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How scared can you get in only 30 seconds? Dare to find out with Half-Minute Horrors, a collection of deliciously terrifying short short tales and creepy illustrations by an exceptional selection of writers and illustrators, including bestselling talents Lemony Snicket, James Patterson, Neil Gaiman, R.L.Stine, Faye Kellerman, Holly Black, Melissa Marr, Margaret Atwood, Jon Scieszka, Brett Helquist, and many more. With royalties benefiting First Book, a not-for-profit organization that brings books to children in need, this is an anthology worth devouring. So grab a flashlight, set the timer, and get ready for instant chills!

Published: HarperCollins on Jul 12, 2011
ISBN: 9780062113535
List price: $4.99
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A collection of very short horror stories written by an assortment of popular offers.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Grades 3 and upTurn the lights off, get a flashlight, and check your bedroom for monsters, ghosts, ghouls, or axe murderes before settling down with these thirty-second scaaaaaaaaaaaary stories from some of your favorite authors.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you’re looking for a book to read aloud to your kids (or your classroom!) during Halloween time, this is the one to pick up. It includes various genres, such as short stories, haikus, comics, limericks, etc. Also, with monsters under the bed, possessed toys, alien parents, ghosts, and a handful of other things, Half-Minute Horrors pretty much covers all the bases for creepiness.The stories are short (I think the longest one was a little over 2 pages), yet incredibly entertaining. Yes, there are some that I didn’t like very much, but for the most part, I was chuckling my way through Half-Minute Horrors. If you read it to younger kids, there is a good chance some of these stories will scare them, so if you’re worried about giving your kid nightmares or something, be sure to look it over. However, I definitely recommend including this book in your Halloween celebrations.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lots of fun to read but can give you lots of goosebumps! There are many stories but about 1-2 pages per a story! A fun book to read if you love being scared!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Half-Minute Horrors is a collection of 72 very short and very scary poems written by many popular children's authors. Many of the poems have illustrations which enhance the experience for the reader. I enjoyed this book of poems, and so did my 10 year old son. These poems are scary, and some of the themes and content may be disturbing to younger children. Before I read any of these poems to a classroom, I would have parents look at them first. The book contains several poems I feel would be appropriate to share in the classroom, with parents OK first. Extension Activity: Lanterne Poem1. Introduce children to lanterne poems, in which five lines form the shape of a Japanese lantern. Share an example, and let children recite it with you and clap out the syllables in each line. 2. Revisit each line and count the syllables together (in order, 1,2,3,4, & 1) Provide children with a simple line-byline patter to follow: 1 syllable2 syllables3 syllables4 syllables1 syllable3. Invite children to use the pattern to create a new lanterne poem. You might suggest they choose another animal. Have them offer ideas for what the animal might be doing. List children's ideas on chart paper. Then invite them to see which words fit the pattern. (You might circle those that do to eliminate confusion.) Children might suggest: The fat fox is running around the red barn.I found this activity in the book: Literacy-Building Transitioin Activities Written by: Ellen Booth Church (Scholastic)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Short horror stories, some of which made me feel scared. This is not necessarily a hard thing.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Billed as a "collection of instant frights from the world's most astonishing authors and artists," Half-Minute Horrors lives up to its title by presenting super-short sudden fiction to middle grade readers who like a little creepiness. Just a little, not too much. A set-up, some sort of mystery, and an unsettling cliffhanger of an ending are the norm here, almost all of them short enough to read in the promised half a minute.And when I say a little creepiness that doesn't mean they can't be somewhat disturbing. There are implications of cannibalism, creatures laying in wait to swallow you whole, disembodied hands that come calling while you sleep... but all stopped right at the moment of impact so that the reader can quickly turn the page if necessary. Because the engagement is so short there isn't enough time to plant too strong a mental picture to disturb. Yeah, if you think about some of these