You are on page 1of 16

1

Austin / Galewood
Sustainability
Roadmap
November 1, 2013
D R A F T


2


Table of Contents



































Letter from Ward 29 Alderman Deborah Graham 3
Sustainability Roadmap Process 3
Austin History 4
Austin Assets 5
Action Teams

Economic
I Jobs and Industry
6
II Healthy Businesses 7
III Transportation 9
Social
IV Youth
10
V Education 11
VI Cultural Resources 12
Environmental
VII Peace and Safety
13
VIII Community Beautification 14
What is a Sustainable Community? 15
Acknowledgments 16
3



F R OM T HE AL DE R MAN
Our community urgently needs a comprehensive economic development strategy that can not only be
attractive to investors but also honor the concerns and priorities of our community.
We don’t need a top-down plan developed and imposed on the residents. Instead we need a grassroots,
community-driven process to yield a plan that everyone can feel deeply invested in and committed to - that
has the community heartbeat at the center.
That is why I convened this community planning dialogue - to launch a process to give voice to the hopes and
dreams of neighbors and residents and identify our shared priorities.
Thank you for joining in this process of re-imagining our community.
We will be celebrating Austin’s 150th Anniversary in 2015. In anticipation, I am looking forward to working with
you throughout 2014 to move Austin forward with this roadmap as we realize our dreams and recommended
actions for a more sustainable future.
Alderman Deborah Graham

Sustainability Roadmap Process
September - November 2013
Session I: VISIONING The first community gathering to create an Austin Sustainability Roadmap to foster
healthy business districts and neighborhoods was convened at the Columbus Park Refectory September 4,
2013, One hundred residents talked about their hopes and dreams for the future of the Ward and community
answering, “What do you want to see in place by 2015? What are the values that are behind this vision? What
do you imagine would make this community more economically, environmentally and socially sustainable?”
Session II: RECOMMENDED ACTIONS At the Shriners Hospitals for Children October 2nd, residents self-
selected the topic they had most passion about implementing from the vision. They considered how they
could support Austin assets and potential actions to realize their vision.
Two representatives from each of the eight areas met October 23rd at the North Avenue Branch Library to
review the draft and envision action planning and implementation in 2014.
Session III: REPORTING Reports were given of the eight action areas to community residents at Session III.
The goal is to start implementing the Sustainability Roadmap in 2014, to realize a healthier and more resilient
community.
4
Institute of Cultural Affairs (ICA) Facilitation
Nina Winn, ICA Accelerate 77 Coordinator, and Karen Snyder, ICA Associate, facilitated the launch of the
“Austin Sustainability Roadmap”. The ICA, an international non-profit, is involved in community development
and organizational change.
Celebrating its 50th anniversary, ICA is now in Year III Accelerate 77, identifying, connecting, and accelerating
sustainability in Chicago's 77 communities.
ICA’s processes integrate economic, social and environmental community dynamics. By working with local
citizens within a delimited geography, the citizens are encouraged to deal holistically with the communities’
structures, look for ways to circulate money within the community, create symbols and stories, and deal with
the depth human issue. By catalyzing small steps, residents find they have their power to make a difference in
the changes they identify.
Community thinking that is broad and inclusive allows a systems-based approach to implementation to
emerge. Integrated into the community roadmap are Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) (by John
McKnight and Jody Kretzmann at Northwestern University) and Appreciative Inquiry (by Dr. David Cooperrider
at Case Western University).

