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bundling 02-06-28

bundling 02-06-28

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Published by Core Research

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Published by: Core Research on Jan 09, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/09/2014

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28th June, 2002
Potential Anti-Competitive Effects of
Bundling
A Report on behalf of Hutchison Telecommunications
Joshua Gans and Stephen King

The analysis here represents the views of CoRE Research Pty Ltd (ACN 096 869 760) and should not be construed as those of Hutchison Telecommunications.

Contents
Page
June, 2002
i
1
Background................................................. 2
2
What is Bundling?........................................ 3
3
Socially Efficient Bundling........................... 5
4
Competitive Consequences.......................... 7
4.1
Bundling for Price Discrimination.................... 7
4.2
Bundling as an Entry Barrier.......................... 8
5
Conclusions............................................... 12
6
References................................................ 13
Section1
Background
2
1
Background

Concern about the potential anti-competitive effects of bundled products has arisen in regulatory contexts around the world.1The best known example involves the anti-trust litigation against Microsoft for the bundling of its Internet Explorer web browser with its Windows 98 (and beyond) operating system. However, concerns about bundling have also been raised in the telecommunications industry in Australia and the United States (e.g. King and Maddock 1999), regarding telecommunications and internet service provision in Canada (e.g. Telecom decision CRTC 98-4) and in the provision of cable services in the UK (e.g. Joint OFTEL and ITC document, \u201cThe bundling of telephony and television\u201d, February 2000). Recently, the potential anti-competitive effects of bundling have been raised in the context of the proposed arrangement between Foxtel, Optus and Telstra relating to cable-TV services in Australia.

Bundling can have ambiguous economic consequences. Bundling may be desirable. For example, it may allow more efficient production and distribution of products and may save transactions costs associated with a consumer purchasing a variety of unbundled products. At the same time, bundling might provide a way for a firm with market power to extend that power by either harming potential competitors or raising barriers to entry.

Given the ongoing concerns about bundling, this paper is intended to provide a brief introduction to the economics of bundled products. The paper surveys the relevant economic literature and considers the benefits from bundling as well as how bundling might be used as a means of price discrimination, as a facilitating device to soften competition within existing markets and, finally, as a potential barrier to entry. We note that, in each of these cases, the potential anti- competitive effects of bundling are at their strongest when a firm has significant market power over one component in a bundle. In this situation, an appropriate regulatory response is not necessarily to prohibit bundling. Rather regulation can be designed to either remove the ability to abuse bundling by mandatory unbundling or to encourage access to components in a way that would enable equivalent bundles to be provided by non-integrated firms.

1 For example, telecommunications and computer software in the United States,

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