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10.29.12

10.29.12

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Monday, October 29, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 46
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................7
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .......................9Puzzles .................... 11Classifieds ...............11
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A
labama headcoach NickSaban didn’taddress them by namefollowing Alabama’s 38-7thrashing of MississippiState, but linebacker C.J.Mosley knew they werealready on his team-mates minds when theclock hit 0:00 Saturday.Everybody knew itwas coming all year,but now it’s finallyarrived: The No. 1Crimson Tide will takeits championship questto Baton Rouge, La.,this Saturday for a top-5showdown with the No. 5LSU Tigers.It’s a rematch of The Rematch, whereAlabama stomped LSU21-0 in the BCS NationalChampionship just twomonths after a 9-6 over-time loss to the Tigers inTuscaloosa.“We don’t even haveto talk about it,” Mosleysaid. “You already knowwhat is set for nextweek’s game based off last year and based off the national champion-ship. We just have totreat every game like it’sanother game. We justgot to be ready for whatthey bring.”
By Marc Torrence |
Assistant Sports Editor
SPORTS
| FOOTBALL
Top:
Students at the Mississippi State were already prepared for LSU game.
Bottom left, center and right:
 Alabama’soffense and defense put up a shut-out against the LSU Tigers during theBCS National Championship in New Orleans on Jan. 9.
CW | Austin Bigoney, Photo Illustration Mackenzie BrownCW FileCW FileCW File
Students trainas Army cadets
NEWS
| ARMY ROTC
By Nate Procter 
Staff Reporter
Once a focal point in theheart of Tuscaloosa, the AllenJemison building has beencloser to demolition than promi-nence as of late. However, theTuscaloosa Arts Council andtheir supporters believe theaddress will soon spark interestagain.The council, followingTuscaloosa’s acquisition of a$1.5 million HUD grant and vol-unteer funding, are renovatingthe old building on the cornerof 7th Street and GreensboroAvenue into what will becomeThe Dinah Washington CulturalArts Center.“We want to give the arts com-munity a sense of home,” SandraWolfe, executive director of thecouncil, said. “[Cultural centers]give people within the commu-nity and people coming into ourcommunity a way to connect.”Wolfe said the center willgreatly expand their capa-bilities to present works, holdworkshops and facilitate thecommunal artistic environmentshe hopes to create. The mainpoints within the center, twoprimary gallery spaces, a blackbox theatre/workshop spaceand several artist studios, wouldprovide this flexibility.The largest gallery space, at1,500 square feet, is designatedfor The University of Alabama,in part of the effort to coordinatecultural efforts between the cityand the University.“It’s part of bringing theUniversity communities outand melding them with theTuscaloosa community,” Wolfesaid. “What often happens incollege communities is that thetown doesn’t really know what’shappening there.”The space will be used todisplay works from UA fac-ulty, MFA students and touringexhibits, as well. The additionalstudio space provided will givethe council far more flexibility,Wolfe said. The Bama Theatre,which offers its own galleryspace, is booked until next sum-mer.Beyond the studio space,Wolfe said the theatre andcommunity rooms will be usedextensively for a variety of University projects: written,musical, dance and others thatwould house council workshopsand local artistic groups. Themore intimate size of the floor-level black box theatre providesa more appropriate venue formany smaller or children-aimedproductions.Additionally, the second flooroffers costume workshop spaceand storage that will grant anew home for the TuscaloosaChildren’s Theater, offices forTCT alongside the TuscaloosaSymphony Orchestra andTuscaloosa CommunityDancers and six individual stu-dio spaces. Wolfe expressed thatthe next stage of developmentwould offer similar features onthe third floor of the building.
