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No Beast So Fierce: The Terrifying True Story of the Champawat Tiger, the Deadliest Animal in History

No Beast So Fierce: The Terrifying True Story of the Champawat Tiger, the Deadliest Animal in History

Written by Dane Huckelbridge

Narrated by Corey Snow


No Beast So Fierce: The Terrifying True Story of the Champawat Tiger, the Deadliest Animal in History

Written by Dane Huckelbridge

Narrated by Corey Snow

ratings:
4.5/5 (20 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 5, 2019
ISBN:
9780062898418
Format:
Audiobook

Description

American Sniper meets Jaws in this gripping, true account of the deadliest animal of all time, the Champawat Tiger — responsible for killing more than 400 humans in Northern India and Nepal in the first decade of the 20th century — and the legendary hunter who finally brought it down.

At the turn of the 20th century, in the forested foothills of the Himalayas between India and Nepal, a large Bengal tiger began preying on humans. Between roughly 1900 and 1907, the fearsome beast locals called the Champawat Man-Eater claimed 436 lives. Successfully evading both hunters and soldiers from the Nepalese army and growing bolder with its kills, the tiger — commonly a nocturnal predator — prowled settlements and roadways even in broad daylight. Entire villages were virtually abandoned.

Desperate for help, authorities appealed to Jim Corbett, a then-unknown railroad employee of humble origins who had grown up hunting and tracking game through the hills of Kumaon. Like a police detective on the trail of a human killer, Corbett questioned villagers who had encountered the tiger and began tracking its movements in the dense, hilly woodlands — while the animal began to hunt Corbett in return. When the big cat attacked a teenager and dragged her away, he followed the blood trail deep into the forest — a harrowing, dramatic chase that would ultimately end the man-eater’s long reign of terror and turn the young Corbett into a living legend.

In this rip-roaring adventure and compelling natural history, Dane Huckelbridge recreates one of the great adventure stories of the 20th century, bringing into focus a principled, disciplined soldier, hunter, and conservationist — who would later earn fame for his devotion to saving the Bengal tiger and its habitat — and the beautiful, terrifying animal he patiently pursued. Written with the thrilling immediacy of John Vaillant’s The Tiger, Susan Casey’s The Devil’s Teeth, and Nate Blakeslee’s American Wolf, No Beast so Fierce is an enthralling depiction of a classic battle between man and animal, human encroachment and wild nature that resonates today.

Publisher:
Released:
Feb 5, 2019
ISBN:
9780062898418
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Dane Huckelbridge has written for the Wall Street Journal, Tin House, The New Republic, and New Delta Review. He is the author of Bourbon: A History of the American Spirit; The United States of Beer: The True Tale of How Beer Conquered America, From B.C. to Budweiser and Beyond; and a novel, Castle of Water, which has been optioned for film. A graduate of Princeton University, he lives in Paris.


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What people think about No Beast So Fierce

4.3
20 ratings / 9 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Amazing. Learned so much about Nepal, colonial history, tigers, natives, royal hunts. Message is about eroding habitats and the pressure that puts on critical balance of nature. Old story, contemporary and historical lesson. Highly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    One tiger, 436 kills at the turn of the 20th century. The premise had me hooked, but the author got caught up in all of his research and the incredible real events get lost in an onslaught of historical detail about colonialism. There are some thrilling passages and it was all interesting, but a book with this subject matter shouldn’t be as boring as it often was.
  • (4/5)
    A very interesting story of a man eating tiger. One small complaint would be that the author guesses a little too much about what Jim Corbett must be thinking. Also, while the description of the political situation in Nelpal and Indian is interesting, the author tells us too often that the man eaters are created by the British Colonial policies. The first time he tell us, it is fascinating, the 4th, I did want to say I got it the first few times! Overall though, an engrossing story about tigers, India, and Jim Corbett, a tiger conservationist who originally became known as a hunter of man eaters.
  • (4/5)
    I only know a slight bit of information about the Champawat Tiger. Therefore, I found this book to be very interesting to learn about animals from other countries. To be honest, when I think of "deadly" animals; the Champawat Tiger is not one that makes the top ten list. However, after reading this book it is right up in the top animals of the world. This is no joke as the Champawat Tiger held four hundred and thirty six kills before Jim Corbett killed him. Although, reading this book, I can imagine in those moments when Jim killed the Champawat Tiger that it was with some remorse and respect for the beast. Mr. Huckelbridge writes as a good storyteller. He provided plenty of details without allowing the book to be bogged down with details. Also, it felt as if I was transported back in time and stepped into Jim's shoes as he hunted the Champawat Tiger. Anyone who likes to read nonfiction books, should pick up a copy of this book.
  • (4/5)
    The true story of a Bengal tiger that killed over 400 people in Nepal and India a little over 100 years ago. I had no idea of how efficient a killing machine tigers are and how many people they have killed over the years. One instant you are standing at the edge of the woods and the next the tiger is already sprinting away with another victim in its mouth. Chilling. All set within the backdrop of the Indian subcontinent and the changes over the years leading to more human deaths. Nonfiction fans will eat this one up. Sorry for the bad pun...
  • (5/5)
    So interesting and it’s amazing I didn’t know about this particular animal. They have to make a movie about this. Puts all other man eating animals to shame.
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful narrative and well read.
    Tigers have always fascinated me, but to realize how their natural instincts attributed to all those deaths, is scary.
  • (5/5)
    This one fullfilled exactly what I expected and wanted from everything I could find in researching the book. What I hoped for and got was some sense of adventure, a little bit of learning about at least one or two of the native peoples of India and their history, and some basic understanding of British rule in India during the 19th and 20th centuries.

    What I didn’t expect and enjoyed thoroughly as well, is an understanding of the impact of empire and technology on tigers and their habitat and success or lack of that in the modern day.

    Some readers may find this one a bit to “geeked out“ but for me it was fascinating. There was also no shortage of suspense and adventure in following the life of the tiger and in the end the death which was Uplifting for the simple farming communities in the region.

    In the audio version The narration starts out a bit over enthusiastic for me but don’t worry it’s settles down after a while to a nice rhythm.
  • (1/5)
    Interesting story but read garbage audio book and bad writing