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From the Publisher

Few writers have had a more demonstrable impact on the development of  the modern world than has Karl Marx (1818-1883). Born in Trier into a  middle-class Jewish family in 1818, by the time of his death in London  in 1883, Marx claimed a growing international reputation.



Of central importance then and later was his book Das Kapital, or, as it is known to English readers, simply Capital. Volume One of Capital  was published in Paris in 1867 and is included in this edition. This  was the only volume published during Marx’s lifetime and the only to  have come directly from his pen. Volume Two, available as a separate  Wordsworth eBook, was published in 1884, and was based on notes Marx  left, but written by his friend and collaborator, Friedrich Engels  (1820-1895).



Readers from the nineteenth century to the present have been captivated  by the unmistakable power and urgency of this classic of world  literature. Marx’s critique of the capitalist system is rife with big  themes: his theory of ‘surplus value’, his discussion of the  exploitation of the working class, and his forecast of class conflict on  a grand scale. Marx wrote with purpose. As he famously put it,  ‘Philosophers have previously tried to explain the world, our task is to  change it.’

Published: Wordsworth Editions an imprint of Vearsa Limited on
ISBN: 9781848705630
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