Los Angeles Times

Battles erupt over warehouse jobs as the Legislature moves to curb subsidies

Hundreds of residents packed a church hall in San Bernardino a few weeks ago to hear community leaders rail against a huge new logistics center planned for the town's airport.

The $200-million air cargo facility, the size of 11 football fields, could eventually generate some 3,800 jobs, garnering $6.5 million a year in revenue for the publicly owned airport on the site of the long-shuttered Norton Air Force base. But what kind of jobs, residents wanted to know: Low-paid part-time jobs with no benefits? Jobs likely to be replaced by robots?

What about the pollution from 1,568 diesel-fueled truck trips a day and 26 daily cargo plane flights, which would blanket low-income neighborhoods already choked with toxic fumes?

And, by the way, why won't officials reveal the name of the employer, rumored to be Amazon.com?

A spectacular boom in warehouses and distribution centers moving in over the past decade helped lift the vast Inland Empire region out of the Great Recession, bringing an estimated 84,000 jobs, nearly a quarter of the region's added employment. Amazon built 14 giant fulfillment centers in Riverside and San Bernardino counties, becoming the area's largest employer.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times5 min read
Newsom Pledged To Fix California Water Politics. Now He's Bogged Down In The Delta
LOS ANGELES - Soon after taking office last year, Gov. Gavin Newsom pledged to break through the "status quo" of California water politics, plagued by decades of litigation and impasse. "We have to get past the old binaries, like farmers versus envir
Los Angeles Times6 min read
In A Small Field, Men Reenact An Oft-overlooked War That Remade The US, Mexico And The Border
LOS ANGELES - The insult cut through the air about a minute past high noon on a grassy field where the Mexican and United States soldiers faced off. "Go back to Boston, gringo!" bellowed Santiago Lobo, a Mexican militiaman and rancher. Lobo's verbal
Los Angeles Times3 min read
Sam Mendes Wins DGA Honor For '1917,' Cementing Its Oscar Front-runner Status
LOS ANGELES- Filmmaker Sam Mendes won the top prize at the Directors Guild Awards Saturday night for "1917," moving his celebrated movie one step closer to winning the Oscar for best picture. The DGA win, coupled with the war movie's victory last Sat