|
Every Monday
-
Wings
$2.25* Tuesday
-
25* Drafts
I
Wednesday-Little
Kings
3 For
*1
Gourmet Cooking
Classesi
Interna tiona
I
Cuisine
Chef Michael, LTD.
is now
acceptingapplications
for
intermediate
and
advanced classes
to be
offered
in
November, December and Janaury.
Call 455-6851
or
725-5442
for
details.
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Erie,
Pa.
16502
Phone 459-8109
WHERE
BEER
WILL NEVER
BE.
Jim
Markiewicz
(left) and Fr.
Chuck
Schmitt (right), in a scene from"No Exit."
J B
"i '•
»
3
Jr
"No Exit" makesgrand entrance
!
By
Laura Ruby
fa
|
Opening October
26th |
atMercyhurst College's LittleTheatre
is
Jean-Paul
Sartre's
"No
Exit." Starring
in
the per-
formance
are Jim Markiewiczand Father Chuck Schmitt
of
campusministry.
|§"No-£ Exit'f
is a
modernmorality play whose threemain characters are contem-porary human beings
con-
demned to
a
new and different
kind
of
hell.
1
Schmitt,
who
portraysJoseph Garsan, tone
of the
condemned humans, said
the
play
r
is Sartre's version
of
"hell and how we getfthere."Schmitt
also "Stated
that
it is
"more common
in
Europe
for
philosophers
to use the
theatre for ideas."
I
Schmitt talked about Sartreand
the
fact that
he
was
an
existentialist.Existentialism
Is
centeredupon
jthe
analysis
of ex-
istence
and of the way man
finds himself existing
in the
world.
Existentialism stressesthe
freedom
and responsibilityof the individual.
?
Schmitt said the play dealswith the fact that "We makeour own
hell.
We have
a
fear oflosing contact with the earthand
a
fear that
our
place
in
history will
be
what
it
shouldbe instead
of
what we want
it
to be." The climax
of
the playarises when
the
humansdiscover each other
and the
way
in
which their sins are
to
be punished.
f
^ilThe
performance, translated
from*French by5Igor
Stalsky,was directed and staged
by
Lucian
Zabrammy
and
basedon Sartre's original work,"Behind Closed Doors
"
Open-ing night is 8 p.m. on the 26thof
October,
pother
perfor-mances
are
October
27,
November 1,2, and 3, at 8 p.m.and October 28th
at
2:30.
For
reservations
and ticket infor-mation call 825-0255.
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