stories long enough they can really delve into truly terrifying territory, but the reader interested in horror is going to feel cheated if the author or the story pulls its punch too much or too quickly. Many of these stories plant their final, fatal twist in the last line for maximum impact so that even the seemingly odd story suddenly can turn on a dime.There are also some illustrated stories - I hesitate to call them comics, but some do take that format - which perform the graphic equivilent of their narrative counterparts. Perhaps only "Worms" by Lane Smith, a visually retelling of the gory old rhyme "The worms go in, the worms go out..." goes the furthest with its graphic depiction of life pre- and post-humus. Still, all good creepy fun.One of the things this book reminded me of was a series of books I had as a boy called "One Minute Mysteries" which would set the reader up with a drawing room situation and some details that would allow a reader to guess what had happened. Only I could never guess correctly and instead of enjoying the mystery I found the books frustrating because they made me feel stupid. I suppose the idea of a minute mystery was meant for boys like me who (at the time) were struggling with reading, but that book sent me the wrong direction. Perhaps the lack of character and emotion was the problem, but I never really got into the mystery genre as a result.There's no similar problem here with Half-Minute Horrors because the stories clearly spell out the (pending) doom, leaving the reader to invest as much emotion as their own fears permit. The various authors are all top-notch – M.T. Anderson, Adam Rex, Sarah Weeks, Holly Black, Jack Gantos, Jon Scieszka, Avi, and Lauren Myracle to name but a scant few –and include some generally regarded as adult writers, like Margaret Atwood and Jonathan Lethem, delivering on a wide variety of themes.I realize this comes too late to incorporate into Halloween lesson plans, but I would hope that the audience for this kind of thing sees this as more of an evergreen title. I think for the reluctant reader the ability to whiz through dozens of stories at one sitting will make the book feel much shorter than its 130 pages, and for other readers the shortness of these stories can serve as a sort of palate cleanser between much larger books, a sampler platter of ghoulish delights.Yuk, did I just write that last semi-blurb-worthy sentence?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An anthology of very short (one or two page), sort-of scary stories by an assortment of authors and illustrators. Jon Klassen's Legend story/art was particularly hilarious.Contents include: Something you ought to know / Lemony Snicket -- The chicken or the egg / Jerry Spinelli -- In hiding / Kenneth Oppel -- The old man in the picture / Richard Sala -- The babysitter / Erin Hunter -- Grand entrance / James Patterson -- Halloween mask / Sonya Sones -- Tenton / Tom Genrich & Michele Perry -- Nanny / Angela Johnson -- The legend of Alexandra & Rose / Jon Klassen -- What's coming / Arthur Slad -- An easy gig / M.T. Anderson -- Mr. Black / Yvonne Prinz -- The foot dragger / M.E. Kerr -- Trick / Adam Rex -- Hank / Dean Lore -- One of a kind / Sarah Weeks -- A walk too far / Gloria Whelan -- A very short story / Holly Black -- Deep six / Faye Kellerman -- The turn of the screw by Henry James, a novel as told by Lisa Brown in fewer than 30 seconds / Lisa Brown -- The attack of the flying moustaches / Pseudonymous Bosch -- Takowanda / Nadia Aguiar -- Heart stopper / Sienna Mercer -- Up to my elbow / Jack Gantos -- Four gleams in the moonlight / Stephen Marche -- The goblin book / Brad Meltzer -- Worms / Lane Smith -- The dare / Carol Gorman -- The ballad of John Grepsy / David Rich -- Soup / Jenny Nimmo -- The creeping hand / Margaret Atwood -- Wet sand, little teeth / Mariko Tamaki -- A thousand faces / Brian Selznick -- Chocolate cake / Francine Prose -- At the water's edge / Ayelet Waldman -- My worst nightmare / R.L. Stine -- The beast outside / Adele Griffin -- Unannounced / Alize Kellerman -- Kruder's Sausage Haus / Mark Crilley -- There's something under the bed / Allan Stratton -- Cat's paw / Sarah L. Thomson -- Horrorku / Katherine Applegate -- The itch / Avi -- The new me: a pantoum / Gail Carson Levine -- Always eleven / David Stahler Jr. -- Aloft / Carson Ellis -- Skittering / Tui T. Sutherland -- Stuck in the middle / Abi Slone -- All fingers and thumbs! / Joseph Delaney -- Don't wet the bed / Alan Gratz -- The final word / Brett Helquist, Josh Greenhut -- The shadow / Neil Gaiman -- A day at the lake / Lesley Livingston -- Whispered / Jon Scieszka -- A disturbing limerick / Vladimir Radunsky -- Through the veil / Alison McGhee -- the rash / Daneil Ehrenhaft -- When nightmares walk / Melissa Marr -- On a Tuesday during that time of year / Chris Raschka -- Death rides a pink bicycle / Stacey Godenir -- I'm not afraid / Dan Gutman -- The doll / Alice Kuipers -- Easy over / Frank Viva -- Them / Libba Bray -- Tiger Kitty / Joyce Carol Oates -- Inventory / Jonathan Lethem -- Shortcut / Michael Connelly -- Strawberry bubbles / Lauren Myracle -- We think you do / Barry Yourgrau -- The prisoner of Eternia / Aaron Renier -- In conclusion / Gregory Maguire.