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America’s beloved and distinguished historian presents, in a book of breathtaking excitement, drama, and narrative force, the stirring story of the year of our nation’s birth, 1776, interweaving, on both sides of the Atlantic, the actions and decisions that led Great Britain to undertake a war against her rebellious colonial subjects and that placed America’s survival in the hands of George Washington.

In this masterful book, David McCullough tells the intensely human story of those who marched with General George Washington in the year of the Declaration of Independence—when the whole American cause was riding on their success, without which all hope for independence would have been dashed and the noble ideals of the Declaration would have amounted to little more than words on paper.

Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, 1776 is a powerful drama written with extraordinary narrative vitality. It is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the King’s men, the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known.

Written as a companion work to his celebrated biography of John Adams, David McCullough’s 1776 is another landmark in the literature of American history.

Topics: United States of America, Massachusetts, New England, Boston, American Revolution, American History, George Washington, Military, War, Founding Fathers, Politics, Thomas Jefferson, and American Government

Published: Simon & Schuster on
ISBN: 9780743287708
List price: $13.99
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brilliant read. easy to read and digest. good work on sourcing the information. more
i would recommend this book to all armchair historians - it's written in a clear, accessible style yet thoroughly backed up with citations for those who wish to explore a certain area further. full disclosure: i have a little crush on david mccollough. he's a handsome man.more
Excellent book about the year the War finally turned in the U.S.'s favor.more
McCullough's book sets for itself a narrow scope, presumably with the intent of focusing a magnifying glass on a time, place, and persons of critical importance to the revolution. He clearly succeeds, but leaves me wanting more.

In 1776, we cover the movements, battles, and decisions of the year, more or less ending with the triumphs of Trenton and Princeton. In the process, we see our first president suffer setbacks and the consequences of poor decisions. The author does a brilliant job of creating literary narrative of historic events and provides us with the details in a colorful way. It is deserving of the awards and praise, but I cannot leave the subject with the smallest of complaint: I wanted more. But perhaps I'm alone in enjoying the massive, thorny texts I do. All readers should enjoy this book greatly!more
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Reviews

brilliant read. easy to read and digest. good work on sourcing the information. more
i would recommend this book to all armchair historians - it's written in a clear, accessible style yet thoroughly backed up with citations for those who wish to explore a certain area further. full disclosure: i have a little crush on david mccollough. he's a handsome man.more
Excellent book about the year the War finally turned in the U.S.'s favor.more
McCullough's book sets for itself a narrow scope, presumably with the intent of focusing a magnifying glass on a time, place, and persons of critical importance to the revolution. He clearly succeeds, but leaves me wanting more.

In 1776, we cover the movements, battles, and decisions of the year, more or less ending with the triumphs of Trenton and Princeton. In the process, we see our first president suffer setbacks and the consequences of poor decisions. The author does a brilliant job of creating literary narrative of historic events and provides us with the details in a colorful way. It is deserving of the awards and praise, but I cannot leave the subject with the smallest of complaint: I wanted more. But perhaps I'm alone in enjoying the massive, thorny texts I do. All readers should enjoy this book greatly!more
History buffs rejoice! This nonfiction account of the first major year of the American Revolution will certainly hit the spot for you. After the United States declared its independence from British rule all hell broke loose. McCullough chronicles the ebb and flow of British power in the states as the battle was fought. I didn't realize that the American army was completely voluntary. The majority of the men were trying to run their farms at the same time. They left their wives and children alone with all the duties on the farm and many of them had to leave the battle front for awhile to return home during harvest time to help their families. Meanwhile the British army they were fighting was made up of trained soldiers with no opportunity to return home.I loved learning about the Americans taking the hill above Boston in the middle of the night. The British woke up and realized they were completely screwed. So much in war depends on chance, to pull that off they had to have the perfect weather and luckily they did! I also learned so much more about George Washington. He was a great leader who had a wonderful ability to instill confidence in soldiers, but he made mistakes just like anyone else. There were so many moments when it looked like America would lose it all. We were the underdogs. The British had well-trained forces and plenty of supplies. We had exhausted farmers with mismatched jackets and a severe lack of food. Somehow a victory with those circumstances is even sweeter. My only complaint is that when it comes to history tomes it’s easier for me to stay connected when the focus falls on one person. One could argue George Washington in the lynch pin in this book, but it’s really about the war as a whole. I always feel like the facts stay with me longer if I see them in the context of one person’s life. I still really enjoyed it, but not quite as much as a straight biography. BOTTOM LINE: If you love history, especially regarding America, then this is for you. It’s well-written, covers fascinating territory and gives a complete picture of just how important that year was in the creation of a brand new nation.  more
David McCullough writes of the ordeals the continental army and their leader went through in 1776. A recount that you could feel the pride and determination these men felt in their drive for independence. The history books we've read from grade school to college provides the details but the author has painted the portrait for all to see and appreciate the magnitude of the events that took place.more
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