By Sarah Robinson
Contributing Writer
The Dinah WashingtonCultural Arts Center is inch-ing closer to completion withhelp from the TuscaloosaCounty Commission, whichis contributing $500,000 overthe next two years for theproject on Oct. 17.The Arts Center will bein the old downtown Allenand Jemison building atGreensboro Avenue and 7thStreet.County CommissionChairman Hardy McCollumsaid the commission hasbeen working with the Artsand Humanities Council of Tuscaloosa County, Inc. onthe CAC, which is scheduledto open Aug. 29, 2013.“The property is across thestreet from the courthouse,and we have an interest inmaking sure the propertiesin and around the courthouseare attractive and well-kept,” McCollum said. “Moreimportantly, we felt it wasgood for the community.”The County Commissionagreed to give $500,000 overa two-year timeframe, equal-ing $250,000 each year. TheCity of Tuscaloosa has alsocontributed $1.5 milliontoward the project, leavingthe Council to raise another$1.9 million for finalizations.Sandy Wolfe, director of the Arts Council, said theywanted to approach the gov-ernment, foundations andcorporations about dona-tions before approaching thepublic. Birmingham’s DanielFoundation, Alabama Power,Alabama State Council onthe Arts and The Universityof Alabama have contributedto the project.“Fundraising is alwayschallenging, but especiallyso in a slow economy,” JimHarrison, co-chairman of theCAC Campaign Committee,said. “Combine that with thepost-tornado relief effortslast year, and it was a verydifficult environment inwhich to be raising moneyfor new projects.”Renovations started May2010, expecting the ArtsCenter to be open by thisyear. Wolfe said the city’sportions were scheduled tostart shortly after the April27 tornado, which, along withother normal constructiondelays, set the grand openingback.Construction crews havebeen repairing and clean-ing the brick, removing thecarpet and linoleum on thefirst and second floors, add-ing stairwells, replacingwindows, adding bathroomsand bringing electrical wir-ing and plumbing up to reg-ulation. The crews are nowexpanding restrooms andworking to refinish the heart-wood pine floors on the firstand second floors.
Center to devote 1,500 square feet of gallery space to University
April 2011 tornado set back $3.9 Million Arts Council project
After delay, Cultural Arts Center to open in August 2013
CW | Austin Bigoney
rmy ROTC cadet trains for reconnaissance in Cottondale, Ala.
We want to give the arts com-munity a sense of home. [Culturalcenters] give people within thecommunity and people coming intoour community a way to connect.
— Sandra Wolfe
Combine [the slow economy] withthe post-tornado relief efforts lastyear, and it was a very difficultenvironment in which to be raisingmoney for new projects.
— Jim Harrison
Old Jemison buildingrenovations continue
Arts community toget ‘sense of home’Undefeated Alabama to faceLSU for 3rd time in 365 days
SEE
LSU
PAGE 11SEE
CAC
PAGE 2SEE
ARTS COUNCIL
PAGE 2
CULTURE
| TUSCALOOSA ARTS
NEWS
| TUSCALOOSA ARTS
By Mazie Bryant 
Assistant News Editor
It’s 6 a.m., and they’vealready been running for 15minutes. Sprint for 30 seconds,rest for 60 seconds, repeat 20times. Abdominal exercises,push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups.Monday, Tuesday andThursday of every week,members of The University of Alabama Army ROTC programare divided into groups basedon age and athleticism on theUniversity Recreation fields atthe break of dawn, and train-ing ensues for over an hour.Strength and stamina areassessed, and the cadets arepushed to the limit.“The cadets are here at theUniversity for a degree,” Sgt.1st Class Davis said. “But weare trying to build a founda-tion for physical training and abase knowledge for a militarycareer. They are more or lessthe same as athletes with class-es and training.”Established in 1860 as a dis-ciplinary initiative to coun-ter behavioral problems of University students, the battal-ion is one of only three Corpsof Cadets across the country tohave participated in the CivilWar. During the Civil War, thecorps gathered to defend theUniversity from Union troops,and the Little Round Houseadjacent to Gorgas Libraryserved as a guard post, Davissaid.
