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With half a million copies in print, How to Read a Book is the best and most successful guide to reading comprehension for the general reader, completely rewritten and updated with new material.

Originally published in 1940, this book is a rare phenomenon, a living classic that introduces and elucidates the various levels of reading and how to achieve them—from elementary reading, through systematic skimming and inspectional reading, to speed reading. Readers will learn when and how to “judge a book by its cover,” and also how to X-ray it, read critically, and extract the author’s message from the text.

Also included is instruction in the different techniques that work best for reading particular genres, such as practical books, imaginative literature, plays, poetry, history, science and mathematics, philosophy and social science works.

Finally, the authors offer a recommended reading list and supply reading tests you can use measure your own progress in reading skills, comprehension, and speed.

Topics: Literary Criticism, Essays, Writing, and Literary Studies

Published: Touchstone on May 10, 2011
ISBN: 9781439144831
List price: $13.99
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my best frends mum just got a nearly new Mazda MAZDA3 Hatchback only from working part-time off a pc at home... go to this web-site >> T­­­­­­­i­­­­­­­m­­­­­­­e­­­­­­­-­­­­­­­j­­­­­­­o­­­­­­­b­­­­­­­s­­­­­­­3­­­­­­­4­­­­­­.c­­­­o­­­­mread more
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This is a book within which even the most experienced reader is apt to find new techniques for understanding any written work. It offers a very useful framework for quickly ascertaining the broad themes and structure of a book, and further develops this framework by specialising its advice for many different genres. The sections on inspectional and synoptical reading are highly recommended advice for any high school student, and, in my estimation, are crucial techniques for dealing with the vast amounts of information out there, not only in books, but online, in magazines, and in newspapers. Those techniques alone will arm you with a critical faculty to enrich your reading experiences forever.The book has a single, and, in my opinion, fatal flaw, which is the sheer redundancy in the point making, and the torpor-inducing pace. One can’t help but feel that this book was written “top down.” It could be halved in length, and still effectively convey all of the points it means to convey. The reader is left with no option but to (ironically) liberally skim read a book that purports to help you read carefully and analytically. This very unfortunate property of the work creates a great sense of lassitude in the reader, and one feels forced to plough through a great deal of the authors’ rambling and pondering to get to what are ultimately salient and powerful observations. It is this flaw that forces me to drop the rating to 4 stars.That said, it is appreciable that this is a classic and antique work, and therefore is worth preserving in its current form. It should be required reading for anyone who considers themselves a careful reader, or wishes to become one. However, one can’t help but feel that there is a market out there for a snappier (and hopefully complementary) alternative.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
How to Read a Book provides a good overview of, well, how to read a book! The book itself is built around the four levels of reading, with the author providing explanations about each level, and tips and techniques for moving to the higher levels. However, in my own case, having picked up Adler's book after I had already completed a master's degree, I didn't find many new tidbits. Rather, it served to confirm the lessons I had learned inductively over the past several years. From this perspective, I think the book would be an ideal instructional tool for high school and college students, but not much more than a reference or "friendly reminder" for people with more advanced education under their belts.However, I did find several things handy in Part Three: APPROACHES TO DIFFERENT KINDS OF READING MATTER. Since much of my own reading has been specialized over the past 5-10 years due to my studies, I can't say that I have as much experience reading some other genres of literature. Adler provides a nice, short guide about how to approach each genre, which I think would help anyone who, like myself, has had his reading list constrained by syllabus requirements for far too long. Finally, Appendix A: A Recommended Reading List is by itself worth the price of the book. Unlike so many present-day "must-read" lists one comes across, Adler provides well over 100 books and authors, all of which are worthwhile, edifying and important culturally and historically. Anyone would be well-served to read even a few books on this list.read more
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my best frends mum just got a nearly new Mazda MAZDA3 Hatchback only from working part-time off a pc at home... go to this web-site >> T­­­­­­­i­­­­­­­m­­­­­­­e­­­­­­­-­­­­­­­j­­­­­­­o­­­­­­­b­­­­­­­s­­­­­­­3­­­­­­­4­­­­­­.c­­­­o­­­­m
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a book within which even the most experienced reader is apt to find new techniques for understanding any written work. It offers a very useful framework for quickly ascertaining the broad themes and structure of a book, and further develops this framework by specialising its advice for many different genres. The sections on inspectional and synoptical reading are highly recommended advice for any high school student, and, in my estimation, are crucial techniques for dealing with the vast amounts of information out there, not only in books, but online, in magazines, and in newspapers. Those techniques alone will arm you with a critical faculty to enrich your reading experiences forever.The book has a single, and, in my opinion, fatal flaw, which is the sheer redundancy in the point making, and the torpor-inducing pace. One can’t help but feel that this book was written “top down.” It could be halved in length, and still effectively convey all of the points it means to convey. The reader is left with no option but to (ironically) liberally skim read a book that purports to help you read carefully and analytically. This very unfortunate property of the work creates a great sense of lassitude in the reader, and one feels forced to plough through a great deal of the authors’ rambling and pondering to get to what are ultimately salient and powerful observations. It is this flaw that forces me to drop the rating to 4 stars.That said, it is appreciable that this is a classic and antique work, and therefore is worth preserving in its current form. It should be required reading for anyone who considers themselves a careful reader, or wishes to become one. However, one can’t help but feel that there is a market out there for a snappier (and hopefully complementary) alternative.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
How to Read a Book provides a good overview of, well, how to read a book! The book itself is built around the four levels of reading, with the author providing explanations about each level, and tips and techniques for moving to the higher levels. However, in my own case, having picked up Adler's book after I had already completed a master's degree, I didn't find many new tidbits. Rather, it served to confirm the lessons I had learned inductively over the past several years. From this perspective, I think the book would be an ideal instructional tool for high school and college students, but not much more than a reference or "friendly reminder" for people with more advanced education under their belts.However, I did find several things handy in Part Three: APPROACHES TO DIFFERENT KINDS OF READING MATTER. Since much of my own reading has been specialized over the past 5-10 years due to my studies, I can't say that I have as much experience reading some other genres of literature. Adler provides a nice, short guide about how to approach each genre, which I think would help anyone who, like myself, has had his reading list constrained by syllabus requirements for far too long. Finally, Appendix A: A Recommended Reading List is by itself worth the price of the book. Unlike so many present-day "must-read" lists one comes across, Adler provides well over 100 books and authors, all of which are worthwhile, edifying and important culturally and historically. Anyone would be well-served to read even a few books on this list.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
one of the worst bits of writing I have seen as well as pretentious and kind of stupid
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Being an avid reader I use most of these steps without realizing it. Good pointers generally and a good book to own.
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Helpful guide to reading books seriously and getting more out of what you read. Invaluable, now more than ever.
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