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Great G L Y P H S

Neighborhood &
Community
12 Skill-Building Activities That Motivate Kids to Collect,
Display, and Use Dataand Connect to the NCTM Standards
by Patricia Daly

NEW YORK TORONTO LONDON AUCKLAND SYDNEY


MEXICO CITY NEW DELHI HONG KONG BUENOS AIRES

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

To my sister KateFor your never-ending love and support

Scholastic Inc. grants teachers permission to photocopy the reproducible pages from this book for classroom
use. No other part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, or stored in a retrieval system,
or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,
without written permission of the publisher. For information regarding permission, write to Scholastic Inc.,
557 Broadway, New York, NY 10012.
Edited by Immacula A. Rhodes
Cover design by Maria Lilja and Norma Ortiz
Interior design by Holly Grundon
Cover and interior illustrations by Maxie Chambliss
ISBN: 0-439-42420-8
Copyright 2006 by Patricia Daly
Published by Scholastic Inc.
All rights reserved.
Printed in the U.S.A.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Connections to the NCTM Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

Glyphs
G OODS & S ERVICES
Grocery Store

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

At the Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14


Loan-a-Book Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
T RANSPORTATION
Train Ride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
At the Airport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
E NTERTAINMENT
Going to the Zoo! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Playtime at the Playground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
C OMMUNITY H ELPERS
Youve Got Mail! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Friendly Firefighter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Construction Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
T YPES

OF

C OMMUNITIES

City Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55


On the Farm

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Introduction
n its Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (released April, 2000), the
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) identified Data Analysis,
Statistics, and Probability as one of five key content-area standards. This standard
addresses the importance of having students:

pose questions

collect, organize, and represent data to answer questions

interpret data using methods of exploratory data analysis

develop and evaluate inferences, predictions, and arguments


based on data

This and other standards are included in the grid on page 9 to show how they
correlate to each glyph activity.
For grades 1 to 3, the NCTM objectives and standards can best be met by
involving students in meaningful, motivating activities that give them opportunities
to collect and represent data in a variety of ways. Creating glyphs, or pictorial
representations of data, provides an excellent way to do this.
Great Glyphs: Neighborhood & Community provides ideas for making glyphs
that link with students preferences and experiences, as well as topics related to
neighborhoods and communities. This gives students a familiar context for
representing datafor example in Loan-a-Book Library, students represent
information about their reading preferences and experiences visiting libraries.
You can connect these activities to various mathematics skills and concepts, as well
as to other school disciplines. For example, At the Airport provides an opportunity
to reinforce patterning, while Grocery Store ties into nutrition studies. All the glyphs
feature elements that emphasize individual preferences and information.

What Is a Glyph?
ust as a graph or Venn diagram conveys information about data that has been
collected, a glyph displays information in the form of a picture. The word glyph
comes from hieroglyphics (picture writing). The details of a glyph describe
information about the person who created it. Each specific detail of a glyph provides
the person viewing it with information. A legend allows students to see each feature
of the glyph and what it represents.
For example, in Grocery Store, the shape of the roof represents whether the
student likes going to the grocery store. If the student likes going to the grocery
store, the roof is a trapezoid. If the student does not like going to the grocery store,
the roof is a rectangle. Other elements, such as the color of the building, the color
of the roof, and the color of the door, represent other information about students.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Once students have completed their glyphs, encourage them to make


observations about their own glyphs and those of their classmates. Invite them to
discuss how their glyph is similar to or different from others. Have them note the
attributes of a classmates glyph and write about what they know about that person
based on the glyph. See pages 89 for other ways to extend learning.

Introducing Glyphs to Students


hese activities are designed for flexible use in the classroom. You might use the
activities in any order, or create a glyph each month as part of your classroom
routine. You might also use literature to introduce a glyph-making activity and
generate interest in the particular topic. A list of related literature links is included
for each glyph.
Each glyph in this book comes with reproducible templates. In advance,
photocopy the pattern pages and legend and collect any other materials necessary
for making the glyph. Review the directions and extension activities, and determine
which of these you might use.
When you first introduce glyphs to students, begin by showing them a completed
glyph. Then show them step-by-step how you used the legend to create the glyph.
As you add each attribute to the glyph (such as the number of columns on the bank
glyph), ask students what this feature represents. It is important for students to
make the connection that each attribute of the glyph represents information,
or data.
One way to do this is by reproducing and distributing the legend page of each
glyph activity. You can also copy the information onto a sheet of chart paper. Be
sure to review the legend and the meaning of each feature with students before and
after they create their own glyphs. For beginning readers, provide directions orally,
one step at a time. You might show students how to use a blank sheet of paper to
cover the legend steps. Sliding the paper down to reveal one step at a time will help
students focus on reading small amounts of text.

Using Glyphs With English Language Learners


tudents who repeatedly hear words in context are more likely to use them and
understand their meaning. The activities in this book help give English
language learners exposure to vocabulary such as geometry words (shape names,
directionality and position words), measurement terms (months of the year, seasons,
time), and number concepts (ordinality, cardinality, even and odd). Reviewing the
directions and legend with students to introduce each activity and following up
with a discussion and interpretation of the glyphs gives students even greater
exposure to the vocabulary. As students compare the attributes of each glyph, they
use number words, shape names, measurement terms, and more. This repeated
exposure greatly benefits ELL students.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

A Teacher-Student Dialogue
he following is an example of a classroom dialogue introducing glyphs to
students for the first time. For each new glyph, modify the discussion to focus on
the questions asked in the glyph-making activities and the responses students
represent in their glyph. As you ask students questions, focus on mathematical
concepts of the glyph rather than the craft-making aspect.

Teacher: (holding up the completed train glyph so that the whole class can see it)
Children, look at this picture and think of something that you can say
about what you see.
Student: It has a red engine.
Student: The other train car is green.
Student: The wheels on your train are black.
Student: There are four windows on the second car.
Student: The train engine has a number on it.
Teacher: All the attributes you just talked about tell something special about
me. This train is a glyph. A glyph tells information about the person
who made it. Lets find out what that information is. (Reveal the
legend, one item at a time, pointing to each feature on the train glyph.)
This sheet is called the legend. The color of the engine tells you
whether I have ever taken a ride on a train. The legend shows that if I
have taken a ride on a train, the train is red. If it is blue, then I have
never taken a ride on a train. What does the color of my engine tell
you about whether I have ever traveled on a train?
Student: Its red. That tells us that you have taken a train ride!
Teacher: Now lets look at the second train car. What does it tell us about me?
Look at the legend and use that information to tell what you know
about me based on the color of the car.
Student: You like buses best! The legend shows that a green car means you like
buses more than the other kinds of transportation.
Teacher: Thats right! Now look at the color of the wheels. This will tell us
where I would like to go on a train. If the wheels are black, it means I
would like to go to the mountains. If the wheels are brown, I would
like to go to the beach. Gray wheels mean I would like to go to a city,
and purple wheels mean I would like to go to another place. Where
would I like to go on a train?
Student: Youd like to go to the mountains.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Teacher: How did you know that?


Student: You colored the wheels on your train
black. That means you want to ride a
train to the mountains.
Teacher: What about the windows on
the second car? What does the
number of windows tell us about
when I like to travel? The legend
shows that if there are three
windows, I like to travel in the
morning. Four windows mean I
like to travel in the afternoon,
and five windows mean I like to
travel in the evening. How
many windows are on the second car?

