Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

Nick is an unusual name for a pretty young woman. And Nick Buckley has been leading an unusual life of late. First, on a treacherous Cornish hillside, the brakes on her car fail. Then, on a coastal path, a falling boulder misses her by inches. Safe in bed, she is almost crushed by a painting. Upon discovering a bullet hole in Nick's sun hat, Hercule Poirot (who had come to Cornwall for a simple holiday with his friend Captain Hastings) decides that the girl needs his protection. At the same time, he begins to unravel the mystery of a murder that hasn't been committed. Yet.

Topics: England, Series, Suspenseful, Tense, Conspiracy, Crime, Murder, Private Investigators, Inheritance, Death, 20th Century, Female Author, and British Author

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061749278
List price: $8.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Peril at End House
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Peril at End House is a worthy entry in Christie's Hercule Poirot portfolio. The story contains plenty of murder, intrigue and deception to satisfy any lover of mysteries.At the start Poirot is retired and intends to stay that way. His endearing conceit lets slip that England won't have their finest detective to help them solve crimes anymore, but it's time to move aside for a younger generation. Naturally, a murder eventually finds Poirot and his sense of duty pulls him back into the fold. No doubt his innate curiosity had something to do with it too.I appreciate the charm of Poirot being slightly off his game in this book as he is occasionally caught unaware by events. Seeing the famed detective flustered from time to time is a welcomed departure.more
Nick Buckley is a pretty young woman living in a ramshackle mansion on the English coast. She seems to be terribly accident prone, with the brakes failing on her car, a falling boulder barely missing her, and an oil painting almost crushing her in bed. Luckily (or is it?) for her, Hercule Poirot is taken in by this girl and her “accidents” when he discovers a bullet-hole in Nick's sun hat. Hercule comes out of retirement to protect the girl and unravel the mystery of a murder that hasn't yet been committed.When I checked this out from the library I hadn’t realized that I had recently watched the BBC Poirot solve this case. At first I was disappointed I already knew the end, but I found I listened to the story differently and was able to pick up on some subtle clues and foreshadowing. One thing that really struck me was how much of an ass Hastings was in this book. He has this superiority complex with nothing to be superior about. It seems his role in the book was to blurt out inane observations to have Poirot make sense of them and as a result to highlight how much smarter, and genteel, Poirot is. I thought this was a heavy handed tactic. And it was even more disappointing, especially since this audio book was read by Hugh Fraser, who plays a likeable (albeit still slightly bumbling) Hastings in the BBC series.more
All in all a rather unspectacular outing for Poirot and Hastings. Hastings seems to enjoy marriage mainly by not being on the same continent as his wife and he becomes, book by book, less an active part of the investigation. Poirot seems to be a caricature of himself and indeed only “solves” the case after all the facts are basically dropped in his lap and after he has clearly mis-solved it. Once again we see that there are at least two sets of laws in England; one for the rich/members of the gentry and the other for the poor. Japp appears on the scene for no reason and Poirot wanders around speaking in riddles for no purpose. Not one of Christie’s stronger efforts.more
abridged audiobook, read by Hugh Fraser, abridged by Kati Nicholl, 3 CD set, running time approx 3 hoursPoirot has retired, and is taking his leisure in a seaside town, determined not to take on any new cases. But when a pretty young woman by the nickname of Nick tells him about a series of near-fatal accidents that have befallen her, he cannot resist temptation. The accidents are clearly not accidents, and the young lady must be protected. He is determined to unmask the killer before one of the accidents proves fatal. Alas, the killer strikes again -- but strikes down Nick's cousin, who had the misfortune to be wearing Nick's distinctive wrap. Now Poirot'spersonal pride is at stake, and there is still Nick to protect...Red herrings and side plots abound, but Poirot gets there in the end. It's a beautifully constructed book, with the answer right in front of the reader from early in the book, concealed by some artful misdirection. The audiobook is read by Hugh Fraser. who plays Hastings in the tv series. Fraser is generally a good reader, but I found his portrayal of Poirot rather off-putting. He uses a very strong accent that in comparison with Suchet's performance sounds like an overplayed stereotype. Of course, part of the problem here is that Suchet *is* Poirot for me, and anything else would sound wrong -- and my subconscious attention is drawn to it because Hastings sounds right.In spite of which, I enjoyed this 3 CD set a lot. The story has been abridged well, and I enjoy listening to Hugh Fraser. I happened to pick this up in The Works for four pounds, and think that it was superb value for money at that price. List price is 13 pounds, although the online shops are listing it for less. I might think twice about paying full price for others in the series because of my issue with Fraser's portrayal of Poirot, but I wouldn't have considered it a waste of money. One minor point with the cheap version offered in The Works -- it's a very simple case with only one spindle for the 3 CDs, so you have to lift the first discs out to get at the later discs, with an additional risk of scratching one eventually. It's also available in download.more
