From the Publisher

In his Napra Nautilus Award-winning novel Touching Spirit Bear, author Ben Mikaelson delivers a poignant coming-of-age story of a boy who must overcome the effects that violence has had on his life.

After severely injuring Peter Driscal in an empty parking lot, mischief-maker Cole Matthews is in major trouble. But instead of jail time, Cole is given another option: attend Circle Justice, an alternative program that sends juvenile offenders to a remote Alaskan Island to focus on changing their ways. Desperate to avoid prison, Cole fakes humility and agrees to go.

While there, Cole is mauled by a mysterious white bear and left for dead. Thoughts of his abusive parents, helpless Peter, and his own anger cause him to examine his actions and seek redemption—from the spirit bear that attacked him, from his victims, and from himself.

Topics: Native Americans, Alaska, First in a Series, Survival, Bears, Abuse, Adventurous, Violent, Wilderness, and Coming of Age

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062009685
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Touching Spirit Bear
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Mic
2 min read
Society

Man Who Created "White Lives Matter" Fliers Says He Considers Himself a Racist on Live TV

Some people are proud to let their racist flag fly. On Sunday, New York state resident Scott Lacy set the record straight with local affiliate WKBW and took responsibility for flyers distributed to Lewiston, New York, residents with the words "White Lives Matter" on them. The flyers also condemned illegal immigration and contained statistics claiming black people are more prone to crime than white people. "The purpose of these flyers is to raise awareness with whites about the plight our people face in this country," Lacy told WKBW. Lacy says all of the information is factual.  "There was crim
A Plus
5 min read

Chicago’s Most Vulnerable Citizens Have A Voice Thanks To One Artist’s Embrace Of Art As Activism

Gang violence. Increased danger. Murder. These are just a few of the dark words that are currently so closely associated with Chicago. To say it's not true is a lie. If you're not living it, you're hearing stories or seeing it on the news — there's no way to block it out. Stories of innocent children killed in the line of gang fire, intended murder, and fatality numbers going up each weekend. This is the harsh reality. This, partnered with the racism and inequality that seems to be increasing across America, is reflecting hard on the diversity of Chicagoans. With a new administration creating
TIME
1 min read
Society

Nayib Bukele

Ioan Grillo In a barrio of San Salvador, Mayor Nayib Bukele stands on a renovated soccer pitch defending penalty kicks from a line of kids. Most are approaching the age when many local youths join feared street gangs, known here as maras. But Bukele is encouraging them to shoot balls instead of bullets. “We’re trying to challenge the gangs, not by repression but by competing to get the young people to our side,” says Bukele, 35. In 2015, the year Bukele came to power, El Salvador’s capital city suffered 514 homicides in an area with about 260,000 people, making it 11 times more lethal per he