4+4+3+

1=12

Student: One, two, three, four. I counted four windows. That means you like
to travel in the afternoon.
Teacher: How do you know that I dont like to travel in the morning or
the evening?
Student: If you liked to travel in the morning, the car would have three
windows. And if you liked to travel in the evening, it would have
five windows.
Teacher: Youre right! Now look at the engine number. Why did I write that
number on the engine?
Student: The legend tells you to add the last four digits of your phone number.
Thats how you got the number that you wrote on the engine!
Teacher: Very good! Now, lets review everything you know about me so far,
based on the glyph Ive made. (Discuss the legend and have students tell
what they have learned.) Remember that when you are trying to get
information from a glyph, the legend reminds you what each part of
the glyph represents. Now each of you will make glyphs about
yourselves.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Making Glyphs With Students


fter you have shown students an example of a completed glyph and reviewed
the legend with them, begin by asking them to complete the first question on
the legend. Remind students what information this attribute on the glyph will
reveal. Wait for students to color, cut, and paste to complete the first question.
Then hold up several glyphs in progress, one at a time, and ask the class to explain
what each glyph tells so far about the child who made it. If you do this each time a
new attribute is added, students will begin to grasp the concept that the attributes
represent data. This also gives students a chance to practice analyzing the data
shown on the glyph.
To make a glyph activity a rich and meaningful mathematics experience, rather
than an arts and crafts project, encourage children to carefully consider each item
on the legend before they select and add that attribute to their glyph. Remind
students that each feature on their glyph should represent something about
themselvesbased on the legend.

Once the Glyph Is Complete


Extending Learning
aking time to analyze the glyphs gives students a rich opportunity to build key
math skills. For each glyph, you will find suggestions for critical-thinking
activities and other extension activities that connect glyph-making to math
concepts and to other areas of the curriculum. You will also find suggestions for
books that explore the same themes as the glyphs. Use these to introduce or wrap
up a glyph-making activity.
When students have completed their first glyph activity, ask them to work with a
partner. Have each pair exchange their glyphs and tell a larger group or the whole
class what they know about their partner based on the glyph. Older students can
write these descriptions and then give them to their partner to read. As they talk
and write, students are interpreting and analyzing data.
Another follow-up activity is to brainstorm ways to sort the completed glyphs.
Divide the class into small groups and have each group determine how they will sort
their glyphs. For example, they might sort the At the Airport! glyphs by the number
of clouds or by the shape of the hangar. As each group reports to the class, ask them
to show the sorting method, and then discuss the data that is revealed by each way
of sorting. Since each glyph has many different attributes, each can be sorted in a
variety of ways. Keeping the glyphs sorted, display them on a bulletin board with
the question How did we sort our glyphs? Invite students from other classrooms to
interpret the data.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

With any glyph activity, students can write a story or poem, draw or write about
their glyph and their findings in their math journals, or extend the glyph with other
symbols to represent additional information.
Feel free to modify elements of the glyphs as needed to make them more
appropriate for the students you work with. We have found these activities highly
motivating to studentsand students use of mathematics vocabulary improves as
they create glyphs and interpret the data revealed in them. Enjoy!

Connections to the NCTM Standards

he activities in this book correspond to the standards recommended by the


National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

Train Ride

At the Airport

Going to the Zoo!

Playtime at the Playground

Youve Got Mail!

Friendly Firefighter

Construction Site

City Scene

On the Farm

Measurement

Representation

Connections

Loan-a-Book Library

Communication

Reasoning
and Proof

At the Bank

Problem
Solving

Process Standards
Data Analysis
and Probability

Grocery Store

Geometry

Glyph
Activity

Algebra

Number and
Operations

Content Standards

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Goods & Services

Grocery Store
Trapezoid roof: Likes
going to the grocery store

Purple roof: Exactly


five letters in first name

Orange building:
Favorite food
group is grains

Math
Skills

geometry: shapes

counting

greater than, less


than, equal to

Tan door: Exactly five


letters in last name

Creating the Glyph


istribute copies of the grocery store glyph patterns and legend to students.
Review the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a completed
glyph. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to use the legend
to create their own personal grocery store glyph. If desired, have students glue
all the elements of the glyph onto construction paper for a sturdy backing.

D
Materials

reproducible glyph
patterns and
legend (pages
1213)

completed grocery
store glyph

9- by 12-inch
construction paper

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

Critical Thinking
sk students to search the grocery store glyphs to find and group together all
those that have two features in common. For example, students might
group all the glyphs that have red buildings and a trapezoid roof. Have them
discuss the common features and what they mean (the trapezoid roof means the
student likes going to the grocery store and the red building shows that the
student likes fruit). When finished, ask students to find all the glyphs within
that group that have a third feature in common, such as a yellow door. After
discussing those glyphs, have students find glyphs that have more than three
features in common. (Note: If you would like to have students guess which
student created each glyph, cover the names with sticky notes.)

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Explore More
Math, Social Studies Recruit students to help set up a grocery store in
the classroom. Have them organize empty food boxes, food containers, and play
food on the store shelves, grouping them by types of food. Then have students
label the merchandise with price tags. Add a cash register, play money, and
shopping baskets or bags to the store. Finally, invite small groups of students to
take the role of grocery store employees and shoppers. Encourage the store
employees to offer assistance to the shoppers. Have the shoppers make their
selections, take them to the register, and then pay for their groceries.

Math, Critical Thinking Provide students with expired food coupon


booklets, newspaper food coupon inserts, and grocery or drug store sales flyers
containing food coupons. Explain what coupons are and how they are used. Then
have students cut out and sort food coupons by the item, brand, or food pyramid
grouping that they belong to (for more information on food groups, visit
www.mypyramid.gov). You might also make up math problems for students to solve
using the discounts shown on the coupons. For example, you might ask how much
a $2.00 box of cereal would cost if they used a coupon for 55 off to purchase it.

Science Visit www.mypyramid.gov for information about the food pyramid.


Divide the class into small groups and assign each group a part of the food
pyramid (be sure to include physical activity as one of the groups). Have each
group research their part of the pyramid and present information on it to the
class, including why their part of the pyramid is important. Invite each group to
create a large informative poster with their findings; then display the posters on
a hallway bulletin board.

Literature Links
Grandpas Corner Store
by DyAnne DiSalvo (HarperCollins, 2000).
As newerand largerstores move into the
neighborhood, Lucy worries that Grandpa will
have to sell his corner store. Luckily, Grandpa
has a very busy store with many faithful
customers. This is a great story for learning
about friendship and the importance of the
community.
the
community.

Supermarket
by Kathleen Krull (Holiday House, 2001).
Readers learn about the crops that Pilgrims
grew and sold and about how food is sold in
todays
in
todays
supermarkets.
supermarkets.
Each
Each
part
part
of of
thethe
supermarketand what goes on behind the
scenesis
the
scenesis
highlighted.
highlighted.
Illustrations
Illustrations
feature
feature
a
avariety
varietyofofshoppers
shoppersasasthey
theyshop
shopin inthis
thisbusy
place.place.
busy

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

Grocery Store
Do you like going to the grocery store?
Shape of Roof

rectangle

vegetables

dairy

grains

meat and
beans

red

blue

green

orange

pink

How many letters are in your first name?


fewer than five
letters

exactly five
letters

more than
five letters

brown

purple

black

How many letters are in your last name?

Color of Door

trapezoid

fruits

Color of Roof

no

What is your favorite food group?

Color of
Building

yes

fewer than
five letters

exactly
five letters

more than
five letters

yellow

tan

gray

Write your name on the line in the sign.

