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Barrow Clump - Display

Barrow Clump - Display

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Published by Wessex Archaeology
This is a set of two (2m heigh) banners and 3 (A1) panels. These were produced to exhibit the work Wessex Archaeology has been doing alongside the military 'Operation Nightingale' with it's sister initiative 'Project Florence', recording on video the excavation of a Bronze Age Barrow site and a set of Saxon graves.
This is a set of two (2m heigh) banners and 3 (A1) panels. These were produced to exhibit the work Wessex Archaeology has been doing alongside the military 'Operation Nightingale' with it's sister initiative 'Project Florence', recording on video the excavation of a Bronze Age Barrow site and a set of Saxon graves.

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Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Wessex Archaeology on Apr 16, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/14/2014

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Operation Nightingale
is a ground-breakingmilitary initiative. It utilises archaeology to aid the recoveryand skill development of soldiers injured in conflict.Soldiers are developing new skills and confidence whileexcavating sites all over the country. Several of these sitesare considered to be at risk.Operation Nightingale teamed up with Wessex Archaeologyin 2012 to excavate a Bronze Age burial mound and Saxoncemetery at Barrow Clump, in the Salisbury Plain Training Area.
making sense of heritage
Visitthewebsitehere
 
Barrow Clump, on Salisbury Plain, has been asite of human activity for over five thousandyears. Originally a Neolithic settlement site,the area has produced flintwork and potterydating to at least 3500 BC. In the Early BronzeAge (around 2000 BC) this edge of the AvonValley was chosen as the location for overtwenty burial mounds, or barrows. Thesemonuments marked the landscape inremembrance of the dead who were buriedthere. One of the largest of the barrows wasre-used as a cemetery in the Saxon period,between 500 and 600 AD. This barrow is theonly mound still visible today, having beenprotected from ploughing by a clump of trees.The core of the surviving barrow was originallyconstructed in the 'Beaker' period (around2200 BC) and comprised a small mound andring-ditch. It was later enlarged, creating thedistinctive form of a bell barrow. The largecentral mound was surrounded by a ring-ditchof 45 metres in diameter. The chalk dug byhand from this ditch was used to cap themound which would have been visible inthe landscape from a distance.Operation Nightingale soldiers excavateda cremation burial that has been datedto the Early Bronze Age by part of anarcher's wristguard that was found withthe cremated bone.Although Barrow Clump is protected byits designation as a Scheduled AncientMonument, Operation Nightingale was givenspecial permission to excavate and record thesurviving barrow due to the extensive damagebeing caused by badgers.
wessexarchaeology
Bronze Age Barrow
Archaeology in Action
Barrow Clump
1 CM
WristguardBell BarrowBarrow Ditch
making sense of heritage
 
Saxon Cemetery
Archaeology in Action
Barrow Clump
Men and women in the Saxon period wereburied in their clothes and often with prizedpossessions. At Barrow Clump, several of themale burials were accompanied by itemsassociated with warfare. These includedspearheads, shield bosses (the metal centresof wooden shields) and knives. Female burials,on the other hand, contained items of  jewellery such as brooches, rings and beads.The star find of the dig was a rare Saxon bucket – a manly drinking vessel. This bronze-boundtankard has been so wellpreserved that even thewood has survived.The surviving burial mound at Barrow Clumpwas re-used as a cemetery in the 6th centuryAD by Saxons from a local settlement. It ispossible that the Saxons recognised the originalpurpose of the monument as a burial mound,although they may simply have selected the sitedue to its prominent position in the landscape.So far, 36 Saxon burials have been excavated.The cemetery contained graves of both menand women, children and adults, with noobvious patterns or divisions between age,sex or social class. Interestingly none of thegraves appeared to overlap each othersuggesting that they were marked on thesurface in some way, perhaps by woodenmarkers or small mounds of earth.
S
hield BossSaxonBucketSpearhead
SaxonBucketSpearheads
1 CM1 CM
making sense of heritage
wessexarchaeology

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