Female commandermakes UA history
SEE
ROTC
PAGE 2
 
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“There’s simply so muchpotential for new opportuni-ties we couldn’t accommodatebefore,” Wolfe said.Similar to the council’sBama Theatre, the AllenJemison building fell underhistoric building exceptions,which allowed the council toabandon some major over-hauls the updated buildingcode would require. Thisallowed them to update thefacility while maintaining thehistorical significance theformer store holds within thecommunity.“It was a hub forTuscaloosa,” Wolfe said. “It’spart of the fabric of this com-munity, and it’s importantthat we preserve that in someway.”Brian Brooker of EllisArchitects, architect of theCAC, took these consider-ations into mind with hisdesign. Brooker said he seesTuscaloosa’s downtown inthe midst of a revival, recall-ing years when the area didn’thave much use. He said as theUniversity has grown, build-ings have been repurposed,and its growth has beenundeniable.“The downtown area hasretained its integrity, mostly,through the years,” Bookersaid. “And there are a lotof buildings that await newuses, like the Allen Jemisonbuilding.”He spoke of their efforts topreserve the historical pres-ence of the downtown fixture.Through this effort, much of the building’s exterior haskept its original makeup, withadditional efforts to mimic thepatterns of the original store-front and aesthetic improve-ments to windows.Within the building, codeupdates were made, andthe new interior, featuringspecially pivoting gallerydoors and new lighting, wasdesigned. Exposed brick-work, uncovered hardwoodflooring and the preserva-tion of the signature pneu-matic tube, which functionedto transport money in theold store, reveal historicaltouches.“We’re going to keep itwhere it is and sort of make anart exhibit out of [the tube]”Booker said. “We’ve tried toleave exposed as much of theoriginal structure as we can.”Wolfe viewed the CAC as just one part of the down-town’s artistic growth, along-side private studio housing,gallery spaces and diningthat will stretch Greensboro’spedestrian area down to theCAC and 7th Street. She citedTuscaloosa as being “on thecusp” of becoming a true cul-tural and artistic hub.“When I moved here 20years ago, there wasn’ta reason to come down-town,” Wolfe said. “That’sall changing.”
The Arts Council chose theAllen and Jemison buildingbecause of its accessibility tothe community and to save it,Wolfe said. The building wasonly a week from destructionwhen the center was plannedfor the location.“Sometimes, it’s really hardto find some of the arts organi-zations if you are not familiarwith Tuscaloosa,” Wolfe said.“This center will give an easylocation for people to connectto the arts.”The CAC will include a gal-lery for the Arts Council, ablack box theatre, workshopspace for rehearsal, musicrecital halls, offices for localart groups, poetry readingspace and gallery space forThe University of Alabama. Itwill also provide a home for theTuscaloosa Symphony, commu-nity dancers and the children’stheatre.As of now, the Arts Councilhas secured 80 percent of thetotal $3.4 million needed tocomplete the project.Anyone interested in moreinformation on how to becomea partner in the project shouldcontact Sandra Wolfe at 205-758-4994, ext. 3.
CAC
FROM PAGE 1
Downtown integrity tobe preserved at CAC
ARTS COUNCIL
FROM PAGE 1
Arts Council buildscenter downtown
Millions brace for Hurricane Sandy
MCT Campus
WASHINGTON -- Sandy, themonster hurricane, continuedon a grim path toward the mid-Atlantic coastline Sunday, asmillions of anxious residentsbraced for high winds, torren-tial rains, heavy flooding, powerblackouts and a lot of misery.The hurricane, whichchurned off the North Carolinacoast Sunday morning, wasexpected to roar ashore, per-haps on the New Jersey coast-line, on Monday night or earlyTuesday. But winds of up to 60mph were expected to beginbattering a wide swath of theEastern Seaboard on Monday.Federal officials warned of predicted high storm surgesthat already have promptedevacuation orders in scores of coastal communities in NewJersey, New York, Delaware andother states.“We’ve been talking aboutSandy for a couple of days,but the time for preparing andtalking is about over,” FEMAAdministrator Craig Fugate saidin a conference call with report-ers Sunday, urging coastal resi-dents to heed evacuation orders.The storm, he said, is expectedto produce a “very high poten-tially life-threatening” surge.Tom Kines, a meteorologistwith Accu Weather, said hehasn’t seen anything like Sandyin his nearly 30 years on the job.“As far as the amount of dam-age that she will likely do, thisis a once in a lifetime storm,” hesaid.Strong winds will be felthundreds of miles away fromthe center of the hurricane, hesaid.The storm is expected todump 4 to 8 inches of rain,though 12 inches could fall insome communities. Storm surgeand high tides could reach 6 to11 feet in some areas. Also, twofeet or more of snow could fall inWest Virginia.In Virginia, Jeff Caldwell,a spokesman for Gov. BobMcDonnell, said officials arebracing for strong winds andheavy rain in the eastern half of the state and possibly snowalong the western border.