• book
    0% of Interpreting Daddy completed

From the Publisher

An intelligent, informative, and witty How-To book for the man expecting his first child or the man expecting yet another child. This entertaining and engaging book deals with every facet of fatherhood, from dealing with new in-laws to how your pets will deal with your new bundle of joy (trouble!). Despite the droll approach, there is priceless information and advice herein.

Congratulations!

Published: Brian Montgomery on
ISBN: 9781452388267
List price: $3.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Interpreting Daddy
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

NPR
3 min read

Face-To-Face Sleep Education Plus 'Baby Boxes' Reduces Bed Sharing

Giving new moms face-to-face education about safe sleep practices — and providing them with a cardboard "baby box" where their newborns can sleep right when they get home — reduces the incidence of bed sharing, a significant risk factor for SIDS and other unexpected sleep-related deaths, a study from Temple University in Philadelphia has found. The study is the first to show that a face-to-face education program, coupled with the distribution of baby boxes — which come with a firm mattress and fitted sheet — help reduce risky sleep habits. The program reduced the rate of bed sharing by 25 perc
NPR
2 min read
Personal Growth

Me, Myself, and IKEA: What Our Love For Swedish Furniture Says About Narcissism

It's normal to feel drawn to people you share something with — whether that's a name, or a birthday, or a shared profession or background. But Brett Pelham finds this preference for things and people associated with us goes far beyond what we might expect. He calls this phenomenon Implicit Egotism. "There's at least a modest tendency for women named Georgia to gravitate towards Georgia, women named Virginia to gravitate towards Virginia, and the more closely the name resembles the state, the bigger the effect appears to be," Pelham says. That's not all. People who share the same birthday are s
The Atlantic
5 min read

How Wall-Mounted Changing Tables Enabled Moms to Leave the House

The baby bottoms of Americans born before the 1980s likely never touched a diaper-changing station in a public restroom. Prior to the ‘80s, when parents, and mothers in particular, went to shop or go out to eat, they usually had to fold themselves into the back of a car, balance their wriggling infant on a toilet seat, or crouch on a dirty bathroom floor to change their child’s diaper. In the decades since, changing tables have grown more common, but they still can be hard to find, especially for dads. That is slowly changing: Last fall, President Obama signed a bill that will require all bath