Austin History
Austin was founded in 1865 by Henry W. Austin, who purchased 470-acres for the purpose of having home
ownership, public amenities such as tree-lined parkways, and gracious living.
Thanks in part to some of the best commuter services in Chicago, Austin grew rapidly, attracting Germans,
Scandinavians, Irish, Italians and Greeks. By 1920 Austin was one of Chicago's best-served commuter areas, with
street railways to downtown Chicago every half mile. The area was also served by the Lake Street “L” rapid
transit. Commerce in Austin followed transit lines, with significant business development along Madison Street,
Chicago Avenue, and Lake Street.
The Austin Town Hall was constructed in 1929, modeled on Philadelphia's Independence Hall. Austin's crown
jewel was Columbus Park. Designed in a prairie mode by renowned landscape architect Jens Jensen, the park
featured a lagoon, a golf course, athletic fields, winding paths, a refectory overlooking the lagoon, and a
swimming pool. The park was extensively restored in 1992.
Dense housing development almost completely supplanted the village landscape of large frame homes in the
early twentieth century. Added since then have been brick two and three-flats, small frame houses, bungalows,
row houses, corner apartment blocks, and courtyard apartment buildings.
In the 1960-1970s African Americans immigrated into the community drawn by the employment opportunities of
the surrounding industries of Zenith, Western Electric, Sears, International Harvester and three candy companies.
Since the 1980s, these industries have closed, resulting in rising unemployment and crime, declining home
ownership and property values, and the shrinking of the retail sector.
Austin is now the largest community in Chicago in terms of geography and its population of some 100,000
people with 90% African American. The median age in Austin is 29.5 (city average 31.5). The median
household income is $33,663 (city average $43,223) with 24.1% living in poverty. In June 2013 four Chicago
public schools elementary schools were closed: Armstrong, Emmett, Key and May.
In the midst of multiple challenges, residents value the community housing, transit options and being a close-
knit with their neighbors.

5

Austin Community Assets
This list, originally compiled by Field Museum staff that wrote the 2011Austin report, will be continuously updated
throughout the Sustainability Roadmap process.
Businesses
- Allce's 8esLauranL
- Channlng's Chlldcare
- Colden SLarL uaycare
- lmpress urban Wear
- LemlngLon loods
- MacArLhur's 8esLauranL
- Cuench 8esLauranL
- uncle 8emus 8esLauranL
- Wal-MarL

Community Organizations
• AusLln Afrlcan Amerlcan 8uslness
neLworklng AssoclaLlon
• AusLln Career LducaLlon CenLer
• AusLln Chlldcare Þrovlders
neLwork
• AusLln Comlng 1ogeLher (AC1)
• AusLln CommunlLy MlnlsLry
• AusLln lamlly Counsellng CenLer
• AusLln Þeoples AcLlon CenLer
(AÞAC)
• AusLln SafeLy neL Works (ASnW)
• AusLln ?MCA
• 8eLhel new Llfe
• ChlldServ
• Clrcle urban MlnlsLrles
• CommunlLy SupporL Advlsory
Councll (SCAC)
• Lyes on AusLln
• lerrer loundaLlon
• lresh Moves
• Cood ClLy
• CreaLer AusLln uevelopmenL
AssoclaLlon
• Love loundaLlon
Þhalanx lamlly Servlces
• Þower Þeace 8lock Club
• Sankofa CulLural ArLs and
8uslness CenLer
• Shrlner's PosplLals for Chlldren
• SouLh AusLln CoallLlon
CommunlLy Councll (SACCC)
• van 8uren SLreeL 8lock Clubs
• WesLslde ArL Space
• WesLslde PealLh AuLhorlLy (WPA)
• WesLslde PlsLorlcal SocleLy
• WesLslde MlnlsLers CoallLlon
• ?ouLh CuLreach Servlces

Gardens
• AusLln Creen 1eam
• 81's Carden
• kneedland's Carden
• LaClalre Carden
• Memorlal Carden
• Þaradlse Carden
• Þeace ln Lhe valley Carden
• 8ooL 8loL Parambee Carden
• SerenlLy Carden
• unlLy Carden

Government Agencies
- 8Lh ulsLrlcL SLaLe 8epresenLaLlve
LaShawn lord
- 13Lh ulsLrlcL Þollce SLaLlon
- 2.8Lh Ward Alderman !ason
lrvln's Cfflce
- 29Lh Ward Alderman ueborah
Craham's Cfflce
- 37Lh Ward Alderman Lmma MlLss'
Cfflce
- AusLln SaLelllLe Senlor CenLer
- CAÞS
- Chlcago ueparLmenL of Pouslng
- Chlcago Þubllc Llbrary - AusLln
and norLh Avenue 8ranches
- C1A 8lue and Creen Llnes
- ueparLmenL of Puman Servlces
- SLreeLs and SanlLaLlon

Health
- AusLln lamlly PealLh CenLer (ÞCC
Wellness CenLer)
- Clrcle lamlly PealLh Care
neLwork
- LorreLLo PosplLal
- SL. Anne's PosplLal of Chlcago
- WesLslde PealLh AuLhorlLy
" WesL Suburban PosplLal

