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From the Publisher

The use of this 5000-word Portuguese vocabulary will allow you to understand simple texts and will give you much needed confidence in everyday conversation. Used in combination with a grammar course, it will aid in your ability to correctly compose many phrases. When watching Portuguese films, you will begin to hear and understand more and more words and phrases. This guide will assist you in attaining a higher level that will finally allow you to say: “I can speak Portuguese!”

The vocabulary contains 155 topics including: Basic Concepts, Numbers, Colors, Months, Seasons, Units of Measurement, Clothing & Accessories, Food & Nutrition, Restaurant, Family Members, Relatives, Character, Feelings, Emotions, Diseases, City, Town, Sightseeing, Shopping, Money, House, Home, Office, Working in the Office, Import & Export, Marketing, Job Search, Sports, Education, Computer, Internet, Tools, Nature, Countries, Nationalities and more ...

This book is intended to help you learn, memorize and review over 5000 commonly used Portuguese words. Recommended as additional support material to any language course. Meets the needs of both beginners and advanced learners. Convenient for daily use, reviewing sessions and self-testing activities. Allows you to assess your current vocabulary. This book can also be used by foreign learners of English.

Revised Edition, July 2013. Ref. SW0713

Published: Andrey Taranov on
ISBN: 9781780710372
List price: $5.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Portuguese Vocabulary for English Speakers: 5000 words
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