Hercule Poirot Stumbles Across a Difficult ChallengeThis book is exactly what you come to expect from an Agatha Christie mystery, but with a change in Hercule Poirot, the famous detective and star of this mystery series. He has just retired and is slowly settling into a quiet, calm life of leisure and is refusing to be called back into duty. His mind, he thinks, is made up. However, a new mystery finds him, small and subtle at first, then shows itself to have a sinister meaning. He can’t help but observe that which is right in front of him, and without meaning to, he is drawn into its web, and begins to apply his detective skills.The great Hercule Poirot, who is known far and wide for his unmatched detective skills, can’t resist asking one question, then another, then another. A perplexing and potentially deadly set of circumstances takes shape, and his concern for the wellbeing of a young woman he happens to meet, leads him to investigate. However, the motives and players behind this mystery prove themselves difficult for him to ascertain. Where he was always bursting with confidence and assuredness in his perceptions, skills, and outcomes, he is now struggling with something unfamiliar to him – a shaky self-confidence that worsens and lingering uncertainty. He finds himself bumbling about without meaning to. As events unfold, he feels powerless to stop them. His once sharp and nearly infallible intellect and investigative skills seem to be outmatched. His frustration grows and so do his mistakes, missteps, and incorrect assumptions.With its intriguing twists and turns, Peril at End House is a very engaging and rewarding mystery tale and will be sure to please die-hard Agatha Christie fans as well as those new to the stories.Rai Aren, co-author of Secret of the Sandsmore
Originally published in the US in 1932, and then in the UK later in the same year. I listened to an unabridged audio book read by Hugh Fraser. It features Hercule Poirot, Captain Hastings, and, towards the end, Inspector Japp.It is Poirot's 6th novel, and there's a couple of gentle references in the novel to his previous case THE MYSTERY OF THE BLUE TRAIN published in 1928.Hastings and Poirot are having a week's holiday at St. Loo in Cornwall. Hastings has recently returned from Argentina, seemingly having left his wife behind. Poirot has retired and turns down a request from the Home Secretary to go up to London to take on a most urgent case. However he reserves the right to take on a new case if it interests him.As always Poirot is attracted to a pretty young thing, Miss Nick Buckley, who appears to have recently been shot at. When he hears that she has had several near encounters with death just recently Poirot decides to make her protection his business. Nick Buckley is a young flapper living well beyond her means at End House. She is surrounded by a coterie of similar care-free young things who party a lot and experiment with drugs like cocaine. Any one of them could be a danger to Miss Nick, but why would any of them want to kill her?Despite his own confidence in his own abilities, PERIL AT END HOUSE clearly demonstrates that even the great Hercule Poirot is fallible. Poirot says that Hastings always leaps to the wrong conclusions, and so we have come to expect Hastings to be led astray by sentiment, but not Hercule Poirot who prides himself on his deductive methods and his use of "the little grey cells". Agatha Christie's behind-the-hand smirking at her own pompous creation is almost palpable.Without doubt, the beautiful narration of Hugh Fraser, who has appeared in a number of the TV episodes as Hastings, contributed to my enjoyment.But let's take nothing away from the cleverness of the plot, nor from the controversial ending in which, to Hastings' horror, Poirot allows the murderer to cheat the gallows.more
The thing about a Hercule Poirot Mystery is that he's always in the picture; quite unlike a Miss Marple Mystery wherein the supposed sleuth only appears at or near the end to provide the summing up. This was a good one. I'm intrigued by detective writers' Christie and Sayers's use of the resort as a venue for crime.more
This early Poirot/Hastings novel is good fun. Our duo are holidaying on the Cornish coast, and meet the adorable Nick, a lovely young thing who's inherited the eponymous Victorian pile. Oh, and someone's trying to kill her. Poirot strives to head off tragedy, but his vigilance is not enough . . . .Although Christie's early work includes some of her best, in this one she still seems to be finding her way. Poirot's character is a bit jumpy here, and the solution to the plot seemed pretty obvious to me from a ways off. Still, I'd recommend this one for its lively writing, good period detail, and general Christie-esque charm.more
I love this book the plot has so many twists and turns to that you never quite know where you are, as well a few red herrings as well. Oh yes and the denoument makes sense.more
Poirot has retired. Really. He means it. Even an appeal from the Home Secretary won't change his mind. But when he nearly witnesses a murder attempt, he begins to rethink things. Pretty Nick Buckley has had four near misses in three days. The first three weren't much, but the latest one involved a bullet that narrowly missed her. But as Poirot begins his investigation, he finds no motive for her death. There are plenty of suspects - her stuffy cousin, her would-be suitor, a close friend and her mysterious lover, the new Australian neighbors - but no real reason any of them would want her dead. But despite all his precautions, the murderer strikes. Poirot will have to act fast if he's not to let a killer get away.I enjoyed this one. There was a plot twist that reminded me a bit of The ABC Murders, one of my favorite of her books. Poirot is in top form in this one and it was a fun read.CMBmore