Green Building
- 8eLhel new Llfe CenLer
- AusLln lamlly healLh CenLer
" ÞLACL Corner ?ouLh CenLer


Local Media
• AusLln1alks
• AusLln volce
• AusLln Weekly news
• Þrogress llllnols

Public Parks/Natural Areas
• AusLln 1own Pall Þark and
CulLural CenLer
• Clark Þark
• Columbus Þark
• La loleLLe Þark
• Levln Þark
• 8lls Þark

Religious
• lrlendshlp 8apLlsL Church
• CreaLer SL. !ohn 8lble Church
• Pelrs of Lhe Þromlse Church
• new MounL Þllgrlm Mlsslonary
8apLlsL Church
• SL. Angela Church

Schools
• Academy of ScholasLlc
AchlevemenL
• AusLln 8uslness and
LnLrepreneurshlp Academy
• AusLln ÞolyLechnlcal Academy
• CaLalysL Clrcle 8ock CharLer
• ChrlsL Lhe klng !esulL College
ÞreparaLory School
• lrederlck uouglass Academy Plgh
School
• Powe LlemenLary School
• Mlchelle Clark Plgh School
• MllLon 8runson MaLh & Sclence
SpeclalLy School
• nash LlemenLary
• ÞlaLo Learnlng Academy
• Spencer 1echnlcal Academy
• SL. Angela School
• SL. Þaul LuLheran School
• vClSL Academy Plgh School
• WesLslde AlLernaLlve Plgh School
• WesLslde PollsLlc Leadershlp
Academy
6
ACTION TEAM I
Reweaving the Economic Fabric
Jobs and Industry

Background
There were significant industrial corridors, including the current Pulaski Industrial Corridor, to the North, East,
and South. In 1950 Austin was a predominantly residential community, with major industrial corridors to the
east, north, and south.

Vision
• Jobs here
• Rethink industrial land use
• No vacant lots
• Training Center
• Economic loans for commercial and
residential developments
• Professional services
• Improved upkeep of abandoned buildings
vacant facilities for businesses and job
training
• Regional dollars spent in Austin in a
planned business district
• Well planned training and mentoring
and accountability for performance
and results
• Theater and arts district

Community Assets
• Business development resources
• Community newspapers
• Commercial streets and industrial districts
• Transportation

Recommended Actions
1. Link and collaborate among business development resources and workforce training
organizations
2. Get the word out through different media
3. Schedule more frequent planning meeting
4. Research to bring information to the community

The Reweaving the Economic Fabric Team
* Haskin, Stacy (& J.Todd) Slhaskin15E@yahoo.com 312.213.7370 (cell)
* Kato, Barbara BarbaraKato@yahoo.com 773. 745.7048
* Thomas, Yvonne ytom_7@yahoo.com 773.921.0116
* Todd, Jonathan (& S.Haskin) jtoddchicago@gmail.com 773.419.8633

Austin, Marvin B. maustin@bethelnewlife.org 773.473.7870
Bell, Olivia olbellconsulting@gmail.com 773.816.7292
Ford, Seamus
www.root-riot.com Seamus.ford@gmail.com 312.213.7824
Shields, Darnell
5049 West Harrison
Watts, Michael MchlWtts@aol.com 773.287.6968 home; 773.209.9619 cell
Williams, Randolph 123 South Waller Avenue 773.707.5311 Real Estate
Your Training for Youth
7
ACTION TEAM II
The Better Business Boosters
Healthy Businesses
Background
Major employers in Austin are education, health, social, manufacturing, and retail services plus small
restaurant and childcare businesses. Austin Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified
buildings now include the Austin Family Health Center, Bethel New Life’s Bethel Center, and Peace Corner.

