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Gin, the albino, marries to escape the confines of an asylum. Toad, a small man who wears corsets, marries to prove his manhood. Together they are freaks—feared and ridiculed by the remote farming community in which they live. Then into their lives come two Italian POWs bringing music, sensuality and a love that will fan the flames of small town bigotry.
Published: Independent Publishers Group on Oct 1, 2010
ISBN: 9781921696411
List price: $12.99
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Gin Boyle, an albino woman, has been saved from a life in a mental hospital by marrying Toad and moving to Wyalkatchem, a small town in Australia on the edge of the desert. Gin’s past is muddy and sad, and her future is not that much better. She and Toad eek out their existence among the rabbits and dust, raising their two young children and living side by side in a loveless marriage. But then, in the middle of World War II, eighteen thousand Italian prisoners of war arrive in Australia – men who are imprisoned by their nationality even though Mussolini has surrendered and they are technically no longer the enemy. Antonio and John arrive on the Toad’s farm, exiles and oddities, and everything will change. We had depended on one another. Nothing more. He had bred the sheep, found the water, lifted the things too heavy to bear. I had prepared food for him, strips of wrinkled bacon, the folded grey nodules of sweetbreads. I had made his clothes, his children, his bed. It wasn’t happiness. It wasn’t love. But it had been tolerable, so long as there was nothing else. – from The Paperbark Shoe, page 241 -Goldie Goldbloom’s breathtaking first novel is narrated in the cynical, observant and damaged voice of Gin, a woman who has lived with rejection her entire life due to her albino condition. She is swamped by poor self worth, and feels ugly and unlovable until Antonio turns his foreign eyes upon her. The Paperbark Shoe is a love story, but it is also a story of what it means to be isolated and searching for identity. It is a story of war, of disconnected lives, of the division between cultures and countries, of bigotry, of loss, and of survival. This novel is remarkable for its depth and for its vivid and striking language.We are isolated, but we do not invite isolation; every stretch of road has its markers for the lost. And the roads themselves have local names, friendlier than the ones given them by government workers who have never seen a fly-blown sheep. There’s the Pig Slurry Stretch and Metholated Mavis’s Gully and Kickastickalong. Every farm has its kerosene tin wedged between two stumps, or its Coolgardie safe on top of a Model T, and the people here say swing left at the kero tin or turn in at the motor and everyone knows what they mean. Antonio has hung a green milking stool from a stringy-bark at our turn-off. Toad’s stool. Toad’s tool. Toadstool. – from The Paperbark Shoe, page 180 -Goldbloom’s imagery is disturbing and at times grotesque. Like watching a train wreck, I found myself unable to look away even while wanting to cover my eyes. Goldbloom’s prose cuts deep, exposing alienation and the far-reaching impact of war. Her characters are survivors. They are largely unlikable. Even the children are deeply flawed. And yet, despite its grim observations and bizarre characters, The Paperbark Shoe is extraordinary.Perhaps most striking, are the characters who people the book. These are misfits, oddities, and outcasts. Toad is short-statured, and struggles with his sexuality while collecting women’s corsets. Despite his weirdness, he is an oddly sympathetic character. Antonio is perhaps the most complex character even though he initially appears one-dimensional. I found myself wondering, does he love Gin? Or is she simply a plaything to make his life in captivity more bearable? Gin’s desire for acceptance is palpable. Her albinism sets her apart from others and she endures ridicule with a hard-edged cynicism.Jouncing past the scalloped fences and the sheep’s skulls nailed to stretcher posts and the long lines of trees planted by the first settlers, I remind myself that God made the land and men made the cities but the devil made small country towns. – from The Paperbark Shoe, page 220 -Goldbloom uses these characters to symbolize those who are different and misunderstood in our society. It is perhaps this theme, of fitting into society vs. being rejected from it, which resonates the loudest in The Paperback Shoe. [...] we are trained from the time we are small to hate the things that are different from us. – from The Paperbark Shoe, page 240 -I found myself deeply entrenched in this novel. It is sad, disturbing and strange…and yet it is beautifully wrought. Goldbloom’s writing in The Paperback Shoe is nearly flawless. Her language is original and imaginative. I challenge anyone to read this novel and not be moved. I turned the final page and audibly sighed. I found myself thinking of the story, mulling over the characters, hours after I finished reading. Many readers will wonder where the beauty is in this novel among the scarred and damaged characters, and the dry and desolate countryside, but I think those most observant will discover that the beauty lies in how the story is told – its honesty and its acute examination of what it means to be different in a society where uniqueness is often perceived as negative.I loved this book. It is one which will stay with me. Goldie Goldbloom is a young author to watch.Highly recommended.read more