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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A collection of very short horror stories written by an assortment of popular offers.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Grades 3 and upTurn the lights off, get a flashlight, and check your bedroom for monsters, ghosts, ghouls, or axe murderes before settling down with these thirty-second scaaaaaaaaaaaary stories from some of your favorite authors.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you’re looking for a book to read aloud to your kids (or your classroom!) during Halloween time, this is the one to pick up. It includes various genres, such as short stories, haikus, comics, limericks, etc. Also, with monsters under the bed, possessed toys, alien parents, ghosts, and a handful of other things, Half-Minute Horrors pretty much covers all the bases for creepiness.The stories are short (I think the longest one was a little over 2 pages), yet incredibly entertaining. Yes, there are some that I didn’t like very much, but for the most part, I was chuckling my way through Half-Minute Horrors. If you read it to younger kids, there is a good chance some of these stories will scare them, so if you’re worried about giving your kid nightmares or something, be sure to look it over. However, I definitely recommend including this book in your Halloween celebrations.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Lots of fun to read but can give you lots of goosebumps! There are many stories but about 1-2 pages per a story! A fun book to read if you love being scared!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Half-Minute Horrors is a collection of 72 very short and very scary poems written by many popular children's authors. Many of the poems have illustrations which enhance the experience for the reader. I enjoyed this book of poems, and so did my 10 year old son. These poems are scary, and some of the themes and content may be disturbing to younger children. Before I read any of these poems to a classroom, I would have parents look at them first. The book contains several poems I feel would be appropriate to share in the classroom, with parents OK first. Extension Activity: Lanterne Poem1. Introduce children to lanterne poems, in which five lines form the shape of a Japanese lantern. Share an example, and let children recite it with you and clap out the syllables in each line. 2. Revisit each line and count the syllables together (in order, 1,2,3,4, & 1) Provide children with a simple line-byline patter to follow: 1 syllable2 syllables3 syllables4 syllables1 syllable3. Invite children to use the pattern to create a new lanterne poem. You might suggest they choose another animal. Have them offer ideas for what the animal might be doing. List children's ideas on chart paper. Then invite them to see which words fit the pattern. (You might circle those that do to eliminate confusion.) Children might suggest: The fat fox is running around the red barn.I found this activity in the book: Literacy-Building Transitioin Activities Written by: Ellen Booth Church (Scholastic)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Short horror stories, some of which made me feel scared. This is not necessarily a hard thing.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Billed as a "collection of instant frights from the world's most astonishing authors and artists," Half-Minute Horrors lives up to its title by presenting super-short sudden fiction to middle grade readers who like a little creepiness. Just a little, not too much. A set-up, some sort of mystery, and an unsettling cliffhanger of an ending are the norm here, almost all of them short enough to read in the promised half a minute.And when I say a little creepiness that doesn't mean they can't be somewhat disturbing. There are implications of cannibalism, creatures laying in wait to swallow you whole, disembodied hands that come calling while you sleep... but all stopped right at the moment of impact so that the reader can quickly turn the page if necessary. Because the engagement is so short there isn't enough time to plant too strong a mental picture to disturb. Yeah, if you think about some of these stories long enough they can really delve into truly terrifying territory, but the reader interested in horror is going to feel cheated if the author or the story pulls its punch too much or too quickly. Many of these stories plant their final, fatal twist in the last line for maximum impact so that even the seemingly odd story suddenly can turn on a dime.There are also some illustrated stories - I hesitate