Vision
An overarching aspect of having healthy businesses in the community is to help spur local job creation and
keep money flowing within the community. This may include
• Insuring quality food stores (e.g., full service grocery)
• Revitalizing business districts with improvements along North and Chicago Avenues (e.g., a drug store,
quality businesses, streetscaping and dealing with dilapidated buildings and vacant/abandoned
properties)
• Focusing planning and input on attracting new businesses.
• Look at Forest Park as a model on North Avenue taking what works west of Harlem and translate East of
Harlem.
• Streamlining the process for obtaining new business permits/licenses making it easier to own a business, but
not too easy
• Enabling walkable business accessibility (e.g., pedestrian safety with traffic calming enabling people to
walk to shop and making busy streets more pedestrian-friendly instead of high speed traffic)
• Setting up small business incubators

Community Assets
• Positive demographics (income, population)
• Parks and recreation facilities (Austin Town Hall, Columbus Park)
• Community organizations (e.g., job training)
• Available properties (vacancies)
• Population density

Recommended Actions
1. Open new lines of communication with businesses and community groups
2. Make community a destination to shop and live
3. Emulate successes of other communities. Work across boundaries of neighborhoods within Austin (e.g.,
Galewood, North and South Austin)
4. Increase community input re zoning and businesses. Ensure zoning code enforcement of liquor and grocery
stores (Be careful about allowing certain businesses to call themselves ‘grocery stores’).
5. Centralize information source on available properties
6. Strengthen local chambers and improve communication between them
7. Create business district destinations (e.g., Uptown has become a music destination) and hold special
events to attract visitors
8. Strengthen existing businesses (e.g., beautifying building facades, limiting window sign, and improving
accessibility to businesses with increased parking)
9. Encourage business owners to live in the community
10. Plan and recruit desirable businesses
11. Offer healthy affordable fruits and vegetables and healthy cooking classes
12. Do traffic count of North Avenue, Chicago Avenue, Madison and Harlem


8
The Better Business Boosters Team
Alexander, Judith opfolk@comcast.net 708.772.3702
Graber, Joe
1205 North Harvey, Oak Park (302) opfolk@comcast.net 708.386.7174
Stelletello,Robert Bob@rahoakpark.net 773.237.2275
Bibbs, Rebecca loganhendricksmedia@yahoo.com
Casaccio, Ken 5467 West Madison Street 773.533.4900
Cherif, Rosetta 1656 North Normandy 773.251.6797
Corna, Sal scorna@sbcglobal.net
Holifield, Faith Aldi’s 5629 West Fillmore 773.473.0319
Jones, Sharon Dreamscents40@yahoo.com 773.294.0879
McDermott, Joey 1929 North Natoma 773.343.5639
Moth, Yescenia, City of Chicago CDCASE 312,744.0565
Van Note, Allen avannote@gmail.com 708.785.6035




9
ACTION TEAM III
The Safety Transportation Advisory
Transportation

Vision
• Metra train stop
• Bus lines that run at night
• Transit oriented communities
• Pedestrian friendly (North Avenue dangerous)
• DIVVY bike stations
• Parking for residents that residents feel safe to walk, bike and use transit
• Frequent and reliable transit services that serve all users including night workers
• Improved infrastructure for more active and livable community
• Bicycle lanes
Community Assets
• Outstanding public transportation access with Metra, Blue and Green Lines
• Westside Health Authority
• Building Healthier Chicago
• CLOCC
• CAPS

Recommended Actions
1. Reduce car travel speed on North Avenue
2. Install countdown pedestrian timer on North Avenue
3. Restripe crosswalks on North Avenue (high visibility)
4. Extend hours of Austin bus operations
5. More lighting on bus stops
6. Add more Westside stops on Metra Pacific Westline between Kedzie and Oak Park
7. Extend protected bike lanes on Lake Street
8. Add DIVVY stations
9. Pedestrian shopping for North Avenue


The Safety Transportation Advisory Team

Bell, Cynthia
Active Transportation Alliance Community Liaison Cynthia@activetrans.org 312.427.3325, ex. 244

Clay, Bernard B_clay@sbcglobal.net 773.261.6734
Gibson, Herman Hagibson2ymail.com 773.921.4469