The twists in this books were so clever. it is a must readmore
Read all 12 reviews

Reviews

Peril at End House is a worthy entry in Christie's Hercule Poirot portfolio. The story contains plenty of murder, intrigue and deception to satisfy any lover of mysteries.At the start Poirot is retired and intends to stay that way. His endearing conceit lets slip that England won't have their finest detective to help them solve crimes anymore, but it's time to move aside for a younger generation. Naturally, a murder eventually finds Poirot and his sense of duty pulls him back into the fold. No doubt his innate curiosity had something to do with it too.I appreciate the charm of Poirot being slightly off his game in this book as he is occasionally caught unaware by events. Seeing the famed detective flustered from time to time is a welcomed departure.more
Nick Buckley is a pretty young woman living in a ramshackle mansion on the English coast. She seems to be terribly accident prone, with the brakes failing on her car, a falling boulder barely missing her, and an oil painting almost crushing her in bed. Luckily (or is it?) for her, Hercule Poirot is taken in by this girl and her “accidents” when he discovers a bullet-hole in Nick's sun hat. Hercule comes out of retirement to protect the girl and unravel the mystery of a murder that hasn't yet been committed.When I checked this out from the library I hadn’t realized that I had recently watched the BBC Poirot solve this case. At first I was disappointed I already knew the end, but I found I listened to the story differently and was able to pick up on some subtle clues and foreshadowing. One thing that really struck me was how much of an ass Hastings was in this book. He has this superiority complex with nothing to be superior about. It seems his role in the book was to blurt out inane observations to have Poirot make sense of them and as a result to highlight how much smarter, and genteel, Poirot is. I thought this was a heavy handed tactic. And it was even more disappointing, especially since this audio book was read by Hugh Fraser, who plays a likeable (albeit still slightly bumbling) Hastings in the BBC series.more
All in all a rather unspectacular outing for Poirot and Hastings. Hastings seems to enjoy marriage mainly by not being on the same continent as his wife and he becomes, book by book, less an active part of the investigation. Poirot seems to be a caricature of himself and indeed only “solves” the case after all the facts are basically dropped in his lap and after he has clearly mis-solved it. Once again we see that there are at least two sets of laws in England; one for the rich/members of the gentry and the other for the poor. Japp appears on the scene for no reason and Poirot wanders around speaking in riddles for no purpose. Not one of Christie’s stronger efforts.more
abridged audiobook, read by Hugh Fraser, abridged by Kati Nicholl, 3 CD set, running time approx 3 hoursPoirot has retired, and is taking his leisure in a seaside town, determined not to take on any new cases. But when a pretty young woman by the nickname of Nick tells him about a series of near-fatal accidents that have befallen her, he cannot resist temptation. The accidents are clearly not accidents, and the young lady must be protected. He is determined to unmask the killer before one of the accidents proves fatal. Alas, the killer strikes again -- but strikes down Nick's cousin, who had the misfortune to be wearing Nick's distinctive wrap. Now Poirot'spersonal pride is at stake, and there is still Nick to protect...Red herrings and side plots abound, but Poirot gets there in the end. It's a beautifully constructed book, with the answer right in front of the reader from early in the book, concealed by some artful misdirection. The audiobook is read by Hugh Fraser. who plays Hastings in the tv series. Fraser is generally a good reader, but I found his portrayal of Poirot rather off-putting. He uses a very strong accent that in comparison with Suchet's performance sounds like an overplayed stereotype. Of course, part of the problem here is that Suchet *is* Poirot for me, and anything else would sound wrong -- and my subconscious attention is drawn to it because Hastings sounds right.In spite of which, I enjoyed this 3 CD set a lot. The story has been abridged well, and I enjoy listening to Hugh Fraser. I happened to pick this up in The Works for four pounds, and think that it was superb value for money at that price. List price is 13 pounds, although the online shops are listing it for less. I might think twice about paying full price for others in the series because of my issue with Fraser's portrayal of Poirot, but I wouldn't have considered it a waste of money. One minor point with the cheap version offered in The Works -- it's a very simple case with only one spindle for the 3 CDs, so you have to lift the first discs out to get at the later discs, with an additional risk of scratching one eventually. It's also available in download.more
