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From the Publisher

In this bright colorful comic, Gus the clown has trouble with a bug. The story is short, easy to read, and gives practice with simple short vowel words. Beginning readers will be delighted with their success in reading this comic independently.

Published: Gloria Lapin on
ISBN: 9781458152329
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Little Comics For Little Readers: Gus
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