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Peru

Peru

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Dolar Vasani interviewed open government reformers in 15 different countries
about their OGP experiences so far. She interviewed about 40 of them, both in civil society and government and involved in OGP. How did the consultation go? Is there an ongoing dialogue with the government in place? What can we learn and what can we improve? Has OGP already been useful in pushing for change?

The countries we focused on are Brazil, Costa Rica, Croatia, Ghana, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, The Netherlands, Peru, the Philippines, the UK, Ukraine and the USA

Dolar Vasani interviewed open government reformers in 15 different countries
about their OGP experiences so far. She interviewed about 40 of them, both in civil society and government and involved in OGP. How did the consultation go? Is there an ongoing dialogue with the government in place? What can we learn and what can we improve? Has OGP already been useful in pushing for change?

The countries we focused on are Brazil, Costa Rica, Croatia, Ghana, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, The Netherlands, Peru, the Philippines, the UK, Ukraine and the USA

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Published by: Open Government Partnership on Jul 08, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/08/2013

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says Samuel. Proética also organisedtwo informational workshopsWe made intensive use of our socialmedia accounts to disseminate theAction Plan and to invite commentsduring the consultation period. Inthe end, we didn’t get a massiveresponse,’consultations were divided betweenthe Secretariat – responsible for thestate agencies, and Proética andothers who shared the plan withother broader civil society. The draftAction Plan was also posted on thewebsite of the Presidency of theCouncil of Ministers athttp://www.pcm.gob.pe/InformacionGral/sgp/plan_accion.htmland on other government websites.Comments and suggestions wereinvited. The use of social media(Twitter and Facebook) wasrestricted largely to techies andactivists, with mixed results.NGOs and business associations.An eight-member public–privateworking group was establishedwith equal representation fromcivil society and government.The four NGOs nominated bya broader group were specialistorganisations involved in issues ofgovernance, transparency, freedomof information, anti-corruption,development and povertyalleviation. Under the principle ofequal participation, ‘we shared therole of rapporteur between theSecretary of Public Managementand Proética, the Peruvian chapterof Transparency International,thereby dividing the work ofdisseminating information andgathering inputs for the action plan,’says Samuel Rotta of Proética.
FROM DRAFTING ANDCONSULTING TO FINALISING
The initial Action Plan drafted bythe working group formed thebasis of wider consultations, whichwere held during March 2012. TheThe Peruvian state and theadministration of President OllantaHumala decided to join theOGP in September 2011, therebyrearming the President’s prioritiesof enhancing transparency,ghting corruption, improvingaccountability and increasing civicengagement. In November 2011,the rst meeting was convenedby the Department of ForeignAairs with NGOs and variousgovernment agencies, whereuponthe Secretary of Public Managementof the Presidency of the Councilof Ministers was assigned theresponsibility of setting up amultisectoral working group todevelop the Peruvian Action Plan.The OGP principle of engagingcivil society in the Action Planprocess was understood at theoutset. According to Mariana Llona,Head of the Secretariat, ‘there wasnever a dierentiated space wheregovernment gathered separatelyfrom civil society.’ Invitations wentout to a range of civil societyorganisations – labour unions,
ASPIRING TO A MORE INCLUSIVEPROCESS
PERÚ
 
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- Ana María Tamayo, Advisor to the Secretariatin the capital, Lima, which wereattended by 20–30 dierent CSOs,including environmentalists andthose working in education, healthand women’s rights. Meanwhile,the Secretariat organised variousforums such as round tablemeetings with public agenciesand workshops, including onespecically for techies. During thisperiod the media was mobilisedto raise public awareness andenhance citizen participation.‘At the end of the process, wereceived 36 contributions from 33contributors, nine of whom werecitizens, nine were civil societyorganisations and 15 were publicbodies,’ Ana María Tamayo, anAdvisor to the Secretariat explains.The international developmentpartner, GIZ, supported the workinggroup with funding for consultants,and helped with the developmentof indicators and other activitiesfollowing the release of the ActionPlan. Once all inputs had beensystemised and discussed by theworking group, the nal Action Plan
ASPIRING TO A MORE INCLUSIVE PROCESS
PERÚ:
‘There was signicant synergy between the state andcivil society, which gave impetus to the design processof the action plan and the subsequent development of indicators.’ 
These key constraints limited civilsociety and government inputs andrestricted the meetings to Lima.was prepared, adopted and nallyapproved by a ministerial resolutionin early April 2012, in readinessfor formal submission to the OGPSteering Committee.
SOME REFLECTIONS
According to Samuel, a keysuccess of the process from civilsociety’s perspective has been itsparticipation in the working groupand the chance to be involved fromthe very beginning in setting publicpolicy. And while the number oforganisations may have been small,their representation has been broad.For government, since its inceptionthe initiative has remained true tothe spirit of civil society inclusion.‘There was signicant synergybetween the state and civil society,which gave impetus to the designprocess of the Action Plan andthe subsequent development ofindicators,’ says Ana. Both partiesalso agree on the shortcomingsof the consultation process: time,nances and human resources.
LOOKING AHEAD
In January 2013, a permanentMultisectoral Commission – madeup of government agencies, civilsociety and the private sectorwas created by a Supreme Decreesigned by the President, PrimeMinister and Chancellor. This‘The tight timelines also servedas a positive incentive to getthings moving fast. However, ourcommunication strategy to spreadthe word was far from ideal. Peru isa multicultural, multi-ethnic countryand we need to develop a friendlierlanguage with which to approachthe people – youth organisationsand women’s groups, as well as thelocal municipalities.’
 
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- Samuel Rotta of Proéticanew legal entity is responsiblefor monitoring, evaluating anddisseminating the Action Plan.
‘We need to nd ways of making the OGP moreappealing by persuading the media to tell real stories, for example of how a person in the Andes is making use of the Access to Information Law.’ 
‘It is important that theOGP Working Group is nowinstitutionalised, and with thiscomes validation and security,’says Samuel. The representationof the private sector is consideredimportant – in the form of socialentrepreneurs who foster socialinnovation and attract investmentin strategic areas such as educationand technology. The media ispresent among the Commission’sother members, including amuch-valued representative of theCouncil of Peruvian Journalism, anNGO working on issues of pressfreedom. ‘We need to nd ways ofmaking the OGP more appealingby persuading the media to tellreal stories, for example of how aperson in the Andes is making useof the Access to Information Law,’suggests Samuel. Demonstratinghow policies change the lives ofordinary people remains an on-going challenge.Open government principles are notnew to Peru or Latin America. Afteryears of political and economiccrisis, both government and civilsociety believe the OGP capturesthe rethinking of transparency andaccess to information issues thathas taken place. The involvementof all organs of civil society remainsvital to legitimising the Action Plan.‘The administration is condentthat this initiative could enhancethe trust between the state and itscitizens,’ says Ana.
For more information or to get in touchwith one of the people interviewed, pleasee-mail nvaart@hivos.nl.

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