10
ACTION TEAM IV
The V.I.P.s:
Vision, Integrity and Purpose
Youth
Background
Community centers are valuable assets for youth programs that include sports, exercise, wellness education
and health screenings. Environmental programs centered on youth steer them from negative social
influences to promoting positive character development, healthier eating, nutrition, benefits of physical
activity, and making education more engaging.
Vision
The vision for youth is to expand access to job opportunities and adult role models, as well as establish
more youth spaces/centers for gathering and engagement (e.g., service projects).
Community Assets
• Chicago Park District
• Job Corps
• Lincoln’s Challenge Academy
• Sports Care Center
• West Cook YMCA
• Year Up
Recommended Actions
1. Develop a community mapping
2. Identify youth leaders
3. Create training opportunities
4. Create a survey for the youth (Cassandra)
5. Create a youth summit
6. Create outreach teams for youth
7. Identify a safe location and resources needed
8. Expand male and female adult mentors (Shelley Cooper)
9. Network with high schools
10. Identify areas of peer pressure
11. Bring the youth to the table to talk
12. Identify youth organizations in the community and find out what is available in each
program
The V.I.P. Team
* Davis, Terri tdavis@primocenter.org 773.425.1760
* James, Gwen Gwenjames001@gmail.com 312.550.3034
Achre, Christine cachre@primocenter.org 312.385.0566
Cooper, Shelley Scooper@primocenter.org 312.385.0565
Dudley, Carla cdudley@primocenter.org 312.510.6529
Elem, Gary Gary_a_elem@yahoo.com 773.876.1460
Ellis, Cassandra Eteam60@aol.com 773.744.7336
Kimble, Ruth Quilan3@prodigy.net 773.379.7627
Murphy, Mary marymurphyshi@gmail.com 773.287.4168
Myles, Randy Rdm8388@gmail.com 773.712.4556
Truss, Cata Cata_truss@sbcglobal.net 773.879.4460
11
ACTION TEAM V
The Golden Key
Education
Background
Austin has the largest student population of any Chicago community. In the past ten years many changes
have been happening in education in the community, particularly with the Chicago public schools. During
Chicago Public School’s (CPS) Renaissance 2010 period (2000-2010), the Austin Community Academy High
School was closed, rehabbed and replaced with three small schools: Austin Business and Entrepreneurship
Academy, Austin Polytechnical Academy and Voise Academy (a virtual high school). In August 2011 the
Austin Community Action Council (CAC) submitted a report to CPS about residents’ desires to improve
education in Austin. In 2010 and 2011 Austin students increasing reading and math scores outpaced
students in any other Chicago community. This resulted in shifting students not meeting expectations from
60% to 67.4% meeting expectations by 2011. However, with the decreasing number of students attending
CPS schools (7,610 students were attending CPS out of 11,839), four elementary schools were closed in 2013.
Vision
The educational vision is to ensure excellence in Austin formal and informal educational structures through:
• Improving the quality of schools by supporting the staff and local school councils
• Insuring schools provide modern technology
• Offering parents school choices for their children
• Training parents in teaching
• Encouraging Austin businesses and schools to work together
Community Assets
Educational assets include the concerns and relationships among community residents interested in
ensuring quality education, the land resources surrounding the schools as well as the vacated buildings of
the four schools closed in June.

Recommended Actions
1. Inventory Austin’s educational assets (e.g., businesses, schools, park districts,
stakeholders) and monitor their progress
2. Support ‘high performing schools’
3. Assist schools in strengthening their LSCs
4. Build relationships with all stakeholders
5. Increase using libraries and park districts

The Golden Key Team
* Cross, Denise Crossfamily220@gmail.com 773.490.8540
* Wiley, Mildred mwiley@bethelnewlife.org 773.473.7870
Ellis, Debra Drellis_ute@hotmail.com 773.266.2744
Lalagos, Thomas tlalagos@gmail.com 773.456.2961
Terrell, JoAnne E Jterrell718@yahoo.com 773.431.6030
Travis, Donnita Donnita.travis@bythehand.org 312.305.2622


12
ACTION TEAM VI
The Cultured Crew
Cultural Resources
Background
The vision is to ensure the development of the arts, culture and heritage of the community in order to learn
from the past to build a better community future. Beginnings of representing its African American history are
known with Benny Goodman’s jazz career and murals depicting themes of Chicago, African influences,
and African American and South African civil rights struggles. Cultural events like the annual Green Team
Tour and Juneteenth Festival play a key role in building positive community images.
Vision
The vision emphasis here is to create destination points that represent community markers to develop
community pride and positive feelings about the community. The conversation revolved around creating
destination points such as:

designating an African-American business district (like Chinatown, Greektown, Little Italy)


designing a nature center with community garden where students could give volunteer hours


establishing a blues center or concert center utilizing local artists like Muddy Waters son


displaying public works of art (e.g., murals, Black History monuments)


organizing a Community Arts Council to implement ideas


finding ways to rehearse old fashioned values and principles


recognizing that our cultural assets influence our becoming a neighborhood of choice