to call them comics, but some do take that format - which perform the graphic equivilent of their narrative counterparts. Perhaps only "Worms" by Lane Smith, a visually retelling of the gory old rhyme "The worms go in, the worms go out..." goes the furthest with its graphic depiction of life pre- and post-humus. Still, all good creepy fun.One of the things this book reminded me of was a series of books I had as a boy called "One Minute Mysteries" which would set the reader up with a drawing room situation and some details that would allow a reader to guess what had happened. Only I could never guess correctly and instead of enjoying the mystery I found the books frustrating because they made me feel stupid. I suppose the idea of a minute mystery was meant for boys like me who (at the time) were struggling with reading, but that book sent me the wrong direction. Perhaps the lack of character and emotion was the problem, but I never really got into the mystery genre as a result.There's no similar problem here with Half-Minute Horrors because the stories clearly spell out the (pending) doom, leaving the reader to invest as much emotion as their own fears permit. The various authors are all top-notch – M.T. Anderson, Adam Rex, Sarah Weeks, Holly Black, Jack Gantos, Jon Scieszka, Avi, and Lauren Myracle to name but a scant few –and include some generally regarded as adult writers, like Margaret Atwood and Jonathan Lethem, delivering on a wide variety of themes.I realize this comes too late to incorporate into Halloween lesson plans, but I would hope that the audience for this kind of thing sees this as more of an evergreen title. I think for the reluctant reader the ability to whiz through dozens of stories at one sitting will make the book feel much shorter than its 130 pages, and for other readers the shortness of these stories can serve as a sort of palate cleanser between much larger books, a sampler platter of ghoulish delights.Yuk, did I just write that last semi-blurb-worthy sentence?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An anthology of very short (one or two page), sort-of scary stories by an assortment of authors and illustrators. Jon Klassen's Legend story/art was particularly hilarious.Contents include: Something you ought to know / Lemony Snicket -- The chicken or the egg / Jerry Spinelli -- In hiding / Kenneth Oppel -- The old man in the picture / Richard Sala -- The babysitter / Erin Hunter -- Grand entrance / James Patterson -- Halloween mask / Sonya Sones -- Tenton / Tom Genrich & Michele Perry -- Nanny / Angela Johnson -- The legend of Alexandra & Rose / Jon Klassen -- What's coming / Arthur Slad -- An easy gig / M.T. Anderson -- Mr. Black / Yvonne Prinz -- The foot dragger / M.E. Kerr -- Trick / Adam Rex -- Hank / Dean Lore -- One of a kind / Sarah Weeks -- A walk too far / Gloria Whelan -- A very short story / Holly Black -- Deep six / Faye Kellerman -- The turn of the screw by Henry James, a novel as told by Lisa Brown in fewer than 30 seconds / Lisa Brown -- The attack of the flying moustaches / Pseudonymous Bosch -- Takowanda / Nadia Aguiar -- Heart stopper / Sienna Mercer -- Up to my elbow / Jack Gantos -- Four gleams in the moonlight / Stephen Marche -- The goblin book / Brad Meltzer -- Worms / Lane Smith -- The dare / Carol Gorman -- The ballad of John Grepsy / David Rich -- Soup / Jenny Nimmo -- The creeping hand / Margaret Atwood -- Wet sand, little teeth / Mariko Tamaki -- A thousand faces / Brian Selznick -- Chocolate cake / Francine Prose -- At the water's edge / Ayelet Waldman -- My worst nightmare / R.L. Stine -- The beast outside / Adele Griffin -- Unannounced / Alize Kellerman -- Kruder's Sausage Haus / Mark Crilley -- There's something under the bed / Allan Stratton -- Cat's paw / Sarah L. Thomson -- Horrorku / Katherine Applegate -- The itch / Avi -- The new me: a pantoum / Gail Carson Levine -- Always eleven / David Stahler Jr. -- Aloft / Carson Ellis -- Skittering / Tui T. Sutherland -- Stuck in the middle / Abi Slone -- All fingers and thumbs! / Joseph Delaney -- Don't wet the bed / Alan Gratz -- The final word / Brett Helquist, Josh Greenhut -- The shadow / Neil Gaiman -- A day at the lake / Lesley Livingston -- Whispered / Jon Scieszka -- A disturbing limerick / Vladimir Radunsky -- Through the veil / Alison McGhee -- the rash / Daneil Ehrenhaft -- When nightmares walk / Melissa Marr -- On a Tuesday during that time of year / Chris Raschka -- Death rides a pink bicycle / Stacey Godenir -- I'm not afraid / Dan Gutman -- The doll / Alice Kuipers -- Easy over / Frank Viva -- Them / Libba Bray -- Tiger Kitty / Joyce Carol Oates -- Inventory / Jonathan Lethem -- Shortcut / Michael Connelly -- Strawberry bubbles / Lauren Myracle -- We think you do / Barry Yourgrau -- The prisoner of Eternia / Aaron Renier -- In conclusion / Gregory Maguire.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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