Los Angeles Times

Commentary: What sex-trafficking defendants look like now

The new faces of sex trafficking are increasingly white, affluent and well-connected. In an indictment unveiled July 8 in the Southern District of New York, Jeffrey Epstein, the wealthy hedge fund manager, was charged with sex trafficking for recruiting numerous minors for paid sex acts. In 2018, a federal judge ruled that Harvey Weinstein, the film producer, could be sued under the federal sex-trafficking law for allegedly coercing a woman to engage in sex in exchange for promises of job advancement.

This shift is an important development, as anti-trafficking efforts have long

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