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The Link, issue 13

The Link, issue 13

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Published by cabralyc
The Link is produced by Krishnamurti Link International (KLI). Photographs in The Link were taken by Friedrich Grohe unless stated otherwise. Contributions, whether anonymous or not, do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or publisher. Anyone wishing to reproduce extracts from The Link is welcome to do so, with the exception of reprinted letters and copyrighted articles.

The Link is free of charge. Additional copies of this or previous issues may be obtained by contacting The Link staff at:

Chalet Solitude
1659 - Rougemont
Switzerland

email: kli@kmail.ch
The Link is produced by Krishnamurti Link International (KLI). Photographs in The Link were taken by Friedrich Grohe unless stated otherwise. Contributions, whether anonymous or not, do not necessarily represent the views of the editors or publisher. Anyone wishing to reproduce extracts from The Link is welcome to do so, with the exception of reprinted letters and copyrighted articles.

The Link is free of charge. Additional copies of this or previous issues may be obtained by contacting The Link staff at:

Chalet Solitude
1659 - Rougemont
Switzerland

email: kli@kmail.ch

More info:

Published by: cabralyc on May 17, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/12/2012

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THE LINK
No. 13 · Winter 1997/98
 
2
Cover Picture: Palm tree against sunset, spring, eastern end of Ojai Valley, California 
The Newsletter
Dear Friends 3Krishnamurti: A Dialogue on Death4A Tribute to Pupul Jayakar5The Right Place of Thought8A Reply to David Peat14
Meeting K
Krishnamurti as I Knew Him15Meeting K in Saanen21
The First Step
Editors Note25The Holistic Approach of Krishnamurti26Living with the Teachings28Responses to Password to the K World32
On Education
Introduction35Dumbing Us Down A Book Review 35The 2nd Summer Conference at Brockwood 38The Students Perspective41Journal of the Krishnamurti Schools42Learning through Direct Observation 44
International Network
A Visit to K-Inspired Projects48The Saanen Gathering 1997 53Can Work Go Together with Inward Flowering? 55Krishnamurti on Identification59Addresses and Announcements60Epilogue 63
Intention of The Link
We sense sometimes a little confusion about the intention of The Link. It is not its function to spread the teachings.Krishnamurti said, “You cannot spread the teachings. You must live it, then it will spread.” The function of The Link isto keep people informed of what is going on in the Krishnamurti information centres, schools, foundations and relatedprojects; to give individuals the opportunity to report about their investigations, their activities, their relationship to theworld and to the teachings. Its main function is to be THE LINK.
 
Dear Friends,
I
N
1997 I
LOSTMYOLDESTAND DEARESTFRIEND
,whom I had known since childhood, and two oldfamily friends. We also lost three friends fromthe Krishnamurti Foundations – Pupul Jayakar,G.Narayan and Mahesh Saxena – each of whomhad long years of contact with K; and otherfriends of many yearsassociation,includingElena Greene, Basil Gossage, Lena Frederick andJoe Links, beloved husband of Mary Lutyens,Krishnamurti’s biographer. All of them were goodpeople: I wonder if it is goodness which remainsafter life.I remember walking in Nepal, alone on apath, when three men came around a cornercarrying a dead body. They were carrying it to beburnt at a nearby river. At one point, the man infront couldn’t contain his sorrow. He leanedagainst the earthen bank beside the path, coveredhis face with his hands and cried bitterly. It wassimple and touching. (K also described similarscenes in India.)Being so concerned with death at this time,I am dedicating the space of this letter to severalrelevant quotations from K. I know that no setof extracts can give a complete picture of whatK said about a subject, but perhaps they will in-spire someone to read further.Tomorrow we ought to talk about death. Itis not a morbid subject. It is not somethingto be avoided. If you have lived the thing thatwe have been talking about, you will come toall this delicately, gently, quietly, not out ofcuriosity. You will come to it hesitantly, withgreat dignity, with inward respect. Like birth,it is a tremendous thing. Death also impliescreation – not invention. Scientists are in-venting; their invention is born from know-ledge. Creation is continuous. It has nobeginning and no end. It is not born out ofknowledge. And death may be the meaningof creation – not a matter of having a nextlife with better opportunities, a better house,better refrigerator. It may be a sense oftremendous creation, endlessly, withoutbeginning and end.”Meeting Life,
p. 228, Copyright KFT 
K often used to say that to live one must dieto oneself.To die is to love. The beauty of love is notin past remembrances or in the images oftomorrow. Love has no past and no future;what has, is memory, which is not love.Love with its passion is just beyond therange of society, which is you. Die, and it isthere.Meditation is a movement in and of the un-known. You are not there, only the move-ment. You are too petty or too great for thismovement. It has nothing behind it or infront of it. It is that energy which thought-matter cannot touch. Thought is perversionfor it is the product of yesterday; it iscaught in the toils of centuries and so it isconfused, unclear. Do what you will, theknown cannot reach out for the unknown.Meditation is the dying to the known.”Meeting Life,
pp. 5-6, Copyright KFT 
K also used to speak about our life as thestream of selfishness. In Sidney Field’s book
The Reluctant Messiah 
, the Appendix records adiscussion which K had with his old friendSidney and others about Sidney’s brother John,
3
The Newsletter
The Newsletter

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