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

page 12

Grocery Store
Patterns

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Goods & Services

At the Bank
Math
Skills

patterns

reading/writing

Trapezoid pattern: Would


rather collect nickels

Orange building: Would


rather be a security guard if
worked at a bank

time

counting

one-to-one
correspondence

Hour hand pointing to 9:


Born in September
Minute hand pointing to
26: Birthday is the 26th
Four columns: Has not visited a bank

Creating the Glyph


1. Distribute copies of the bank glyph patterns and legend to students. Review

Materials

reproducible glyph
patterns and
legend (pages
1618)

2. For the building, students choose a sheet of 9- by 7-inch construction paper


in the color that corresponds to their answer for question 1. Students
position the paper horizontally for the bank building, and glue a pattern
along the top for question 2.

completed bank
glyph

the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a glyph you have
completed. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to use the
legend to create their own personal bank glyph.

9- by 7-inch
yellow, orange,
brown, and gray
construction paper

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

3. For question 3, students glue the clock to the center of the building. After
students have completed question 5, have them draw a door below the clock
and write BANK above the door.

Critical Thinking
ivide students into groups or four or five. Have them put their glyphs in
order according to the time on the clocks. Then ask students to interpret
the data on the glyphs and share what it shows about the person who created
each glyph. Ask, Were any students born in the same month? Were any
students born on the same day in different months, such as January 16 and
February 16? Finally, have each group join together with another group.
Challenge them to sequence their glyphs by the time on the clocks and
interpret the data.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Explore More
Math Ask students to estimate how many different ways they can make 25
cents, 50 cents, one dollar, or any other given amount using two different kinds
of coins, such as quarters and nickels. Record their estimates on chart paper.
Then give students play coins and let them work with partners or in small
groups to combine their coins in various ways to equal the given amount. Have
them list the different combinations on paper. When a group agrees that it has
exhausted all the possibilities, have students count how many combinations
they came up with. Then discuss the findings with the class.
Math, Language Arts Provide students with hand lenses and coins.
Instruct them to observe the fronts and backs of different coins and then
describe what they see, such as the words, letters, numbers, and pictures on the
coins. When finished sharing their observations, students can place a sheet of
paper over the coins and make rubbings of them. Then have them label their
coin pictures and record the value of each coin. To extend, cut out the coins
and use them as manipulatives in various story problems.

Math, Critical Thinking Make up logic problems about money for


students to solve. You might ask them to identify the coins in an imaginary
wallet by giving clues such as, I have 5 coins in my wallet. All together they
are worth 21 cents. Only one of the coins is a penny. What are the coins in my
wallet? After students have successfully solved several logic problems on their
own, show them a set of coins and have them make up similar logic problems
for classmates to solve.

Literature Links
The Go-Around Dollar
by Barbara Johnston Adams
(Four Winds Press, 1992).
Readers learn how a dollar bill is made, what its
symbols mean, and how long the average
dollar stays in circulation. As this story follows a
single dollar bill on its travels, it also provides
information about the history of the dollar and
how money works.

Lets Find Out About Money


by Kathy Barabas (Scholastic, 1997).
Take a tour inside the mint to learn where
money comes from. Realistic illustrations help
readers understand the money-making process.
The Story of Money
by Betsy Maestro (Clarion Books, 1993).
Filled with fascinating facts about the history of
money, this book covers topics from trading
and bartering to the first use of coins and paper
money, to electronic transactions.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

At the Bank
1

If you worked at a bank, which job would you rather have?

Color of Building

bank
teller

security
guard

loan
officer

another
job

yellow

orange

brown

gray

Which type of coin would you rather collect?


pennies

nickels

dimes

quarters

Pattern on Top
of Building

In what month were you born? On the clock, draw an


hour hand.
Position of
Hour Hand

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

10

November December

11

12

On what day of the month is your birthday? Draw the minute


hand to show that number of minutes after the hour.

Have you ever visited a bank?

Number of
Columns

yes

no

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

page 16

At the Bank
Patterns

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

At the Bank
Patterns

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Goods & Services

Loan-a-Book Library
Clock hands point to
4:00: Prefers to read
magazines at the library

Fourteen books
on shelf: Would
rather help people
find materials if
worked at a library

Four books on desk:


Usually checks out
nonfiction books

Orange
background:
Would rather
read on the
floor

Desk on left side:


Prefers to go to the
library on the weekend

Creating the Glyph

Math
Skills

right, top, middle

1. Distribute copies of the library glyph patterns and legend to students.


Review the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a
glyph you have completed. Then distribute the other materials,
and invite students to use the legend to create their own personal
library glyph.

directionality: left,

skip-counting

reading/writing
time

multiplication

2. For question 1, students choose a sheet of construction paper in the


color that corresponds to their answer. Have students position the
paper horizontally.

3. For question 4, point out that within each bookshelf, there are equal
numbers of books on each shelf. To determine how many books
there are all together in each bookshelf, students can count the
books on one shelf and multiply by 2.

Materials

reproducible glyph
patterns and
legend (pages

Critical Thinking

2123)

sk students to predict whether more students prefer to check out


fiction, nonfiction, or both fiction and nonfiction. After they make
their predictions, work with students to create a method that will help
answer the question. One method students might use is to draw two
large intersecting circles on the chalkboard. Label the left circle
fiction, the right circle nonfiction, and the intersection of the
circles fiction and nonfiction. Have students write their initials in the
section of the Venn diagram to show their response to question 3. Ask
students to count and compare the number of students in each circle
and then write the results in comparison sentences, using the signs for
greater than, less than, and equal to. Have students use the comparison
sentences to determine whether their predictions were accurate.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

completed library
glyph

9- by 12-inch
white, yellow,
orange, and red
construction paper

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

Explore More
Language Arts, Math Give pairs of students a stack of books.
Challenge the students to put the books in alphabetical order by title. If
needed, they can refer to an alphabet chart to check their work. Afterward,
have them sequence the books by the authors name. Finally, have students
sequence books by their publication dates. To extend, challenge students to
sort the books in other ways, such as by topic or genre.

Social Studies, Career Awareness Invite students to


decide how they would like to arrange the class library: alphabetically by
title or author, by topic, or by some other criteria. Then have small groups
take turns working in the library area to help get it set up. Before officially
opening the class library, invite students to create labels and signs to help
keep the area organized. Students might also design posters listing agreedupon rules for using the library and caring for books. You might even come
up with a library name and logo; then give students index cards to create
their own library cards. Simply have them draw the logo and write the
library name and their own name. Students can take turns being the
librarian and checking out books in your classroom library!

Social Studies Create a list of items for students to search for


during a visit to the school library. Include items such as a dictionary,
magazine, titles of several picture books, a nonfiction book about a
particular topic, a newspaper, the book return slot, and the card catalog.
Ask students to check off each item as they find it. Afterward, review
the list and have students describe where they located each item.

Literature Links
Library Lil
by Suzanne Williams (Dial, 1997).
Discouraged by the townspeoples lack of
interest in reading, librarian Lil decides to take
action. Before long, Lil turns the residents of her
town into avid readers.

Beverly Billingsly Borrows a Book


by Alexander Stadler (Silver Whistle, 2002).
Beverly is thrilled to use her library card. But
when she accidentally misses the due date,
Beverly fears the consequences!
The Library by Sarah Stewart
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1995).
When Elizabeths book collection grows so large
that she cant fit even one more book, she
decides to donate her booksand her home
to the town for a library.

20
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

Loan-a-Book Library
1

Where in the library would you rather read a book?

Color of Background

on a
beanbag

in a
chair

on the
floor

another
place

white

yellow

orange

red

Do you prefer to go the library during the week, on the weekend,


or both?
during the week on the weekend

Position of Desk

right side
of page

page 21

middle
of page

fiction

nonfiction

both fiction and


nonfiction

If you worked at a library, what job would you rather do?

