The Christian Science Monitor

Military space race? Why some say now's the time for an upgraded treaty.

“I have to say,” said President Trump in an April video call with astronauts aboard the International Space Station that was broadcast to schoolchildren nationwide, “there’s tremendous military application in space.”

The United States has long worked on that assumption, to the extent that much of its military prowess now depends upon a vast network of satellites orbiting the planet.

Other nations have come to understand that dependence – both Russia and China have reportedly tested anti-satellite missiles in recent years – which in turn has led to a growing clamor from politicians and influential thinkers for the US to improve its satellite warfare capabilities.

Most recently, the rapid development of North Korea’s intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) program has boosted calls for all kinds of missile defenses – including those based in outer space.

Yet there is another side to the

US still seen as dominantSeparate Space Corps?Norms of conduct

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor3 min readPolitics
Monday Sunrise Briefs: Hong Kong and Portland protests, Venezuela
Here are three news events this weekend: A big, peaceful protest in Hong Kong, secret talks about Venezuela, and an alt-right rally in Portland.
The Christian Science Monitor1 min readSociety
One Woman’s Quest: Use Art To Bring Focus To Marriage
The beautiful designs of Nushmia Khan’s nikahnamas – Islamic marriage contracts – help draw attention to each partner’s rights and responsibilities.
The Christian Science Monitor3 min readScience
Chesapeake Bay Water Quality Is Improving After Years Of Work
Cities and towns in the Chesapeake Bay watershed have long struggled with pollutants. Thanks to new EPA regulations, water quality improved last year.