“With the potential for highwinds and flooding, we areprepared to close the HamptonRoads tunnels, which will shutdown the interstates in thatregion,’’ he told the Los AngelesTimes. “All in all, Virginiaremains under a state of emer-gency and is preparing for a dif-ficult couple of days, and we areadvising citizens to be vigilantin their own preparations.’With millions of residentsexpected to lose power in themid-Atlantic, and possibly far-ther north, utility companiesrushed in reinforcement crewsfrom as far away as New Mexico.Officials predicted that powercould be out for a week or morein communities.The White House announcedthat President Obama would flyback to Washington on Mondayafter a campaign event in Ohioin order to monitor preparationsfor and response to the storm.While the annual MarineCorps Marathon got underwayunder windy, cloudy skies inWashington, D.C., the stormalready was affecting travelacross the country. Thousandsof flights have been cancelled.“The weather is already goingdownhill in the mid-Atlanticstates,” National HurricaneCenter Director Rick Knabbsaid in the conference call withreporters.“We have tropical storm con-ditions through Cape Hatterasand now into southern Virginia,”said Todd Kimberlain, a fore-caster at the National HurricaneCenter. “Those are going tostart spreading up the coast intothe remainder of the coastalVirginia, the Chesapeake Bayand then into the mid-Atlanticregion,” probably by Sundayafternoon.“The winds are spread outover a huge area,” Kimberlainsaid. “Even though the centermay come ashore in New Jersey,the strong winds are goingto extend all the way up intoBoston.’’In Reheboth Beach, Del., peo-ple who live within a quarter-mile of the shore were orderedto evacuate by 8 p.m. Sunday.Officials warned that Sandycould bring a foot of more of rainand a storm surge that could“approach the storm surge cre-ated by the great nor’easterof 1962, the storm of modernrecord.”
HalloweenAccessories!
 
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Monday, October 29, 2012
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Page 3
Blood drive to benefit UA employee
By Mary Kathryn Patterson
Contributing Writer
University of Alabama employ-ees will host a bone marrow reg-istry drive on campus to supporta co-worker recently diagnosedwith a rare blood cancer. Thedrive will take place Oct. 31 out-side of Reese Phifer Hall and theFerguson Plaza from 10 a.m. to 3p.m.Gray Lloyd, a graduate of theUniversity and producer at theCenter for Public Televisionand Radio in Reese Phifer, wasdiagnosed with blastic plasma-cytoid dendritic cell neoplasmin August. Doctors told Lloydin addition to chemotherapy,he would need a bone marrowtransplant to keep his cancerfrom coming back.“Due to the severity of my cancer, a bone marrowtransplant must be done duringthe first remission,” Lloyd said.“Otherwise, the cancer will comeback, and it usually kills you.”Lloyd was matched withhis donor through the Be TheMatch registry, which is oper-ated by the National MarrowDonor Program. Be The Matchis the world’s largest registry of potential bone marrow donors,with 9.5 million people on thelist to donate.Rachel Harris, account execu-tive for Be The Match, said col-lege students were often primecandidates to join a donor list.“Transplant doctors choosedonors between the ages of 18and 44 the majority of the time,”Harris said. “We need young,diverse members on the registryto give patients a better chanceto find a match and a hope fora cure.”A cheek swab is taken to jointhe registry, and that determinesif the donor could be a match foranyone, Harris said.“The [bone marrow] donationprocess is easier than most peo-ple think,” Harris said. “Over 80percent of the time, it’s a bloodprocess similar to donating plate-lets. The other 20 percent, it’s anoutpatient procedure where aneedle is used to take marrowfrom your hip, and you are asleepfor the entire process.”Lloyd was first told by hisdoctor that it would likely beone to three months before hewas matched with a non-relat-ed donor, but his match wasfound faster than the doctorsanticipated.“When I went in for my secondchemo treatment in October, wemet with the bone marrow teambeforehand, who informed methat they had found a match,”Lloyd said. “We didn’t believewhat we were hearing at first.In the back of my mind, Ithought it would be much lon-ger before they would find amatch for me.”Lloyd said he was thankfulthere were people who havealready signed up to register forbone marrow donation, and hehopes to see students respondto the drive.“The process is not as com-plicated or as painful as it usedto be, and by doing this, you aresaving someone’s life,” Lloydsaid. “I can’t thank my donorenough because who knowswhere I would be in a couplemonths without him.”For more informationabout the Be The Match reg-istry, contact Rachel Harris atrharris@nmdp.org.
