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Piece of My Heart is Peter Robinson’s outstanding sixteenth novel in the acclaimed Inspector Banks series. Richly textured with the music and conflicting mores of 1960s Britain, the story weaves between two eras as it explores just how dangerously things can go awry when one generation is estranged from the next, when fathers no longer understand their daughters.

The novel opens in 1969. Yorkshire’s first outdoor rock festival has just finished, and the psychedelic pastoral band the Mad Hatters and other top British groups have departed. Even the last of their fans has gone, leaving behind only a muddy field, littered with rubbish. Volunteers are cleaning up when one of them finds the body of a young woman inside a sleeping bag.

Stanley Chadwick, the straitlaced detective called in to find her killer, could not have less in common with — or less regard for — the people he now has to question: young, disrespectful, long-haired hippies who smoke marijuana and live by the pulsing beats of rock and roll. And he has almost just as little in common with his own daughter, who lied to him about her whereabouts and slipped off to the festival.

More than thirty-five years later, Inspector Alan Banks is investigating the murder of a freelance music journalist who was working on a feature about the Mad Hatters for Mojo magazine. This is not the first time that the Mad Hatters, now aging rock superstars, have been brushed by tragedy, and Banks has to delve into the past to find out exactly what hornet’s nest the journalist inadvertently stirred up.

This eagerly awaited novel showcases the many reasons why Peter Robinson is among the small elite of authors internationally whose mysteries are nothing less than works of art.


From the Hardcover edition.
Published: Random House Publishing Group on
ISBN: 9781551992006
List price: $11.99
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I enjoyed the past and present merging in the hunt for truth behind a murder in 1969. Robinson has done his research in painting life during the 60's and seeing how the lives of those people has changed to the present day. The identity of the murderer kept me guessing.more
One of Robinson's best so far. He manages the two timelines beautifully and finds a comfortable balance between mystery, history and personal stories.more
too long. too much personal life. good story.more
As usual, Peter Robinson treats us to quality writing and an unexpected resolution to the mystery. This series is great, but this is not my favorite because the time shifts from the sixties to the present gets tiresome.more
Nice detective. It's a thick book which a like. It interweaves past and present which makes it better then just a ordinary detective. The end could have been better though.more
An excellent book amidst an excellent series about Inspector Banks. A girl is murdered at a rock concert in 1969 which is somehow relevant to the murder of a music journalist over thirty years later. This was like reading two books at once, both being very absorbing investigations. Alan Banks and Annie drag the past back to life when they investigate the Mad Hatter band and question the motives of the officer conducting the 1969 murder enquiry. Absolutely fascinating, excellently done and please can we have some more?more
A mystery told in a non linear fashion, events and a murder in 1969 are related to a murder in 2005. A writer of articles about the music (rock) industry is found dead in 2005. In 1969 a young woman is found murdered in the forest just after a huge rock concert in an open field. Banks is called in to investigate the 2005 murder and solves it with the help of a fellow policewoman, Annie.more
I found this book rather laboured and I thought the author rather crowbarred in all the cultural references. I think this book suffered due to fact that I have read all the Rebus novels first and Ian Rankin uses the pop culture references in a lot more fluid way. I did enjoy the story and I enjoyed the locations in the book as I am from the area where the book is set.more
i like this Yorkshire procedural series about Inspector Banks. this one's got a complicated structure: the PoV alternates between chapters about the first investigation in 1969 and chapters that follow Banks' investigation of a present-day murder that very gradually turns out to be related to the first. not only is the PoV of the lead detectives different, the whole worldview is different, and that turns out to be pertinent to the case. ambitious, to go with that as a form, and it's not seamlessly done, especially with the whole fathers/daughters motif. and yet, an interesting thing to try. one of those books that may improve in my brain over time and end up scoring a significantly higher rating.more
As he launches a probe into the killing of a freelance music journalist, Detective Inspector Alan Banks finds his investigation journeying back in time more than thirty years and into the heart of the mystery surrounding a decades-old crimemore
Another brilliant Inspector Banks novel from Peter Robinson. This time he cleverley interweaves two stories, one from 1969 , the other contemporary which are somehow linked. Excellent background colour on the 60s and later music scenes, adds to the enjoyment. Highly recommended.more
After A Strange Affair, Alan Banks inherits his brother's fancy new car, a bunch of fine wines, the massive home entertainment center, and most importantly, the iPod. All just in time to furnish his new home. Life is good right? Well, not exactly. His old boss has retired and a rather disagreeable new boss has stepped in to make Bank's life just a little nastier. The center of the mystery involves two murders again. One in present day Yorkshire and the other in 1969 Yorkshire. If you have read any number of these books, you know that they are connected somehow. Peter Robinson has come up with yet another narrative style to link the two story lines together. The coupling magic of the two themes is music. Whereas Robinson was deliberately circumspect with the music, Banks is a music afficionado of the nth degree, he goes all out in name dropping the sixties icons of British rock. He links in Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Dylan, et. al. to draw a very nostalgic and yet realistic picture of the sixties. The first murder involves a beautiful young girl at one of the notorious ribald all day music festivals that was so famous in the sixties. The other involves a journalist who is following one of the groups that played at that festival. Robinson follows the two murder investigations via Banks and a new character: Inspector Stanley Chadwick. Chadwick is what Banks is not, yet he is also a bit like Banks in his dogged pursuit of the truth. The juxtopositions of the two styles, the two methodologies and morals keeps the story moving along quite well. Once again Peter Robinson has done it, he has managed to propel the two storylines with a new way of telling the story. In the background. the story of Bank's transition to a new life is beginning to rear its head. He is trying to be friends with Annie Cabbot, he is also trying to come to terms with his son't new found fame. He is now living in the shadow of his brother's presence because of all the material possessions that he inherited. It is kind of touching but also discombobulating. I felt Bank's uneasiness with the constant change and I felt like sitting the bloke down with a pint of Black Sheep and talk him through his uneasiness. I enjoyed this book. Once again, Peter Robinson told a grand story and he kept me on the edge and interested. You can't ask for any more from a mystery.more
Read all 13 reviews

