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From the Publisher

Inspired by internet video shorts and the YouTube revolution? Trying to break into the film industry? You can prove yourself by making a great short film at film school—if you can afford to go to film school; if you can't, then you're going to have to make your films without money. You're going to have to film on a microbudget—like Shane Meadows, who made Where's the Money, Ronnie? before This Is England, and Guy Ritchie, who made The Hard Case before Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels. With the technology available today, it's easier than ever to make a short film without the benefits of funding, but digital cameras and editing systems are only part of the story. The most important thing is the filmmaker. This guide gives all the information necessary to put together a short film production—from first idea to script to planning and casting to locations, shooting, editing, and distribution—along with a list of the 10 most common microbudget mistakes and how to avoid them.
Published: Oldcastle Books an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781842438763
List price: $10.49
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