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Jenny was late picking a book, she was in Dymocks and this one caught her eye it had a good picture of an Australian veranda on the front. She read the first few pages and liked it. There were vivid descriptions and it was interesting. Didn’t enjoy a couple of the sex scenes. Had to suspend belief a bit. The author chose two extreme people to show Aussie intolerance. Great read, couldn’t put it down.Others:Reminded me of Peter Carey’s writing. P.C’s characters are more believable. Some of G.G’s a bit far fetched!Found it a bit insulting to Australians.Think it is very true to country life and people at that time.Perhaps Gin didn’t go to Italy and it was all part of her mind deteriorating.I’m sure she went.Couldn’t put it down, great descriptions.Terrific sentences worth quoting.Exquisite prose captured how it was to be different.It was too extreme, even the names.Scores out of 10:8,7,9,8,7,8,8,9,8,9,6 = 7.9read more
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A beautifully descriptive book filled with very odd and largely unlikeable characters - the main character is Gin Toad, an albino woman married to a man who met her in an insane asylum. Gin is cultured, plays piano to the highest level and is from a privileged background - yet circumstances have led to her living a life of poverty and backbreaking hard work on a property in Western Australia with her husband (closet homosexual and ladies corset collector) Mr Toad. Into this environment are brought two Italian prisonersof-war - their effect on the Toad family forms the focus of the novel.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Gin Boyle, an albino woman, has been saved from a life in a mental hospital by marrying Toad and moving to Wyalkatchem, a small town in Australia on the edge of the desert. Gin’s past is muddy and sad, and her future is not that much better. She and Toad eek out their existence among the rabbits and dust, raising their two young children and living side by side in a loveless marriage. But then, in the middle of World War II, eighteen thousand Italian prisoners of war arrive in Australia – men who are imprisoned by their nationality even though Mussolini has surrendered and they are technically no longer the enemy. Antonio and John arrive on the Toad’s farm, exiles and oddities, and everything will change. We had depended on one another. Nothing more. He had bred the sheep, found the water, lifted the things too heavy to bear. I had prepared food for him, strips of wrinkled bacon, the folded grey nodules of sweetbreads. I had made his clothes, his children, his bed. It wasn’t happiness. It wasn’t love. But it had been tolerable, so long as there was nothing else. – from The Paperbark Shoe, page 241 -Goldie Goldbloom’s breathtaking first novel is narrated in the cynical, observant and damaged voice of Gin, a woman who has lived with rejection her entire life due to her albino condition. She is swamped by poor self worth, and feels ugly and unlovable until Antonio turns his foreign eyes upon her. The Paperbark Shoe is a love story, but it is also a story of what it means to be isolated and searching for identity. It is a story of war, of disconnected lives, of the division between cultures and countries, of bigotry, of loss, and of survival. This novel is remarkable for its depth and for its vivid and striking language.We are isolated, but we do not invite isolation; every stretch of road has its markers for the lost. And the roads themselves have local names, friendlier than the ones given them by government workers who have never seen a fly-blown sheep. There’s the Pig Slurry Stretch and Metholated Mavis’s Gully and Kickastickalong. Every farm has its kerosene tin wedged between two stumps, or its Coolgardie safe on top of a Model T, and the people here say swing left at the kero tin or turn in at the motor and everyone knows what they mean. Antonio has hung a green milking stool from a stringy-bark at our turn-off. Toad’s stool. Toad’s tool. Toadstool. – from The Paperbark Shoe, page 180 -Goldbloom’s imagery is disturbing and at times grotesque. Like watching a train wreck, I found myself unable to look away even while wanting to cover my eyes. Goldbloom’s prose cuts deep, exposing alienation and the far-reaching impact of war. Her characters are survivors. They are largely unlikable. Even the children are deeply flawed. And yet, despite its grim observations and bizarre characters, The Paperbark Shoe is extraordinary.Perhaps most striking, are the characters who people the book. These are misfits, oddities, and outcasts. Toad is short-statured, and struggles with his sexuality while collecting women’s corsets. Despite his weirdness, he is an oddly sympathetic character. Antonio is perhaps the most complex character even though he initially appears one-dimensional. I found myself wondering, does he love Gin? Or is she simply a plaything to make his life in captivity more bearable? Gin’s desire for acceptance is palpable. Her albinism sets her apart from others and she endures ridicule with a hard-edged cynicism.Jouncing past the scalloped fences and the sheep’s skulls nailed to stretcher posts and the long lines of trees planted by the first settlers, I remind myself that God made the land and men made the cities but the devil made small country towns. – from The Paperbark Shoe, page 220 -Goldbloom uses these characters to symbolize those who are different and misunderstood in our society. It is perhaps this theme, of fitting into society vs. being rejected from it, which resonates the loudest in The Paperback Shoe. [...] we are trained from the time we are small to hate the things that are different from us. – from The Paperbark Shoe, page 240 -I found myself deeply entrenched in this novel. It is sad, disturbing and strange…and yet it is beautifully wrought. Goldbloom’s writing in The Paperback Shoe is nearly flawless. Her language is original and imaginative. I challenge anyone to read this novel and not be moved. I turned the final page and audibly sighed. I found myself thinking of the story, mulling over the characters, hours after I finished reading. Many readers will wonder where the beauty is in this novel among the scarred and damaged characters, and the dry and desolate countryside, but I think those most observant will discover that the beauty lies in how the story is told – its honesty and its acute examination of what it means to be different in a society where uniqueness is often perceived as negative.I loved this book. It is one which will stay with me. Goldie Goldbloom is a young author to watch.Highly recommended.