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Classic short stories that expand the epic Legend of Drizzt®!

For years, the Legend of Drizzt has included short stories published in Forgotten Realms® anthologies and Dragon™ magazine. Collected here for the first time are all the classic stories—and one all new tale—by The New York Times best-selling author R.A. Salvatore!

From the startling origin of Drizzt’s panther companion, to the tale of Jarlaxle and Entreri’s first encounter with the dragon sisters, the tales in The Collected Stories enrich this epic series, and many are available here for the first time in years.
Published: Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9780786961450
List price: $7.99
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Not as interesting as the first book, but you do get to see Drizzt developing as a person and forging friendships with other races.more
Exile is a better read than Homeland. It starts off interestingly when we are given a glimpse of a transformed Drizzt. This is no longer the compassionate Drizzt from the first book, but Drizzt's other self, the Hunter. The Hunter is a creature of pure instinct, whose only goal is to survive, at any cost. Drizzt's alter-ego is the reason for his survival in the long years alone in the Underdark, but is also the reason he flees to Blingdenstone later. Unfortunately, the story loses its momentum after this.more
I ended up skimming the last third of this book, because honestly, I'd had about as much of Salvatore's writing as I could stand. I read Homeland, and while it was a fun story, some of Salvatore's writing quirks made it a slog for me. The slogging continued with Exile. I've never seen characters who growl and snarl so much. It was driving me bonkers. The book is also quite heavy on fights, which got a little tiresome. I know, it's a D&D book, of course there's going to be a lot of fighting, but still, there was a bit much for my liking.I tried Homeland and Exile out because I kept hearing / reading about how great Salvatore's stuff is, and I must say: I don't really understand why. Maybe I just don't get along with his writing style. I noted in my review of Homeland that I'd be finishing the Dark Elf Trilogy to see how it ends, but I don't think that's going to happen now. I'll just look up a plot summary to see where Drizzt ends up.more
This is really a fantastic book. It doesn’t have the culture that Homeland had, but it really shows Drizzt begin his life-long fight of following his principles. I guess officially we saw the very beginning of that in Homeland, but then he was really still trying to figure out what his principles were. The chase that happens between Drizzt and Zaknafein adds a healthy amount of suspense to the book. Also, Belwar Dissengulp, one of my favorite RAS characters, makes his sole appearance in this book. “Bivrip!”more
This is where the series started to go astray for me.more
As the sequel to Homeland, R.A. Salvatore follows the adventures of Drizzt Do'Urden as he leaves Menzoberranzan and travels throughout the perilous Underdark. This is easily the darkest piece of The Dark Elf Trilogy but Salvatore's action scenes and amazing characters - including new and old heroes and villains - set the pace for an awesome second installment.more
A decent ending - at least I was glad it was over.more
Read all 7 reviews

Reviews

Not as interesting as the first book, but you do get to see Drizzt developing as a person and forging friendships with other races.more
Exile is a better read than Homeland. It starts off interestingly when we are given a glimpse of a transformed Drizzt. This is no longer the compassionate Drizzt from the first book, but Drizzt's other self, the Hunter. The Hunter is a creature of pure instinct, whose only goal is to survive, at any cost. Drizzt's alter-ego is the reason for his survival in the long years alone in the Underdark, but is also the reason he flees to Blingdenstone later. Unfortunately, the story loses its momentum after this.more
I ended up skimming the last third of this book, because honestly, I'd had about as much of Salvatore's writing as I could stand. I read Homeland, and while it was a fun story, some of Salvatore's writing quirks made it a slog for me. The slogging continued with Exile. I've never seen characters who growl and snarl so much. It was driving me bonkers. The book is also quite heavy on fights, which got a little tiresome. I know, it's a D&D book, of course there's going to be a lot of fighting, but still, there was a bit much for my liking.I tried Homeland and Exile out because I kept hearing / reading about how great Salvatore's stuff is, and I must say: I don't really understand why. Maybe I just don't get along with his writing style. I noted in my review of Homeland that I'd be finishing the Dark Elf Trilogy to see how it ends, but I don't think that's going to happen now. I'll just look up a plot summary to see where Drizzt ends up.more
This is really a fantastic book. It doesn’t have the culture that Homeland had, but it really shows Drizzt begin his life-long fight of following his principles. I guess officially we saw the very beginning of that in Homeland, but then he was really still trying to figure out what his principles were. The chase that happens between Drizzt and Zaknafein adds a healthy amount of suspense to the book. Also, Belwar Dissengulp, one of my favorite RAS characters, makes his sole appearance in this book. “Bivrip!”more
This is where the series started to go astray for me.more
As the sequel to Homeland, R.A. Salvatore follows the adventures of Drizzt Do'Urden as he leaves Menzoberranzan and travels throughout the perilous Underdark. This is easily the darkest piece of The Dark Elf Trilogy but Salvatore's action scenes and amazing characters - including new and old heroes and villains - set the pace for an awesome second installment.more
A decent ending - at least I was glad it was over.more
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