Programs offer adults degree opportunities
By Mark Hammontree
Contributing Writer
There is an increasing num-ber of undergraduates at TheUniversity of Alabama who areolder than the typical collegestudent.The number of students age25 or older who are enrolled atthe University as either full-time or part-time students hassteadily risen every year sincefall 2008. In that year, there were1,753 students who fell into thatage bracket, and, in fall 2012,2,323 enrolled students are 25 orolder including 11 students 65 orolder. The increase in the num-ber of these students follows thegeneral enrollment increase theUniversity has experienced as awhole in the past several years.“Distance learning degreesare on the increase, both in sup-ply and demand,” Rebecca Pow,associate dean of the College of Continuing Studies, said. “TheUniversity of Alabama has pro-vided opportunities for adultand non-traditional studentsfor nearly a century. Today, stu-dents from all over the worldare able to pursue their educa-tional dreams through our tech-nology-based learning formatsrepresenting over 70 degreeprograms.”The College of ContinuingStudies has several programsthat provide opportunities foradults from various circum-stances to take classes and earna degree from the University.BamaByDistance offers flex-ible programs for earning abachelor’s, master’s, and even adoctoral degree through onlinecourses in addition to weekendor evening classes. The pro-grams offer students an oppor-tunity to attain a college degreeat a pace and convenience tai-lored to each individual.“Our most popular degreeprogram is the online Bachelorof Science in Commerce andBusiness Administration(General Business) degree,”Pow said. “We also offer dis-tance degree programs inengineering, education, humanenvironmental sciences, socialwork, arts and sciences, libraryand information studies andlaw.”BackToBama is a programdesigned to give former UA stu-dents the ability to come backand finish where they had leftoff. To be eligible, a studentmust have attempted at least15 credit hours of class. Also, atleast two semesters must haveelapsed since they were stu-dents.New College LifeTrack – for-merly External Degree Program– is a program that allows adultsto study their interests in anindividualized manner thatresults in an interdisciplinaryeducation and a degree. Theprogram offers distance cours-es, self-study, and also the optionof taking on-campus courses atthe University. According to theLifeTrack website, the programhas graduated more than 1,800students with degrees.Many opportunities existfor adults to attain a collegedegree from the University of Alabama. In today’s world, it isincreasingly important to havea college degree, and not just forprofessional success.“For most people in thiscategory, obtaining a degreeis a very personal goal,” NinaSmith, Program Manager forStudent Services, said. “Wehave several students who haveachieved a very high level of suc-cess without their degree, fromcorporate executives to profes-sional athletes. But, on a verypersonal level, they feel there issomething missing. So, return-ing to school or starting for thefirst time for an adult student itis not necessarily for monetarygain or career advancement, butfor the pride and the sense of self-achievement.”The flexibility and variety of the programs offered meansthat adults can take coursesfrom their own bedrooms orright here on campus in a classfull of 19 and 20-year-olds. Moreinformation on these programscan be found on the College of Continuing Studies website.
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