Community Assets
• Amundsen Park
• Austin Green Team
• Austin Townhall
• Columbus Park
• Gardens
• Libraries
• Rutherford Sayre Park
• Sankofa Cultural Arts Center

Recommended Actions
1. Formation of Community Arts Council
2. Take a full inventory of Austin’s resources, e.g., parks, libraries, schools, gardens
3. Create a Website with a social networking page for the community
4. Creation of public art

The Cultured Crew
* Crawford, Malcolm aaabna@yahoo.com 773.626.4497
* Drebenstedt, Tom chilstedt@sbcglobal.net 773.909.0899
* Logan, Lilangel Llogan1616@gmail.com 312.965.9479
Davis, Marcel Marcel.davis@gmail.com 773.390.3367
Martinez, Sergio angelheart@ameritech.net 773.237.1667
Rojele, Ewa ejarojek@sbcglobal.net 773.805.2533


13
ACTION TEAM VII
The Righteous Warriors
Peace and Safety
Vision
The vision to have a walkable community where people feel safe and at peace with one another can
practically be seen as vacant property is repaired or torn down, more police patrol the streets preventing
drug activities and loitering, business owners care for their property, and more residents participate in CAP
meetings and neighborhood watches.
Community Assets
• Working with the alderman and beat sergeant
• Religious organizations (churches)
• Street and Sanitation (Ward Super)
• Troubled building officers

Recommended Actions
1. Ward superintendent involved with blocks
2. Neighborhood businesses to keep area clean
3. Increase policing to improve public safety, enforcing no loitering in front of businesses
and fewer signs in front of businesses
4. Hold landlords and owners accountable for their tenants
5. Increase resident attendance at CAPS meetings, Alderman meetings, and get to
know CAPS officers
6. Work with local businesses
7. Religious organizations (churches) more active
8. Increase use of underutilized facilities (e.g., Austin Town Hall and YMCA)

The Righteous Warriors
* Davis, Richard Richardd606@comcast.net 773.339.7815
* Gibson Sims, Patricia patann5937@aol.com 773.612.5616
Ferber, Richard 773.627.2948
Hillsman, Juanetta E. 773.626.8424
Lewis, Sernetha 773.378.8003
McGee Sanders, Annie 773.626.1462
McGee Sanders, Stephanie 773.626.1462
Spencer, Barbara



14
ACTION TEAM VIII
Allure!
Sharing Our Vision: The Journey to Aesthetic Community
Community Beautification
Background
Austin organizations and residents concerned with enhancing the community's image and building
solidarity among community residents see beautification as key to community building. through activities
like community cleanups, mural painting, and community gardening.
Vision
The Beautification vision journey to being an aesthetic community can be instilled through community pride
with block by block beautification throughout Austin, for example, adding more trees with regular tree
trimming, having cleaner streets and alleys, increasing community gardens and developing rain gardens,
painting murals under viaducts, and scheduling community and block cleanups.
Community Assets
• Alderman
• Austin Green Team
• Block Clubs
• Bureau of Forestry Churches
• Fire department
• Galewood community organizations
• Law enforcement
• Library
• Neighborhood businesses
• Shriner’s Hospital for Children
• Ward superintendent

Recommended Actions
1. Organize block clubs
2. Attend community meetings
3. Partner with schools, churches, businesses and neighbors
4. Publicize what is happening in the parks and connect them better
5. Share the vision
6. Be open minded
7. Actively participate in creating community buy-in
8. Track and evaluate progress
9. Communicate regularly
10. Celebrate accomplishments

The Allure Team
* Emerson, Telisha missemerson@yahoo.com 773.793.7950
* Page, Ideria Ipage1759@gmail.com 773.237.6446
Gardner, Mary Mary5930@comcast.net 773.729.8763
Osarado, Sid Sid.osarado@cityofchicago.org 312.744.0344
15
What is a Sustainable Community?