Number of Books
on Shelf

left side
of page

What type of books do you usually check out from the library?

Number of Books
on Desk

both

checking
out books

putting away
books

helping people
find materials

another j ob

10

12

14

16

What do you prefer to do at the library? Draw clock hands.


read stories

Time on Clock

before
12:00 P. M .

read reference
books

read
magazines

between
between
12:00 P. M .
3:00 P. M . and
and 3:00 P. M .
6:00 P. M .

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

another activity
after
6:00 P. M .

Loan-a-Book Library
Patterns

22
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Loan-a-Book Library
Patterns

23
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Transportation

Train Ride
Math
Skills

ordinal numbers

counting

one-to-one

Red engine: Has taken


a ride on a train

Number 12: Sum of last four


digits of phone number

Four windows: Likes to


travel in the afternoon

correspondence

addition

writing numerals
Brown wheels: Would like to
take a train to the beach

Green second car: Favorite


kind of transportation is the bus

Creating the Glyph


Materials

reproducible glyph

1. Distribute copies of the train glyph patterns and legend to students. Review
the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a glyph you have
completed. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to use the
legend to create their own personal train glyph.

patterns and
legend (pages
2627)

completed train

2. Invite students to use small strips of paper to connect the train cars to each
other. If desired, have students glue their glyph to construction paper for a
sturdy backing.

glyph

1 12 -inch paper
strips

12- by 18-inch
construction paper

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

Critical Thinking
ivide the class into small groups. Then ask students what feature of the
train glyph identifies students favorite kind of transportation (the color of
the second car). Instruct the students in each group to share their ideas about
how they might create a graph to represent this information. Encourage the
group members to agree on what kind of graph they would like to make, such as
a vertical or horizontal graph using bars, symbols, or pictures. When finished,
invite each group to share its completed graph with the class. Discuss how all
the graphs represent the same data. To extend, create graphs to represent the
answers to other questions.

24
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Explore More
Math Obtain a copy of a local train schedule (these are often available on
the Internet). Enlarge the schedule on a photocopier, if needed, and distribute
copies of the schedule to students. Then make up time-related problems for
students to solve using their schedules. For example, you might present a problem
such as, A train leaves the station at 9:30 A.M. It arrives at the next station at
9:48 A.M. How long did the train travel? To help students read the schedule, have
them highlight information that is relevant to the word problems. For additional
practice, provide students with a list of train fares and then ask questions related to
the cost of train travel. For instance, ask them to determine how much it would
cost to buy three train tickets to a specific destination.

Social Studies, Language Arts Invite students to describe their


experiences riding on a train or waiting in a train station. Ask students what
other information they know about trains from reading or discussion. If students
have never been on a train, encourage them to research information about
trains. Then invite students to write descriptions about train travel. They might
write a poem, fictional short story, descriptive paragraph, or nonfiction report.
Display their writing alongside their completed glyphs.

Social Studies Have students research the history of trains. Ask them to
compare how early trains are similar to and different from modern trains. For
example, they might learn how trains were powered in the past and how they
get their power today. They might also compare how fast trains of the past
traveled compared to modern trains, and what they were used for in the past
and in modern times. After gathering their information, invite students to
create Venn diagrams to show their comparisons. Invite them to share what
they learned with the class. Students might also create Venn diagrams to
compare trains to other types of vehicles, such as airplanes, boats, or cars.

Literature Links
All Aboard Trains
by Mary Harding
(Platt and Munk, 1989).
Exciting, colorful pictures and fascinating facts
provide loads of information about freight trains,
passenger trains, and even super-speed trains!

Next Stop, Grand Central


by Maira Kalman (G. P. Putnams Sons, 1999).
Whimsical illustrations mirror the daily
excitement and activity of New York Citys
Grand Central Station. This tribute to Grand
Central also features murals displayed in the
historic terminal.

25
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

Train Ride
Have you ever taken a ride on a train?

Color of Engine
(First Car)

blue

train

car

bus

plane

another
kind

red

orange

green

yellow

blue

to the
mountains

to the
beach

to a
city

to another
place

black

brown

gray

purple

When do you like to travel?

Number of Windows
in Second Car

red

Where would you like to go on a train?

Color of Wheels

no

What kind of transportation do you like best?

Color of
Second Car

yes

in the morning

in the afternoon

in the evening

Add the last 4 digits of your phone number. Write the sum on
the engine as your train number.

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

page 26

Train Ride
Patterns

27
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Transportation

At the Airport
Math
Skills

measurement:

Three clouds: Would rather


be an air traffic controller if
worked at an airport

Square
hangar: Has
not been to
an airport

Airplane
pointing
right: Would
rather fly to a
cold climate

length

geometry: shapes

directionality: left,
right

patterns

counting

one-to-one
correspondence

Materials

reproducible glyph
patterns and
legend (pages

AAB/AAB
pattern on
windows:
Would rather
fly in the
afternoon

12-inch
runway: Girl

Creating the Glyph


1. Distribute copies of the airport glyph patterns and legend to students. Review
the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a glyph you have
completed. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to use the
legend to create their own personal airport glyph.

2. Have students glue all the elements of their glyphs to a sheet of construction
paper positioned horizontally.

3. To make the runway, have students measure a strip of black construction


paper with a ruler and then cut it to the appropriate length. They can use
white crayon to draw the lines on the runway.

3032)

completed airport
glyph

9- by 12-inch blue
construction paper

Critical Thinking
se the glyphs to create logic problems for the students to solve.
For example:

I am a girl. I have been to an airport. I would rather fly to a


warm climate and I would rather fly in the afternoon. I would
like to be a pilot. Which glyph is mine?

I am a boy. I have never been to an airport. I would rather


fly to a cold climate. Which glyph is mine?

2- by 12-inch
strips of black
construction paper

12-inch rulers

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

Give additional clues as needed, and have students guess the answers. Once you
have modeled some logic problems, invite volunteers to secretly choose a glyph
and then create a logic problem with clues describing it. Have classmates solve
one anothers logic problems.

28
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Explore More
Math Give each student an index card labeled with a numeral from 1 to 30.
Tell students that the number on their card represents the row that they will sit
in during an imaginary flight. Then generate problems for them to solve with
the numbers. You might present problems such as, Joes seat is in row 26 and
Pams seat is in row 12. How many rows apart are their seats? and Marias
assigned seat is in row 6. During the flight, she asked to move back 9 rows.
Which row is she sitting in? Who has the number for that seat? If desired, let
students line up 30 chairs to represent rows of seats on an airplane. Then have
them use the chairs to solve the problems. To challenge students even more,
you can make up problems involving simple multiplicationfor example, If
there are two seats in each row, how many seats are in 5 rows?

Math Have students work in pairs for this activity. Give each student a paper
clock and an airline schedule showing departure and arrival times for different
flights. Have one student set his or her clock to show a flight departure time
(students can either glue on paper clock hands or draw them). Ask the other
student to set his or her clock to show the arrival time. Then have the partners
determine how long the flight lasted. After the pair determines the flight time for
each flight on the list, have them compare all the times to learn which flight took
the longest amount of time, and which took the shortest amount of time.

Critical Thinking, Language Arts Have students refer to question 3 on


their legend. Where would the student rather travel: to a warm climate or a
cold climate? Then have students create a list of things they would pack for a
trip to such a place. Invite them to share their packing lists with the class.
What items do their lists have in common? What items are different? Why?
After comparing the lists, invite students to take an imaginary flight to their
desired destination. Have them write a story about their trip.

Literature Links
The Airplane Alphabet Books
by Jerry Pallotta
(Charlesbridge, 1997).
Colorful illustrations and detailed descriptions of
airplanes from A to Z provide readers with a
glimpse into aviation history.

