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Letter From a Freedman to Old Master

Letter From a Freedman to Old Master

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Published by Brenda Sain
Students read this primary source document that was written by a formal slave to his previous master and answer the questions that follow. Good for American history discussion.
Students read this primary source document that was written by a formal slave to his previous master and answer the questions that follow. Good for American history discussion.

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Published by: Brenda Sain on May 31, 2011
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05/31/2011

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Letter from a Freedman to His Old Master 
 The following is a primary source document. It was dictated by the old servant, andcontains his ideas and forms of expression.Cincinnati Commercial.Dayton, Ohio, August 7, 1865. 
To my Old Master, Col. P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee.
 SIR: I got your letter and was glad to find that you hadnot forgotten Jordan, and that you wanted me to come back andlive with you again, promising to do better for me than anybodyelse can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought theYankees would have hung you long before this for harboring Rebs.they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about yourgoing to Col. Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was leftby his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twicebefore I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt,and am glad you are still living. I would do me good to go backto the dear old home again and see Miss Mary and Miss Marthaand Alien, Esther, Green and Lee. Give my love to them all, andtell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not inthis. I would have gone back to see you all when I was workingin the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbor told me Henryintended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.I want to know particularly what the good chance is youpropose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here; I get $25 amonth, with victuals and clothing: have a comfortable home forMandy (the folks here call her Mrs. Anderson). and the children,Milly Jane and Grundy, go to school and are learning well; theteacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go toSunday-School, and Mandy and me attend church...As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there isnothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free-papers in1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department atNashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back withoutsome proof that you are sincerely disposed to treat us justlyand kindly-and we have concluded to test you sincerity by askingyou to send us our wages for the time we served you. This willmake us forget and forgive old sores, and rely on your justiceand friendship n the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-
(c) Brenda Sain 2011, American History

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