The path to sustainability is different for every community – but the common elements are
a healthy environment,
a strong economy, and
the well-being of the people living in the community.

When sustainability areas are addressed in tandem with each other, they have a powerful, positive effect on
the quality of life and future of a community. By overlapping work in these areas, efficiencies emerge and
better results are achieved. It’s an approach that solves local problems while being innovative about
progress. The characteristics of a sustainable community include
1
:

THINKS AND ACTS SYSTEMICALLY INSTILLS RESILIENCY FOSTERS INNOVATION
REDEFINES PROGRESS LIVES WITHIN MEANS CULTIVATES COLLABORATION
ENSURES EQUITY EMBRACES DIVERSITY INSPIRES LEADERSHIP
CONTINUOUSLY IMPROVES

#$%& '()*+ ),- ./0123451+

Built
Environment
Climate and
Energy
Economy
and Jobs
Education,
Arts and
Community
Equity and
Empowerment
Health and
Safety
Natural
Systems
• Ambient
noise and
light
• Community
water systems
• Compact
and
complete
communities’
• Housing
affordability
• Infill and
redevelop-
ment
• Public spaces
• Transportation
choices
• Climate
adaptation
• Greenhouse
gas
mitigation
• Greening the
energy
supply
• Industrial
sector
resource
efficiency
• Resource
efficient
buildings
• Resource
efficient
public
infrastructure
• Waste
minimization

• Business
retention
and
develop-
ment
• Green
market
develop-
ment
• Local
economy
• Quality jobs
and living
wages
• Targeted
industry
develop-
ment
• Workforce
readiness
• Arts and
culture
• Community
cohesion
• Educational
opportunity
and
attainment
• Historic
preservation
• Social and
cultural
diversity
• Civic
engagement
• Civil and
human rights
• Environmental
justice
• Equitable
services and
access
• Human
services
• Poverty
prevention
and
alleviation
• Active living
• Community
health and
health
system
• Emergency
prevention
and
response
• Food access
and nutrition
• Indoor air
quality
• Natural and
human
hazards
• Safe
communities
• Green
infrastructure
• Invasive
species
natural
resource
protection
• Outdoor air
quality
• Water in the
environment
• Working
lands




1
Edited from the Sustainability Tools for Assessing and Rating Communities (STAR). For further elaboration on
characteristics go to www.starcommunities.org.
16
Acknowledgments
Thank you for your assistance in designing Austin’s Sustainability Roadmap. Other sources mentioned in this
documentation are from news articles, reports, and websites.


The Better Business
Boosters
Reweaving the Economic
Fabric of the Community
The Safety
Transportation Advisory
* Judith Alexander
* Joe Graber
* Robert Stelletello
Rebecca Bibbs
Ken Casaccio
Rosetta Cherif
Sal Corna
Faith Holifield
Sharon Jones
Joey McDermott
Yescenia Moth
Allen Van Note
* Stacy Haskin
* Barbara Kato
* Yvonne Thomas
* Jonathan Todd

Marvin Austin
Olivia Bell
Seamus Ford
Darnell Shields
Michael Watts
Randolph Williams
* Cynthia Bell

Bernard Clay
Herman Gibson
Allure! Sharing Our Vision:
The Journey to Aesthetic Community
The Righteous Warriors
* Telisha Emerson
* Ideria Page

Mary Gardner
Sid Osarado
* Richard Davis
* Patricia Gibson Sims
Willa Ferba
Juanetta Hillsman
Seretha Lewis
Annie McGee Sander
Stephanie McGee Sanders
Barbara Spencer
The Golden Key The V.I.P.s
Vision, Integrity and Purpose
The Cultured Crew
* Denise Cross
* Mildred Wiley

Debra Ellis
Thomas Lalagos
Joanne Terrell
Donnita Travis
* Terri Davis
* Gwen James
Christine Achre
Shelley Cooper
Carla Dudley
Gary Elem
Cassandra Ellis
Ruth Kimble
Mary Murphy
Randy Myles
Cata Truss
* Malcolm
Crawford
* Tom Drebenstedt
* Lilangel Logan

Marcel Davis
Sergio Martinez
Ewa Rojele