TIME

The myths about the Mueller report that just won’t die

The investigation ended on March 22 when Mueller submitted his report

WHEN WE TESTIFIED BEFORE THE HOUSE JUDICIARY Committee in June regarding lessons from former special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, it became apparent from the questioning that misconceptions about Mueller’s findings still exist. The narrative was shaped by Attorney General William Barr, who issued his description of Mueller’s conclusions more than three weeks before the public saw the full 448-page report. In a letter to Barr, Mueller complained that Barr’s summary “did not fully capture the context, nature and substance” of his team’s work and created “public confusion.” Mueller will testify before Congress on July 17. In the meantime, here is our effort to dispel some of the most persistent myths.

MYTH: Mueller found “no collusion.”

RESPONSE: Mueller spent almost 200 pages describing “numerous links between the Russian government and the Trump Campaign.” He found

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