Into the Air: An Illustrated


Time Line of Flight
by Ryan Ann Hunter
(National Geographic, 2003).
This beautifully illustrated book provides a
historical account of flight. Includes a list of
recommended resources.

29
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

At the Airport
Are you a girl or boy?

Length of
Runway

boy

12 inches

10 inches

Have you ever been to an airport?

Shape of Hangar

girl

yes

no

rectangle

square

Where would your rather travel on an airplane?


to a warm climate

to a cold climate

left

right

Direction of
Airplane

When would you rather fly? Color the airplane windows


to make a pattern.

Pattern of
Windows

in the morning

in the afternoon

in the evening

AB/AB

AAB/AAB

ABC/ABC

If you worked at an airport, which job would you rather have?

Number of
Clouds

flight
attendant

pilot

air traffic
controller

another job

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

page 30

At the Airport
Patterns

31
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

At the Airport
Patterns

32
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Entertainment

Going to the Zoo!


Round stones on path: Enjoys
watching animals swim

Math
Skills

Elephants and lions: Would


rather visit a zoo between 9:00
A.M. and 12:00 P.M.

Gate in
bottom
left corner:
Has been to
a zoo

directionality: left,
right, center, bottom

Four
bushes:
Would
rather be a
veterinarian
if worked at
a zoo

Red gate:
Would
rather visit a
zoo in the
summer

concepts of time:
seasons, A.M./P.M.

geometry: shapes

counting

one-to-one
correspondence

greater than, less


than

Creating the Glyph


istribute copies of the zoo glyph patterns and legend to students.
Review the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a
glyph you have completed. Then distribute the other materials, and
invite students to use the legend to create their own personal zoo glyph.
Have students glue all the elements of their glyphs to a sheet of
construction paper positioned horizontally.

Critical Thinking

Materials

isplay 68 glyphs on a bulletin board. Use the glyphs to play a


game of Ten Questions with the class. To play, have students take
turns picking a secret glyph and then giving clues about their choice
based on the characteristics shown on it. The rest of the class must
guess the glyph in ten or fewer guesses. For example:

patterns and

The secret glyph shows that the person would rather visit
a zoo from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 P.M.
The secret glyph shows that the person most enjoys
watching animals swim.

As each clue is revealed, the class can eliminate the glyphs that do not
fit the criteria. The clue-giver continues to provide hints about the
secret glyph until students are able to identify it.

33
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

reproducible glyph
legend (pages
3537)

completed zoo
glyph

12- by 18-inch
green construction
paper

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

Explore More
Math Write a list of zoo animals, both large and small, on chart
paper. Ask students to research the animals to learn the average height
of each one. Record the height next to each animals name. Then help
students measure and cut a length of yarn equal to their own height.
Afterward, name an animal on the chart. Ask students if they think the
animal is taller, shorter, or the same height as they are. After making
their predictions, invite a volunteer to measure and cut a length of yarn
equal to the height of the animal. Lay the yarn full-length on the floor
and secure the ends with tape. Finally, have students measure their yarn
against the one on the floor. Were their predictions correct?

Science, Language Arts Take students on a field trip to the


zoo. Encourage them to examine the animals and their habitats. Upon
returning to the classroom, assign an animal to each student. Have
students research their animal to learn more about its physical
characteristics, behavior, habits, and habitat. Then have them compile
facts about their animal in a creative way to share with the class. For
instance, a student might make a mobile, poster, or brochure that
features facts and pictures of their animal.
Science, Critical Thinking Provide small groups with picture
cards featuring animals that can be found at the zoo. Ask students to
discuss ways that they might sort the cards. For example, they might
sort the animals by habitats, outer coverings, and number of legs. After
the group has sorted the cards, invite another group to guess what
criteria were used.

Literature Links
My Visit to the Zoo
by Aliki (HarperCollins, 1997).
Acting as a guide at the Zoological Conservation
Park, a young girl shares interesting information
about animals and their natural habitats.

Good Night, Gorilla


by Peggy Rathmann (Putnam, 1994).
A gorilla gets hold of the keys and unlocks the
cages of the animals in the zoo!
If Anything Ever Goes Wrong at the Zoo
by Mary Jean Hendrick (Harcourt, 1993).
When the zoo floods, all the animals move
into Leslies house.

34
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

Going to the Zoo!


1

Have you ever been to a zoo?

Position of Gate

Im not sure.

bottom left
corner

bottom right
corner

bottom
center

summer

fall

winter

spring

red

blue

yellow

orange

During what time would you rather visit a zoo?

Kinds of Animals

no

During which season would you rather visit a zoo?

Color of Gate

yes

9:00 A.M. to
12:00 P.M.

12:00 P.M. to
3:00 P.M.

3:00 P.M. to
6:00 P.M.

elephants and
lions

lions and
gorillas

gorillas and
elephants

Which activity do you most enjoy watching animals do? Draw


a stone path.

page 35

swim

climb

fly

eat

Shape of Stones

If you worked at a zoo, which job would you rather do?

Number of
Bushes

zookeeper

veterinarian

tour guide

another job

fewer
than 4

more
than 5

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Going to the Zoo!


Patterns

36
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Going to the Zoo!


Patterns

37
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Entertainment

Playtime at the Playground


Yellow background: Walks to
the playground

Red bench: Favorite


playground is at school

Math
Skills

directionality: left,
right

even and odd


numbers

Grass:
Birthday falls
between the
1st10th

concepts of time:
time of day,

Even
number of
rungs on
ladder:
Would rather
go to the
playground
on the
weekend

Sandbox
on right
side: Likes
to go to the
playground
in the
afternoon

calendar

ordinal numbers

fractions

Creating the Glyph


Materials

reproducible glyph

1. Distribute copies of the playground glyph patterns and legend to students.


Review the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a glyph you
have completed. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to
use the legend to create their own personal playground glyph.

patterns and
legend (pages
4041)

completed
playground glyph

2. Have students choose the color of construction paper that corresponds to


their answer to question 1. Then have students position the page
horizontally and glue the elements onto it.

Critical Thinking

9- by 12-inch
yellow, white,
tan, and orange
construction paper

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

ivide the class into three groups by the type of plants shown on their
glyphs (indicating where in the month their birthdays fall). Have each
group analyze the data shown in their group members glyphs. To reinforce basic
fractions, ask students to count how many students are in their group. Then ask
them several different questions about the data on their glyphs, such as, What
fraction of your group prefers to visit the playground in the morning? If there
are 5 students in the group and 2 of them prefer morning visits, students would
express this fraction as 2/5. Have the groups share their answers with the group.

38
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Explore More
Math Invite students to create their own playground collages using
construction paper shapes in various sizes and colors. When finished, have them
count how many times they used each shape. Then challenge students to create
a graph to show how many of each shape they used in their collages.

Math For one week, have a volunteer keep track of the number of minutes
that the class spends on the playground each day. At the end of the week, write
the results for each day on the chalkboard. Ask students to find the sum of the
daily totals and then convert the minutes into hours and minutes. Record the
amount of time each week spent doing other activities as well, such as
independent reading and having lunch. Then ask students to compare the
amounts by asking questions such as, How many minutes did we spend on the
playground on Monday and Wednesday? and How many more minutes did we
spend reading than playing on the playground this week?

Health and Safety, Language Arts Have students create a list


of playground safety rules. They might include rules such as, Take turns, Look
where you are going, and Always stay seated in the swings. Then divide the
class into groups and assign each group one or two rules. Have the students
create a poster for each of their rules explaining why the rule is necessary.
Display all the posters on a bulletin board with the title Playing It Safe on
the Playground.