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Jenny was late picking a book, she was in Dymocks and this one caught her eye it had a good picture of an Australian veranda on the front. She read the first few pages and liked it. There were vivid descriptions and it was interesting. Didn’t enjoy a couple of the sex scenes. Had to suspend belief a bit. The author chose two extreme people to show Aussie intolerance. Great read, couldn’t put it down.Others:Reminded me of Peter Carey’s writing. P.C’s characters are more believable. Some of G.G’s a bit far fetched!Found it a bit insulting to Australians.Think it is very true to country life and people at that time.Perhaps Gin didn’t go to Italy and it was all part of her mind deteriorating.I’m sure she went.Couldn’t put it down, great descriptions.Terrific sentences worth quoting.Exquisite prose captured how it was to be different.It was too extreme, even the names.Scores out of 10:8,7,9,8,7,8,8,9,8,9,6 = 7.9
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A beautifully descriptive book filled with very odd and largely unlikeable characters - the main character is Gin Toad, an albino woman married to a man who met her in an insane asylum. Gin is cultured, plays piano to the highest level and is from a privileged background - yet circumstances have led to her living a life of poverty and backbreaking hard work on a property in Western Australia with her husband (closet homosexual and ladies corset collector) Mr Toad. Into this environment are brought two Italian prisonersof-war - their effect on the Toad family forms the focus of the novel.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
In A Room of One's Own Virginia Woolf urged women to write books "adapted to the body." A lot of feminist literary theorists (Irigarary, Cixous, Kristeva, to name a very few) have investigated what a writing of the female and/or feminine body might be. And some novelists have given us beautiful examples of it, as Woolf herself did, as Gloria Naylor does, and as Goldie Goldbloom does here. Whatever else Goldbloom's book is, it's a gorgeous, seductive writing through the body.The book's protagonist, Gin, and her husband both experience the world through their bodies, constantly aware of themselves as albino (her) and small, ugly, and possibly transgendered (him). When they see things or do things, they're seeing, doing as people trapped in their antipathetic bodies. And we, readers of this mostly first-person narrative, experience the book similarly, through how things look, feel, taste to Gin. Even the land is meaningful -- salty, dry, deadly, fertile -- to her and to us in a way that echoes the desiring, suffering, sensual body. The book takes place during World War II, a time when the materiality of bodies was of high consequence, allowing the plot to beautifully entwine with the narrative method. The plot is strong and involving, as other reviewers have noted. The last 20 or so pages feel tacked on, but I only noticed this belatedly, so seductive is Goldbloom's writing. (Spoiler alert!!!!!) And it's perhaps this seduction that's the most interesting part of the book, for it wasn't until I'd nearly finished that I realized how much living inside Gin had blinded me (and her) to how utterly monstrous she became.
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Recently published in the US, this debut novel was winner of the 2008 AWP Award for the Novel in Australia (Association of Writers and Writing Programs). Not at all what I expected, this powerful novel tells the story of Gin, an albino woman born in Australia and feared as some sort of witch by all who knew her. She found solace in the piano, and became a virtuoso player, but through a series of ugly circumstances, found herself incarcerated in an insane asylum.Enter Toad, a small slightly mishappen man, who collects ladies corsets, but who after hearing her playing, marries her and takes her to his sheep farm in the wilds of Western Australia. From here the story blossoms as Gin and Toad bond with two Italian POWs (one of whom is a shoemaker) who have been assigned to work on their farm.This is a beautifully written, yet disturbing love story. At the same time it is a story of poverty, drought, beauty, ugliness, perversion, mother love, and unmet needs both physical and pscychological. I was mesmerized, chilled, depressed, and gladdened by the story, by the writing, by the setting. It is a chapter in World War II history that I wasn't too aware of, and I had never considered the discrimination toward albinos that occurred. It certainly isn't a warm and fuzzy book, but it is one that packs a lot of emotion.I have left out many details here, because this book needs to be experienced, and its nuances and plot twists discovered along the way. There is not a huge involved plot--it is simply the story of four people plodding along, trying to stay alive and make it to the end of the war--but the setting and the characters and their interaction to each other and reactions to the setting really drive the story. It is one that will haunt the reader for a long time. A compelling and satisfying read.
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Got this book in a giveaway - The story is told from the perspective of Gin Toad, an albino woman, living in Australia during WWII with her husband and two Italian POWs. Not something that I would normally pick up but I must say that I did enjoy it. It was an original spin on a war time "love story" with a cast of fabulously odd characters. I will warn though, definitely not a feel good book, but worth reading.
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