The Atlantic

How the Political Press Favors the Rich and Famous

The media should stop working so hard to make things so easy for anyone with the last name Bush, Clinton, and inevitably, Trump.
Source: Jeff Mitchell / Reuters

Whether one likes or dislikes Chelsea Clinton is beside the point.

Imagine paging through an official handbook at The New York Times or NPR or Columbia University’s journalism school and encountering an entry with these guidelines:

Prospective political candidates: A subject may sometimes warrant coverage as a possible or likely political candidate before he or she officially declares an intention to seek office or files paperwork to formally initiate a run. Such coverage should be reserved for the unusually rich, the widely famous, or the close relative of a person widely known

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