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Editor’s Note

“Raunchy, juicy, sweaty & delicious...”

Bourdain’s raunchy, juicy, sweaty, and — yes — delicious follow-up to Kitchen Confidential is full of hilarious personal anecdotes, along with a dash of invaluable life lessons, like never touch the hollandaise at a buffet.
Niree N.
Scribd Editor

The long-awaited follow-up to the megabestseller Kitchen Confidential

In the ten years since his classic Kitchen Confidential first alerted us to the idiosyncrasies and lurking perils of eating out, from Monday fish to the breadbasket conspiracy, much has changed for the subculture of chefs and cooks, for the restaurant business—and for Anthony Bourdain.

Medium Raw explores these changes, moving back and forth from the author's bad old days to the present. Tracking his own strange and unexpected voyage from journeyman cook to globe-traveling professional eater and drinker, and even to fatherhood, Bourdain takes no prisoners as he dissects what he's seen, pausing along the way for a series of confessions, rants, investigations, and interrogations of some of the most controversial figures in food.

Beginning with a secret and highly illegal after-hours gathering of powerful chefs that he compares to a mafia summit, Bourdain pulls back the curtain—but never pulls his punches—on the modern gastronomical revolution, as only he can. Cutting right to the bone, Bourdain sets his sights on some of the biggest names in the foodie world, including David Chang, the young superstar chef who has radicalized the fine-dining landscape; the revered Alice Waters, whom he treats with unapologetic frankness; the Top Chef winners and losers; and many more.

And always he returns to the question "Why cook?" Or the more difficult "Why cook well?" Medium Raw is the deliciously funny and shockingly delectable journey to those answers, sure to delight philistines and gourmands alike.

Topics: Essays, Food History, and Irreverent

Published: HarperCollins on Jun 8, 2010
ISBN: 9780061998065
List price: $11.88
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Clear rating

If you know Bourdain...

if you GET Bourdain...

this book is a must.

And if you don't know him OR get him? You should. This book is still a must. Beautiful in that typical tarnished, rough-around-the-edges, not easy to digest -- yet bitingly accurate -- Bourdain way.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"How long that sort of douche-oriented economy survives is questionable."

Not my favorite of Bourdain's books. He's really mastered this weird little game he plays where he starts off by savaging one celebrity chef or another and then backtracks utterly, excusing all the things he just hated on and concluding that they're not so bad after all.

What fun is that?

Bourdain at his best has something worthwhile to say about the importance of food and the value of embracing different cultures through eating with them. But maybe just watch a few episodes of No Reservations instead of this.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Bourdain has a real literary style and voice that is uniquely his. There are few writers out there that are identifiable in a random sentence or paragraph. I just love Bourdain's writing and rhythms and riffs. He is funny, witty, learned, and insightful. More importantly he isn't scared of examining the contradictions inherent in people, food, and life. But most importantly, what shines through most is Bourdain's passion, heart and honesty; not only about the food he eats and the restaurants and chefs he writes about, but about himself. As Bourdain might put it himself, he really gives a shit about what he writes. And I still want him to write a new novel -- maybe "The Further Adventures of the Sauté Bitch"?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

If you know Bourdain...

if you GET Bourdain...

this book is a must.

And if you don't know him OR get him? You should. This book is still a must. Beautiful in that typical tarnished, rough-around-the-edges, not easy to digest -- yet bitingly accurate -- Bourdain way.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
"How long that sort of douche-oriented economy survives is questionable."

Not my favorite of Bourdain's books. He's really mastered this weird little game he plays where he starts off by savaging one celebrity chef or another and then backtracks utterly, excusing all the things he just hated on and concluding that they're not so bad after all.

What fun is that?

Bourdain at his best has something worthwhile to say about the importance of food and the value of embracing different cultures through eating with them. But maybe just watch a few episodes of No Reservations instead of this.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Bourdain has a real literary style and voice that is uniquely his. There are few writers out there that are identifiable in a random sentence or paragraph. I just love Bourdain's writing and rhythms and riffs. He is funny, witty, learned, and insightful. More importantly he isn't scared of examining the contradictions inherent in people, food, and life. But most importantly, what shines through most is Bourdain's passion, heart and honesty; not only about the food he eats and the restaurants and chefs he writes about, but about himself. As Bourdain might put it himself, he really gives a shit about what he writes. And I still want him to write a new novel -- maybe "The Further Adventures of the Sauté Bitch"?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Love Anthony Bourdain, love his books, love his style. If you are into "celebrity" chefs, memoirs, or food, you must read this.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Anyone who read Bourdain's first book, Kitchen Confidential, and is looking for a sequel needs to look elsewhere. Anthony Bourdain has come a long way from the bitter, cynical, darkly humorous, coke-addicted chef in the first book. Now he's a bitter, cynical, darkly humorous food writer/tv star. The main difference between the two books is that Medium Raw, much like The Guinea Pig Diaries, seems to be as much a compilation of separate essays as one coherent book. That said, the essays are still entertaining. The main exception occurs when Bourdain hovers too long on personalities in the food business without sufficiently making the reader care. For the most part, though, he hits his mark. He's witty and often (for me at least) laugh out loud funny. For someone who enjoys Top Chef and felt horrified by Fast Food Nation, this is a great choice.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Anthony Bourdain's latest book is more of what you would expect from him-brash, opinionated pieces about the current state of food and the world of restaurants. The book reads like a collection of magazine pieces, I was surprised that these had not been printed previously. As such, the chapters are wildly uneven. Some, like "I'm Dancing" are self-important twaddle. Others, like "It's Not You, it's Me", are intelligent ruminations about fine dining. The best of them, "My Aim Is True", the story of the fish cutter at Le Bernadin, is a marvel. It is a piece of non-fiction that rivals anything written in the New Yorker. I was left wanting more of this kind of writing. Bourdain needs to turn his attention outward to the world of food and away from his own character of Anthony Bourdain, bad-ass chef. That is where his true talent lies.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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