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Stephen King's The Wind Through the Keyhole: A Dark Tower Novel (excerpt)

Stephen King's The Wind Through the Keyhole: A Dark Tower Novel (excerpt)

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4.06

(234)
|Views: 35,087|Likes:
Published by Simon and Schuster
In The Wind Through the Keyhole, Stephen King returns to the rich landscape of Mid-World, the spectacular territory of the Dark Tower fantasy saga that stands as his most beguiling achievement.

Roland Deschain and his ka-tet—Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy, the billy-bumbler—encounter a ferocious storm just after crossing the River Whye on their way to the Outer Baronies. As they shelter from the howling gale, Roland tells his friends not just one strange story but two . . . and in so doing, casts new light on his own troubled past.
In The Wind Through the Keyhole, Stephen King returns to the rich landscape of Mid-World, the spectacular territory of the Dark Tower fantasy saga that stands as his most beguiling achievement.

Roland Deschain and his ka-tet—Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy, the billy-bumbler—encounter a ferocious storm just after crossing the River Whye on their way to the Outer Baronies. As they shelter from the howling gale, Roland tells his friends not just one strange story but two . . . and in so doing, casts new light on his own troubled past.

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Publish date: Apr 24, 2012
Added to Scribd: Mar 29, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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12/13/2013

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“Pitch perect...[it] works beautiully...Even those who are not a-miliar with the series will fnd the conclusion both moving andsatisying.” –
publishers weekly
, Starred Review  “I have always ound Rolands ormative years the most compelling,and this takes us back to the year ollowing his mother’s death…Testory reads like a genre mash-up o horror/western/detective fction,in which our hero rides into town to wade through gore, solve amystery, and bring justice to an unruly rontier town. Te experience will urther steel him or the man he will become, the stone-acedgunslinger who makes bullets dance rom six-shooters with sandal- wood grips…I elt enchanted…[King] still tells stories better thananyone.” –
benjamin percy, esQuire
“Tis is King at his most beguiling and most literarily distin-guished.” –
booklist
, Starred Review 
Early praise or
Te Wind Trough the Keyhole 
 
 Te Wind Trough the Keyhole
A Dark ower Novel
Stephen King
In
Te Wind Trough the Keyhole 
, Stephen King returns to the richlandscape o Mid-World, the spectacular territory o the Dark owerantasy saga that stands as his most beguiling achievement.Roland Deschain and his ka-tet—Jake, Susannah, Eddie, and Oy,the billy-bumbler—encounter a erocious storm just ater crossingthe River Whye on their way to the Outer Baronies. As they shelterrom the howling gale, Roland tells his riends not just one strangestory but two . . . and in so doing, casts new light on his own troubledpast.In his early days as a gunslinger, in the guilt-ridden year ollowinghis mother’s death, Roland is sent by his ather to investigate evi-dence o a murderous shape-shiter, a “skin-man” preying upon thepopulation around Debaria. Roland takes charge o Bill Streeter,the brave but terrifed boy who is the sole surviving witness to thebeast’s most recent slaughter. Only a teenager himsel, Roland calmsthe boy and prepares him or the ollowing days trials by reciting astory rom the Magic ales o the Eld that his mother oten read tohim at bedtime. “A person’s never too old or stories,” Roland says toBill. “Man and boy, girl and woman, never too old. We live or them.”And indeed, the tale that Roland unolds, the legend o im Stout-heart, is a timeless treasure or all ages, a story that lives or us.King began the Dark ower series in 1974; it gained momentum inthe 1980s; and he brought it to a thrilling conclusion when the lastthree novels were published in 2003 and 2004.
Te Wind Trough the Keyhole 
is sure to ascinate avid ans o the Dark ower epic. But thisnovel also stands on its own or all readers, an enchanting and haunt-ing journey to Rolands world and testimony to the power o StephenKing’s storytelling magic.

Activity (56)

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debbiebspinner reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Loved it. So good to be back in Mid-World, with beloved characters and the 'voice' that makes the words come alive.
erickibler reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Merely good. It would be wrong to say I expected more, since Stephen King often delivers books that, although they tell a story well, fall short of the suspense and emotional resonance of his best books.

Fans of the Dark Tower series take note: this is not an essential part of the main story. This book picks up in the middle of the saga, after book four. While holed up to wait out a storm, Roland tells his crew a pair of stories, one nested inside the other. One is an adventure from Roland's youth. The other is more of a fairy tale, but one that impacts the lore of the Gunslingers.