Literature Links
Its My Turn
by David Bedford
(Tiger Tales, 2001).
Oscar and Tilly just cant seem to get along at
the playground. After one conflict and then
another, the two finally solve their problem with
the help of a seesaw.

Down the Dragons Tongue


by Margaret Mahy (Orchard Books, 2000).
A father takes his twins to the playground and
soon becomes the biggest fan of an enormous
slide. Brightly colored illustrations capture the
playfulness of this playground tale.
The Great Jungle Gym Standoff
by Catherine McCafferty
(Golden Books Publisher, 1999).
When the principal wants to tear down the
old jungle gym on the playground, the
students devise a plan to rescue their
beloved Old Rusty.

39
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

Playtime at the Playground


How do you travel to the playground?

Color of
Background

white

tan

orange

in the morning

in the afternoon

left side of page

right side of page

during the week

on the weekend

odd number

even number

Where is your favorite playground?

Color of Bench

yellow

ride a bike another way

When would you rather play on the playground? Draw rungs on


the slide ladder.
Number of
Rungs

ride in a car

When do you like to go to the playground?

Position of
Sandbox

walk

at school

at a park

another place

red

blue

purple

When in the month does your birthday fall? Draw grass, flowers,
or bushes.
st
th
th
th
st
st
Type of Plants

1 10

11 20

21 31

grass

flowers

bushes

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

page 40

Playtime at the Playground


Patterns

41
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Community Helpers

Youve Got Mail!


Green
background:
Favorite type of
mail is letters

Math
Skills

Hat pointing right:


Prefers sending letters

Package: Would
rather deliver mail
Even number
on mailbag: Has
visited a post
office

Red mailbag:
Receives mail at
the post office

directionality: right,
left

even and odd


numbers

writing numerals

Creating the Glyph

patterns

1. Distribute copies of the letter carrier glyph patterns and legend to students.
Review the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a glyph you
have completed. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to
use the legend to create their own personal letter carrier glyph.

Materials

reproducible glyph
patterns and
legend (pages
4445)

completed letter
carrier glyph

9- by 12-inch
yellow, green, red,
orange, and purple
construction paper

2. For question 1, have students choose a sheet construction paper in the color
that corresponds to their answer. Have students position the paper vertically.

Critical Thinking
hoose one attribute and arrange some of the completed letter carrier glyphs
in an AB/AB pattern. For example, use the direction of the hat and make a
left/right/left/right pattern. Challenge students to identify the pattern and then
select a few more glyphs to extend the pattern. Then ask them what they know
about the students who created the glyphs in the pattern. (In this case, the
direction of the hat indicates whether students prefer sending or receiving
letters.) Repeat the activity using a different attribute to create another pattern,
such as ABC/ABC using the color of the letter carriers bag. For an added
challenge, use more than one attribute in a pattern, such as left-facing hat, odd
number on bag, left-facing hat, odd number on bag.

scissors

glue or paste

Explore More

crayons

Math Bring in an assortment of envelopes, postcards, and other pieces of


mail that have canceled stamps on them. Or create your own stamps by printing

42
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

rubber stamp figures on the upper right corner of a supply of index cards. Then
write a money value, in cents, on each stamp. To use, put all the pieces of
mail facedown in a basket. Invite students to take turns choosing two items
from the basket. Have them turn over the cards, find the stamps, and add the
value of the two stamps. Or you might have students set up a subtraction
problem with the two numbers and then find the difference.

Language Arts Set up a letter writing station in your classroom with


envelopes, stationery, and stickers for stamps. Teach students how to address an
envelope and set up a letter. Provide samples of addressed envelopes and several
styles of letters, both formal and informal. Invite students to imagine they are a
letter carrier or another community service provider, such as a firefighter or
librarian. Have students research and then write an informative letter about a
day on the job. Students can make up an imaginary recipient and address.
Decorate a shoe box for a mailbox and have students place the letters inside.
On a rainy day, open up the mail and share the letters with the class!

Social Studies Take students on a field trip to the post office to learn
about how mail is processed and delivered. Afterward, have students imagine
that they have mailed a letter. Ask them where and how the letter will travel
after it leaves their mailbox. Have students create a flow chart that shows the
route of their letter from the mailbox to its final destination. When finished,
invite them to share their flow charts with the class.

Literature Links
The Post Office Book:
Mail and How It Moves
by Gail Gibbons
(T. Y. Crowell, Jr., 1982).
Readers follow a letter from the moment it is
mailed until it reaches its final destination. This
step-by-step overview of the mailing process
also includes a glossary and interesting
information on how messages were sent
throughout history.

Messages in the Mailbox:


How to Write a Letter
by Loreen Leedy (Holiday House, 1991).
Mrs. Gators class learns how to write
letters, from friendly letters and letters of
congratulations to business letters and letters
of complaint. They also learn about other kinds
of correspondence, stamps, and how mail is
moved from place to place.
Mr. Griggs Work
by Cynthia Rylant (Orchard Books, 1989).
When Mr. Griggs gets the flu and has to stay
home, he misses the work he does at the post
officeand his customers miss him, too!

43
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

Youve Got Mail!


What is your favorite type of mail?
postcards

letters

yellow

green

Color of
Background

purple

sending letters

receiving letters

right

left

no

yes

odd number

even number

Where is the mailbox in which your family receives mail?

Color of Mailbag

orange

Have you ever visited a post office? Write a number between 1 and
20 on the mailbag.
Number on
Mailbag

red

Which do you prefer, sending letters or receiving letters?

Direction of Hat

magazines packages something


else

on my
street

at my house
or building

at the
post office

another
place

blue

green

red

orange

Which job would you rather do?

Type of Mail
in Hand

pick up mail

sort mail

letter

postcard

deliver mail another job


package

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

magazine

page 44

Youve Got Mail!


Patterns

45
Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Community Helpers

Friendly Firefighter
15: Day of birthday

Red helmet:
Finds tools most
interesting

Math
Skills

writing numerals

multiplication

even and odd

Tan coat and pants:


Would rather teach fire
safety
Walkie-talkie:
Number of letters
in first name
when doubled is
odd

Purple
background:
Would rather ride
in the fire truck

numbers

addition

counting

one-to-one
correspondence

Creating the Glyph


1. Distribute copies of the firefighter glyph patterns and legend to students.
Review the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a glyph you
have completed. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to
use the legend to create their own personal firefighter glyph.

2. For question 1, have students choose a sheet of construction paper in the


color that corresponds to their answer and position it vertically.

Materials

reproducible glyph
patterns and
legend (pages
4849)

completed
firefighter glyph

9- by 12-inch
orange and purple
construction paper

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

Critical Thinking
hoose an attribute of the glyphs that is represented by more than two
choices. For example, you might focus on the job students would like to do
if they were firefighters (this is represented by the color of the coat and pants).
After you decide on the attribute, name two specific choices shown for that
attribute. For the job preferences, you might name rescue people (blue coat)
and teach fire safety (tan coat). Ask students to gather and count all the
glyphs that show these attributes. Then, using the total glyph count as the sum
and blank lines for the addends, write an incomplete number sentence on the
chalkboard (such as __ +__ = 15). Have students count the glyphs that
represent each choice and use the results to fill in the missing numbers. On
another round, you might provide one addend and the sum, then have students
fill in the missing addend (9 + __ = 15). Or you might write both addends and
have students find the sum. Similarly, you might set up incomplete subtraction
equations for students to solve. Each time, have students count the glyphs to
check their answers.