Reviews

I enjoyed the past and present merging in the hunt for truth behind a murder in 1969. Robinson has done his research in painting life during the 60's and seeing how the lives of those people has changed to the present day. The identity of the murderer kept me guessing.more
One of Robinson's best so far. He manages the two timelines beautifully and finds a comfortable balance between mystery, history and personal stories.more
too long. too much personal life. good story.more
As usual, Peter Robinson treats us to quality writing and an unexpected resolution to the mystery. This series is great, but this is not my favorite because the time shifts from the sixties to the present gets tiresome.more
Nice detective. It's a thick book which a like. It interweaves past and present which makes it better then just a ordinary detective. The end could have been better though.more
An excellent book amidst an excellent series about Inspector Banks. A girl is murdered at a rock concert in 1969 which is somehow relevant to the murder of a music journalist over thirty years later. This was like reading two books at once, both being very absorbing investigations. Alan Banks and Annie drag the past back to life when they investigate the Mad Hatter band and question the motives of the officer conducting the 1969 murder enquiry. Absolutely fascinating, excellently done and please can we have some more?more
A mystery told in a non linear fashion, events and a murder in 1969 are related to a murder in 2005. A writer of articles about the music (rock) industry is found dead in 2005. In 1969 a young woman is found murdered in the forest just after a huge rock concert in an open field. Banks is called in to investigate the 2005 murder and solves it with the help of a fellow policewoman, Annie.more
I found this book rather laboured and I thought the author rather crowbarred in all the cultural references. I think this book suffered due to fact that I have read all the Rebus novels first and Ian Rankin uses the pop culture references in a lot more fluid way. I did enjoy the story and I enjoyed the locations in the book as I am from the area where the book is set.more
i like this Yorkshire procedural series about Inspector Banks. this one's got a complicated structure: the PoV alternates between chapters about the first investigation in 1969 and chapters that follow Banks' investigation of a present-day murder that very gradually turns out to be related to the first. not only is the PoV of the lead detectives different, the whole worldview is different, and that turns out to be pertinent to the case. ambitious, to go with that as a form, and it's not seamlessly done, especially with the whole fathers/daughters motif. and yet, an interesting thing to try. one of those books that may improve in my brain over time and end up scoring a significantly higher rating.more
As he launches a probe into the killing of a freelance music journalist, Detective Inspector Alan Banks finds his investigation journeying back in time more than thirty years and into the heart of the mystery surrounding a decades-old crimemore
Another brilliant Inspector Banks novel from Peter Robinson. This time he cleverley interweaves two stories, one from 1969 , the other contemporary which are somehow linked. Excellent background colour on the 60s and later music scenes, adds to the enjoyment. Highly recommended.more
After A Strange Affair, Alan Banks inherits his brother's fancy new car, a bunch of fine wines, the massive home entertainment center, and most importantly, the iPod. All just in time to furnish his new home. Life is good right? Well, not exactly. His old boss has retired and a rather disagreeable new boss has stepped in to make Bank's life just a little nastier. The center of the mystery involves two murders again. One in present day Yorkshire and the other in 1969 Yorkshire. If you have read any number of these books, you know that they are connected somehow. Peter Robinson has come up with yet another narrative style to link the two story lines together. The coupling magic of the two themes is music. Whereas Robinson was deliberately circumspect with the music, Banks is a music afficionado of the nth degree, he goes all out in name dropping the sixties icons of British rock. He links in Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Dylan, et. al. to draw a very nostalgic and yet realistic picture of the sixties. The first murder involves a beautiful young girl at one of the notorious ribald all day music festivals that was so famous in the sixties. The other involves a journalist who is following one of the groups that played at that festival. Robinson follows the two murder investigations via Banks and a new character: Inspector Stanley Chadwick. Chadwick is what Banks is not, yet he is also a bit like Banks in his dogged pursuit of the truth. The juxtopositions of the two styles, the two methodologies and morals keeps the story moving along quite well. Once again Peter Robinson has done it, he has managed to propel the two storylines with a new way of telling the story. In the background. the story of Bank's transition to a new life is beginning to rear its head. He is trying to be friends with Annie Cabbot, he is also trying to come to terms with his son't new found fame. He is now living in the shadow of his brother's presence because of all the material possessions that he inherited. It is kind of touching but also discombobulating. I felt Bank's uneasiness with the constant change and I felt like sitting the bloke down with a pint of Black Sheep and talk him through his uneasiness. I enjoyed this book. Once again, Peter Robinson told a grand story and he kept me on the edge and interested. You can't ask for any more from a mystery.more
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