Hercule Poirot Stumbles Across a Difficult ChallengeThis book is exactly what you come to expect from an Agatha Christie mystery, but with a change in Hercule Poirot, the famous detective and star of this mystery series. He has just retired and is slowly settling into a quiet, calm life of leisure and is refusing to be called back into duty. His mind, he thinks, is made up. However, a new mystery finds him, small and subtle at first, then shows itself to have a sinister meaning. He can’t help but observe that which is right in front of him, and without meaning to, he is drawn into its web, and begins to apply his detective skills.The great Hercule Poirot, who is known far and wide for his unmatched detective skills, can’t resist asking one question, then another, then another. A perplexing and potentially deadly set of circumstances takes shape, and his concern for the wellbeing of a young woman he happens to meet, leads him to investigate. However, the motives and players behind this mystery prove themselves difficult for him to ascertain. Where he was always bursting with confidence and assuredness in his perceptions, skills, and outcomes, he is now struggling with something unfamiliar to him – a shaky self-confidence that worsens and lingering uncertainty. He finds himself bumbling about without meaning to. As events unfold, he feels powerless to stop them. His once sharp and nearly infallible intellect and investigative skills seem to be outmatched. His frustration grows and so do his mistakes, missteps, and incorrect assumptions.With its intriguing twists and turns, Peril at End House is a very engaging and rewarding mystery tale and will be sure to please die-hard Agatha Christie fans as well as those new to the stories.Rai Aren, co-author of Secret of the Sandsmore
Originally published in the US in 1932, and then in the UK later in the same year. I listened to an unabridged audio book read by Hugh Fraser. It features Hercule Poirot, Captain Hastings, and, towards the end, Inspector Japp.It is Poirot's 6th novel, and there's a couple of gentle references in the novel to his previous case THE MYSTERY OF THE BLUE TRAIN published in 1928.Hastings and Poirot are having a week's holiday at St. Loo in Cornwall. Hastings has recently returned from Argentina, seemingly having left his wife behind. Poirot has retired and turns down a request from the Home Secretary to go up to London to take on a most urgent case. However he reserves the right to take on a new case if it interests him.As always Poirot is attracted to a pretty young thing, Miss Nick Buckley, who appears to have recently been shot at. When he hears that she has had several near encounters with death just recently Poirot decides to make her protection his business. Nick Buckley is a young flapper living well beyond her means at End House. She is surrounded by a coterie of similar care-free young things who party a lot and experiment with drugs like cocaine. Any one of them could be a danger to Miss Nick, but why would any of them want to kill her?Despite his own confidence in his own abilities, PERIL AT END HOUSE clearly demonstrates that even the great Hercule Poirot is fallible. Poirot says that Hastings always leaps to the wrong conclusions, and so we have come to expect Hastings to be led astray by sentiment, but not Hercule Poirot who prides himself on his deductive methods and his use of "the little grey cells". Agatha Christie's behind-the-hand smirking at her own pompous creation is almost palpable.Without doubt, the beautiful narration of Hugh Fraser, who has appeared in a number of the TV episodes as Hastings, contributed to my enjoyment.But let's take nothing away from the cleverness of the plot, nor from the controversial ending in which, to Hastings' horror, Poirot allows the murderer to cheat the gallows.more
The thing about a Hercule Poirot Mystery is that he's always in the picture; quite unlike a Miss Marple Mystery wherein the supposed sleuth only appears at or near the end to provide the summing up. This was a good one. I'm intrigued by detective writers' Christie and Sayers's use of the resort as a venue for crime.more
This early Poirot/Hastings novel is good fun. Our duo are holidaying on the Cornish coast, and meet the adorable Nick, a lovely young thing who's inherited the eponymous Victorian pile. Oh, and someone's trying to kill her. Poirot strives to head off tragedy, but his vigilance is not enough . . . .Although Christie's early work includes some of her best, in this one she still seems to be finding her way. Poirot's character is a bit jumpy here, and the solution to the plot seemed pretty obvious to me from a ways off. Still, I'd recommend this one for its lively writing, good period detail, and general Christie-esque charm.more
I love this book the plot has so many twists and turns to that you never quite know where you are, as well a few red herrings as well. Oh yes and the denoument makes sense.more
Poirot has retired. Really. He means it. Even an appeal from the Home Secretary won't change his mind. But when he nearly witnesses a murder attempt, he begins to rethink things. Pretty Nick Buckley has had four near misses in three days. The first three weren't much, but the latest one involved a bullet that narrowly missed her. But as Poirot begins his investigation, he finds no motive for her death. There are plenty of suspects - her stuffy cousin, her would-be suitor, a close friend and her mysterious lover, the new Australian neighbors - but no real reason any of them would want her dead. But despite all his precautions, the murderer strikes. Poirot will have to act fast if he's not to let a killer get away.I enjoyed this one. There was a plot twist that reminded me a bit of The ABC Murders, one of my favorite of her books. Poirot is in top form in this one and it was a fun read.CMBmore
The twists in this books were so clever. it is a must readmore
Load more
scribd