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Explore More
Math Divide the class into small groups. Then have the students in each
group sequence their glyphs by the numbers written on the firefighters hats.
Which glyph has the highest number? The lowest number? What do these
numbers represent? (They represent the day of the month on which students
birthdays fall.) When finished, create different groups and have students repeat
the activity. You might also group students by whether their glyphs have odd or
even numbers and then have them sequence their glyphs. Finally, have the
whole class work together to sequence all the glyphs. Do any of the glyphs have
the same helmet number? What does this show about those students?

Social Studies, Personal Safety Visit a fire station or invite a


firefighter to your classroom to teach students about fire safety. Afterward,
review and practice the procedure students should follow during a fire drill at
school. To emphasize that the procedure may differ depending on where
students are when the fire alarm sounds, you might want to have the class
practice the drill while at different locations around the school. Also, encourage
students to work with their families to develop a fire exit plan for their home.

Math Challenge students to solve story problems related to firefighters, their


equipment, and their jobs. You might present problems such as:

The pumper truck holds 200 gallons of water. Firefighters used


120 gallons to put out a fire. How many gallons of water are left
in the truck?

The fire truck ladder extends 80 feet into the air. Frances the Firefighter
climbed halfway up the ladder. How many feet did she climb?

Freddie the Firefighter started his shift at 9:00 A.M. He worked an


eight-hour shift. What time did he leave work?

Literature Links
Firefighter Frank
by Monica Wellington (Dutton, 2002).
Readers learn about a day in the life of a
firefighter and discover that these brave
community helpers do more than just put out
fires! A list of fire safety tips is included at the
back of the book.

Fireman SmallFire Down Below!


by Wong Herbert Yee (Houghton Mifflin, 2001).
A leaky roof at the firehouse forces Fireman
Small to check into the Pink Hotel. But his
sleep is interrupted there by a fire down below!
Fortunately, Fireman Small knows what to do to
rescue the guests and put out the fire.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

Friendly Firefighter
If you were a firefighter, would you rather drive the fire truck
or ride in it?
Color of
Background

drive

ride

orange

purple

If you were a firefighter, which job would you most like to do?

Color of Coat
and Pants

rescue
people

put out
fires

teach fire
safety

another
job

blue

yellow

tan

black

Each company, or team, of firefighters has a number. Write


the day of your birthday on the helmet.

Which part of the fire truck do you find most interesting?

Color of Helmet

tools

siren

hose

ladder

red

yellow

green

orange

Double the number of letters in your first name. Is the number


odd or even?
walkie-talkie
flashlight
Tool in Hand

odd

even

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

page 48

Friendly Firefighter
Patterns

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Community Helpers

Construction Site

Math
Skills

directionality: left,
right, up, down

measurement:
length

Blue
bulldozer:
Would like
to build a
road

Crane up:
Foot measures
longer than 7
inches

Bulldozer
pointing
right:
Would
rather
operate a
crane

greater than, less

Yellow hard hats: Has seen a construction site

Red crane:
Index finger
measures
longer than 2
inches

than, equal to

Creating the Glyph


1. Distribute copies of the construction site glyph patterns and legend to

Materials

reproducible glyph
patterns and
legend (pages
5254)

students. Review the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a


completed glyph. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to
use the legend to create their own personal construction site glyph.

completed

2. Have students glue all the elements of their glyph onto a sheet of
construction paper positioned horizontally. For question 3, students
glue on the cranes arm (in either the up or down position) to the position
that matches their answer.

construction site
glyph

12- by 18-inch
light-colored
construction paper

12-inch rulers

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

3. After students have completed question 5, encourage them to draw their


own structure being built on their construction site.

Critical Thinking
elect six of the completed construction site glyphs and sort them into two
groups. Ask students to guess the rule by looking for the attributes that are
common to all glyphs in one of the groups. The attributes could be that the
construction sites have left-facing bulldozers (representing students who would
rather operate a bulldozer) or the construction workers are wearing yellow hard
hats (representing students who have seen a construction site).

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Explore More
Math Tell students that construction workers must often use measurement in
their work. Ask students to think of ways they think a construction worker
might use measurement on the job. Divide the class into pairs of students. Then
give each pair a tape measure and a list of items around the classroom to
measure. Instruct the partners first to estimate the length of each item on the
list. Then have them work together to measure the items and record their
findings. When finished, ask the pairs to share and compare their estimates and
actual measurements.

Social Studies, Language Arts Invite students to imagine they


are construction workers. What kind of project are they building? What are
their responsibilities on the job? What do they wear and what do they do in
order to stay safe while working? What are their favorite parts of the job? What
are the most difficult parts of the job? How do they operate different kinds of
machinery? Encourage students to research these questions and then create a
booklet describing the job of a construction worker.

Social Studies, Math Create a construction site right in your


classroom! Provide students with materials such as paper-towel tubes, empty
boxes and containers in various sizes, plastic caps, lids from jars, cut foam and
sponges, tape, glue, markers, and so on. You might send a letter home to
families asking them to donate recyclable materials for this project. Designate
an area for the construction site and display signs that say Students at Work
and Hard Hat Area. Invite students to visit the center to build a collaborative
class structure. Take instant photographs of the construction site from time to
time to track its progress. When the structure is complete, place the photos in a
bag and challenge students to sequence the photos.

Literature Links
Community Helpers:
Construction Workers
by Tami Deedrick
(Bridgestone Books, 1998).
This story introduces construction workers and
the many things they do, from what they drive
and the tools they use to the training they
receive and how they help their community.

The Night Worker


by Kate Banks
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000).
Each night, Papa puts on his hard hat and
leaves his family to operate the heavy
machinery at a construction site. Then one
night, Papa surprises his son, Alex, with a hard
hat and an invitation to join him on the job!

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

Construction Site
If you were a construction worker, which machine would you
rather operate?
bulldozer

crane

left

right

Direction of
Bulldozer

If you were a construction worker, what would you like


to build?
Color of
Bulldozer

a road

a building

a bridge

another
project

blue

red

purple

orange

Construction workers use measurement on the job. Measure


your foot.
7 inches or longer

less than 7 inches long

up

down

Position of Crane

Measure your index finger.

Color of Crane

longer than
2 inches

exactly
2 inches long

less than
2 inches long

red

green

yellow

Have you ever seen a construction site?

Color of
Hard Hats

yes

no

yellow

red

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

page 52

Construction Site
Patterns

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Construction Site
Patterns

up

down

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Types of Communities

City Scene
Flag on first building: Has been to a city

Math
Skills

Order of buildings is medium,


large, small: Would rather take a
tour in a city

10 or more windows on tallest


building: Likes to walk around a city

Red doors on tallest building:


Thinks people are the most
interesting part of a city

Ambulance and bus: Would rather


eat at a pizza shop

medium, large

ordinal numbers

counting

one-to-one
correspondence

Creating the Glyph

size: small,

greater than, less


than

1. Distribute copies of the city glyph patterns and legend to students.


Review the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a glyph
you have completed. Then distribute the other materials, and invite
students to use the legend to create their own personal city glyph.