If you've never read the Dark Tower books, don't start with this one. Don't even think you need to read it, because you don't. But if you're already a fan of the books, check it out, but with lowered expectations. Have a visit with your old ka-tet: Roland, Eddie, Susannah, and Jack. Sit around the campfire. Have yourself a gunslinger burrito and enjoy some storytelling.
srboone reviewed this
Rated 5/5
The 8th Dark Tower book takes place between #4 and #5. While it doesn't add much to the Dark Tower storyline other than getting Roland's ka-tet from point A to point B, it is nonetheless an enthralling and scary story that adds color and depth to the mythology. It is also vastly superior to the other Dark Tower book told in flashback ,Wizard and Glass. King acknowledges this by having Roland admit that he wasn't very good at telling stories in the beginning, but he's gotten better.
hoosgracie reviewed this
Rated 5/5
The audio is read by Stephen King, and he is actually a really good narrator. I felt like I was sitting around a campfire while Uncle Stevie told a story. As to the story, it takes place between books 4 & 5 of the Dark Tower and it works well since the Ka-Tet is holed up out of a storm and Roand tells them two intertwined stories while they wait it out.
drakevaughn_1 reviewed this
Rated 2/5
Stephen King has been on a roll recently (particularly with the awesome 11/22/63), but The Wind Through the Keyhole is an exception. Unlike the previous gunslinger novels, the main characters are completely absent from the plot, except as storytellers for the tale-within-a-tale. But missing our favorite friends aside, the story itself was a drag. And just as the dull tale kept meandering around, another story was shoved right inside that one. Just way too much storytelling and not enough action to keep me captivated. The end did pick up a little, but by that point I just wanted it to end quickly. Sorry, but this attempt to revitalize the gunslinger series was a swing and a miss.
rivkat_2 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Dark Tower novel set (kind of) in an interlude as the main protagonists continue towards the Tower, but that’s really a wrapper for the story within the story within the story. The one in the very center is about a young boy at the edge of a dark forest whose father dies and whose new stepfather is not very nice, nor is the tax collector who sends the boy on a hunt for the famed Maerlyn. The middle is about an adventure from Roland’s youth in which he comforts a traumatized boy who’s seen a shapeshifter kill his family by telling him about that other young boy. And the frame story is about Roland and his ka-tet hiding from the starkblast, a cold storm that freezes so fast that trees explode. It didn’t seem very memorable to me, but it was definitely King.
janejetson223_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Ok, I absolutely loved the Dark Tower series. I thought as each book came out they got better and better. For this book however, I did not have high hopes. Where could SK go from that super high point the series ended on? I should never have doubted! This book was wonderful - I read it as close to straight through as I can these days and I loved the story in a story in a story approach! If you have not read any of the other books in the Dark Tower series, fear not, you will still enjoy The Wind Through the Keyhole. (Make sure you read the forward to get "up to speed".)
totallyrandomman_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Fantastic read. It is a tale within a tale within a tale, and it breathes life not just into Roland and his quest, but into the very folks of Mid-World. Dark yet vibrant, it is a tale of the magic and bravery of the human spirit in the face of the unknown. It doesn't really fill in any missing pieces of the original series, and in fact revolves very little around the ka-tet, taking place instead inside one of Roland's tales, told to his ka-mates in the shadow of a deadly storm they must wait out. 'The Wind Through The Keyhole' reads very much like a brief detour on the road to the tower, But I found it to be a detour well worth taking... one filled with wonder, fear, and ultimately, hope.
jarratt_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
As usual, King delivers. "The Wind through the Keyhole" is kinda like the movie "Inception" in that it's a story within a story within a story. What makes it all the more fun is that Roland himself tells the interior story in first person.According to King, this book takes place between "Wizard and Glass" and "Wolves of the Calla." If you've not read any of The Dark Tower series, you could get by with this book fine enough. But I'd strongly encourage you to read the whole of the series--with this in its proper spot--as it's fantastic.This story sees Roland and his ka-tet stranded in a massive icy windstorm--a "starkblast." To pass the time, Roland tells Eddie, Jake, and Susannah about his younger days when he and a companion were sent off on their first mission--to rid a nearby town of a skin-man. During this tale, young Roland tells the story of "The Wind through the Keyhole" to another character.I read many authors, but I cannot think of one who's got such a distinctive voice as King, especially when he's writing Dark Tower stories. The imagination is off the charts, the characters full, and the pacing perfect.The only potential problem with reading "The Wind through the Keyhole" is that it'll make you want to go back and read the whole of the series again--quite a massive undertaking. But I'll probably fall under its spell again soon. You kin?
daniel5estes reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Stephen King's magnum opus, the Dark Tower series, officially concluded in 2004 with the eponymously titled 7th volume. And then beginning in 2007, the world of Roland Deschain found new life in a popular comic book prequel series. And now talks of both movie and TV adaptations have gone from rumor to (nearly) a reality. (As I write this, the project hasn't officially been green-lit but the producers hope to start shooting next year.) Since the stories of Mid-World are alive and continually evolving, I was delighted to learn that King had written another volume for the series, The Wind Through the Keyhole.The timeline for this one takes place between books #4 (Wizard and Glass) and #5 (Wolves of the Calla), and fans should be pleased how it adds to the tale of Roland and his Ka-Tet while maintaining the consistency of the later novels. The story meanders some in the middle, and King's Mid-World jargon can get a little distracting at times, but overall this is a fine addition to the saga.

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