Materials

2. To start, have students position the paper horizontally and draw a


road along the bottom. Instruct them to leave room for the buildings
behind the road. To show the answer to question 1, students glue
their buildings in a particular order along the road from left to right.
To show the answer to question 5, students glue on two vehicles.
Invite students to draw details on their city scene.

reproducible glyph
patterns and
legend (pages
5759)

Critical Thinking

completed city
glyph

reate four signs labeled Sandwich Shop, Pizza Shop, Bakery,


and Another Place. Hang the labels on a wall, leaving room
beneath each for students to display their glyphs. Have students tape
their glyphs beneath the sign that represents where they would rather
eat in a city. When finished, the glyphs will be arranged as follows:

Sandwich shop: glyphs with taxi and ambulance

Pizza shop:

glyphs with ambulance and bus

Bakery:

glyphs with bus and car

Another place:

glyphs with car and taxi

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

12- by 18-inch
white construction
paper

crayons

scissors

glue or paste

Ask students to count how many glyphs are in each column and
then use those numbersand the signs for greater than, less than, and
equal toto write number comparison sentences. (For example, students
who would rather eat at a sandwich shop < students who would rather
eat at a bakery.) Repeat the activity by having students sort their glyphs
by other attributes, such as how they would like to travel around a city
or what they would rather do in a city.

Explore More
Math Have students work with partners to find as many different
shapes as possible on their city glyphs. Have them name each shape
they discover and describe how it is used in their city scene. Then give
the students a collection of plastic or paper shapes. Explain that one
student will use the shapes to create a building or a cityscape. Have the
builder arrange the shapes to create a city and then take it apart. Next,
have the other student duplicate the first students work. Have students
switch roles after each round of play.

Language Arts Invite students to imagine they are either flying


in a plane over a city or riding through a city in a car or bus. Encourage
them to think about all the things they might see, hear, smell, or feel as
they travel. After a short period of mentally experiencing the city
from their chosen vantage points, ask students to write about their
experiences. Encourage them to use their senses in their description.
Have them illustrate their work and then share it with the class.

Literature Links
Uptown
by Bryan Collier
(Henry Holt and Company, 2000).
Sharing his love for his uptown neighborhood, a
young boy takes readers on a tour of Harlem,
New Yorkfrom the Metro-North Train and the
shops on 125th Street to the Apollo Theater
and the Harlem River.

City Green
by DyAnne DiSalvo-Ryan
(Morrow Junior Books, 1994).
Saddened by the litter-filled vacant lot on their
city block, Marcy and her neighbors take action
to improve it.
Good Morning, City
by Elaine Moore (BridgeWater Books, 1995).
Warm, interesting illustrations help readers
experience the changing light and growing
noise of a city as it wakes up to a new day.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

City Scene
1

What would you rather do in a city? Put the buildings in order


from left to right.
go to a
go to
take
another
Order of
Buildings

a park

a tour

activity

small,
medium,
large

small, large,
medium

medium,
large, small

large, small,
medium

Have you ever been to a city? Glue the flag to the roof of a
building.
Position of Flag

museum

yes

no

Im not sure.

on first
building

on second
building

on third
building

How would you like to travel in a city? Draw windows on the


tallest building.
walk
bus
taxi
car
another
way
Number of
Windows

page 57

6 or
fewer

What do you think would be most interesting about a city?

Color of Doors on
Tallest Building

10 or
more

restaurants

people

buildings

something
else

blue

red

green

purple

bakery

another
place

bus and
car

car and
taxi

Where would you rather eat in a city?


sandwich
shop
Types of Vehicles

pizza
shop

taxi and ambulance


ambulance and bus

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

City Scene
Patterns

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

City Scene
Patterns

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Types of Communities

Math
Skills

patterns

geometry: shapes

even and odd

On the Farm
Red barn: Favorite farm animal is a cow

Even number of sheep: Would


rather tend the animals

numbers

counting

one-to-one

Rectangle-shaped pasture: Has


not been to a farm

correspondence

Pig on right side: Would rather


drive a tractor

directionality: left,
right
ABA/ABA pattern on fence: Favorite foods
from a farm are fruits and vegetables

Creating the Glyph


Materials

reproducible glyph
patterns and

1. Distribute copies of the farm glyph patterns and legend to students. Review
the legend, one characteristic at a time, as you display a glyph you have
completed. Then distribute the other materials, and invite students to use the
legend to create their own personal farm glyph.

legend (pages
6264)

completed farm
glyph

12- by 18-inch
blue construction

2. To create the glyph, have students position the paper horizontally and glue
the two fence strips along the bottom of the page.

3. Instruct students to choose the green shape that corresponds to their answer
to question 2 (square or rectangle). Have them glue this pasture to the
right side of the page, leaving room to glue the barn to the left side.

paper

6- by 6-inch
squares of green
construction paper

6- by 8-inch
rectangles of green
construction paper

scissors

glue or paste

crayons

Critical Thinking
ave students identify the pattern of the fence on each glyph. Challenge
them to add a sticky note on each glyph to label the pattern as AB/AB,
ABB/ABB, ABA/ABA, or ABC/ABC. Then sort the glyphs into four groups by
pattern. Ask students what they know about the students who created the
glyphs in each group (their favorite type of food that comes from a farm). Then
have each group work together to analyze the rest of the data on their glyphs.
Do any of the glyphs have any other common characteristics? What does this
show about the students who created them?

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Explore More
Math Reinforce basic multiplication with this farm-stand activity. On chart
paper, list several types of foods that come from a farm. Write a price, in whole
dollar amounts from $1 to $5, beside each food. For example, you might list a
gallon of milk at $2, a dozen eggs at $3, and a basket of berries at $1. Then
present students with simple word problems to solve using multiplication and
division, such as, How much money would you need to buy 3 gallons of milk?
and If you spent $12 on eggs, how many eggs would you have? Challenge
students to create their own word problems for classmates to solve.

Social Studies Display a few pictures of male and female farmers. Then
discuss with students what kinds of plants or animals that they might like to raise
if they were farmers. Have students paint a picture on a larger sheet of paper to
represent the kind of farm they would like to operate. Next, invite them to create
portraits of themselves dressed as farmers. Ask them to cut out their self-portraits
and glue them onto their farm pictures. Finally, have them write about their
imaginary farm life and experiences. After volunteers have shared their work with
the class, display all the pictures and writing on a bulletin board.

Science Practice some farming right in your classroom! Working with


students, plant a garden either in a windowsill box or an outdoor area. Label
craft sticks with the names of the seeds you planted and use them to show
where the seeds are located in the garden. Have students research how to care
for plants and make a list of things you need to do to care for your garden. Let
students take part in watering and weeding. Have students write descriptions of
their experiences as a farmer. Then ask them to imagine how much work goes
into caring for an entire farm!

Literature Links
Barnyard Banter
by Denise Fleming
(Henry Holt and Company, 1994).
As a goose silently chases a butterfly, the other
farm animals are noisily going about their
business. Bold, textured illustrations provide the
perfect backdrop for this noise-filled romp
around the farmyard.

Inside a Barn in the Country


by Alyssa Satin Capucilli
(Scholastic, 1995).
Written to the rhythm of This Is the House
That Jack Built, this simple cumulative tale
ends in a chorus of noise as each animal is
awakened and adds it own unique sound to
the once-silent night.

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

Legend

Name

On the Farm
What is your favorite type of food from a farm? Color a pattern
on the fence.
milk
eggs
fruits and another type
Pattern on Fence

AB/AB

ABC/ABC

yes

no

square

rectangle

cow

chicken

pig

another
animal

red

yellow

orange

brown

If you worked on a farm, which would you rather do?

Number of
Sheep in Pasture

ABA/ABA

What is your favorite farm animal?

Color of Barn

of food

Have you ever been to a farm?

Shape of Pasture

ABB/ABB

vegetables

tend the animals

tend the crops

even number

odd number

How would you rather get from one place to another on


a farm?
on a horse
on a tractor
Position of Pig

left side of page

right side of page

Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources

page 62

On the Farm
Patterns

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On the Farm
Patterns

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Great Glyphs: Neighbirhood & Community Patricia Daly, Scholastic Teaching Resources